Luis Hernandez

Host, Sundial/ Afternoon Anchor

Luis Hernandez is an award-winning journalist and host whose career spans three decades in cities across the U.S. He’s the host of WLRN’s newest daily talk show, Sundial (Mon-Thu), and the news anchor every afternoon during All Things Considered.

Luis joined the WLRN newsroom in 2014, and he’s no stranger to life in South Florida. He is a true Florida kid. He grew up in Palm Beach County, spent Hurricane Andrew in a closet in Doral, and has spent almost 40 years as a resident of the Sunshine State.

Before arriving at WLRN, Luis spent four years at KNPR in Las Vegas, as the host of the daily talk program, State of Nevada. While there, he worked to increase the station’s reach within the Hispanic community. He covered the 2012 presidential election from “Sin City,” as well as environmental issues, immigration policy, and the recovery from the 2008 housing disaster.

While working at WUFT, he mentored students from the University of Florida’s celebrated journalism program. He has spent roughly 14 years now in public broadcasting.

Before entering the realm of public radio, Luis worked in news and sports for Clear Channel Communications in Miami, West Palm Beach, and Jacksonville. He also spent two years in television at LeSea Broadcasting in Denver, Colorado.  

When he’s not behind the mic or on the phone with sources, he spends his free time trying to finish his “great American novel.”

Hector Gabino / El Nuevo Herald Staff

It was almost a year ago when international soccer star David Beckham stood before a crowd of Miami leaders and fans to announce he chose Miami as the home to his new expansion franchise for Major League Soccer.

Beckham retired in 2013, but part of his contract with the MLS was a $25 million option to start a franchise. On the day of the announcement there was a lot of excitement. A year later, that excitement has become somewhat deflated. (Super Bowl pun intended.)

Jae C. Hong / AP Photo

Cuban baseball players live a great life compared to other Cuban residents. They make approximately $40 to $200 a month with a few extra bonus incentives, a much better salary than the average Cuban's. They also get better housing, an annual bonus and the coveted privilege of traveling.

An hour before the opening of the inaugural Magic City Comic Con, hundreds of comic fans and cosplay enthusiasts were lined up around the Miami Airport Convention Center to find the latest deals on comic books, show off their costumes and meet their favorite artists.

Dolphins fans will notice changes to the stadium next season. Construction crews have begun renovations by removing hundreds of seats. It's part of a $350 million facelift to the 27-year-old stadium. 

Last week the team opened up the stadium for a group of county officials and the media. Owner Stephen Ross announced his commitment to give the stadium a reset. The changes would improve the experience for fans. But the biggest reason for the facelift is about getting back on the list of sites to host the Super Bowl. 

    

There are more than 60 different conventions for comic book collectors, anime and Cosplay enthusiasts, toy collectors and science fiction fans in the state of Florida every year. They are relatively small affairs, nothing close to the mega-events such as Comic-Con International in San Diego, which attracts more than 100,000 fans annually.

University of Miami Miller School of Medicine med.miami.edu

According to a report from the NCAA, a little more than seven percent of injuries in college football are concussions. 

Julio Cortez / AP

Earlier today, President Barack Obama proclaimed that the policies toward Cuba over the past 50 years have not worked and announced major changes in U.S.-Cuba relations.

Obama reiterated that opening travel, financial exchanges, and telecommunications between the two nations will allow American values to be more easily shared with the Cuban people.

Lynne Sladky / El Nuevo Herald

Fort Lauderdale Mayor Jack Seiler is adamant about the city's ordinances relating to homeless issues. He has said, as have other city commissioners, that the laws are for public safety.

That hasn't softened the blow of the international scrutiny from social media as well as the late night shows, including The Colbert Report.

International Space Station (via Instagram at http://instagram.com/iss)

At some point during his studies at Florida Atlantic University, astronaut Steve Swanson started thinking about his future. Perhaps it could involve space travel.

Eventually, Swanson did become an engineer for NASA. He took two shuttle missions to the International Space Station between 2007 and 2009. His last trip began in March of this year, when he took a Russian rocket back to the ISS for a six-month tour.

Newslink

Nov 28, 2014

Johns Hopkins Krieger School of Arts and Sciences / http://history.jhu.edu/directory/nathan-connolly/

N.D.B. Connolly grew up in South Florida and couldn't wait to leave. That's when he realized just how attached he was to the region. That's also when he started to look at the history of Miami and how for more than a century Jim Crow laws made life in the Magic City painful and difficult for African-Americans.

Newslink

Nov 11, 2014

November 5, 2014: Post-Election Recaps

Nov 5, 2014

Today on WLRN-Miami Herald News:

  

Wikimedia

This year Fort Lauderdale commissioners passed a series of laws that have homeless advocates livid.

For example, it's now illegal to sleep in public places in the city's downtown. It's also illegal to beg for money at major intersections within the city. Most recently, a new set of rules were approved that make it harder for non-profits and churches to feed the homeless.

MARC CAPUTO MCAPUTO@MIAMIHERALD.COM

Governor Rick Scott and opponent Charlie Crist will debate Tuesday for the final time before the Nov. 4 election.

CNN will host both candidates at the WJXT-TV studios in Jacksonville.

Co-moderator Jake Tapper, from CNN's "The Lead," says unlike the debate last week at Broward College in Davie, this debate will take place in a space with no audience and few reporters.

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