Luis Hernandez

Host, Sundial/ Afternoon Anchor

Luis Hernandez is an award-winning journalist and host whose career spans three decades in cities across the U.S. He’s the host of WLRN’s newest daily talk show, Sundial (Mon-Thu), and the news anchor every afternoon during All Things Considered.

Luis joined the WLRN newsroom in 2014, and he’s no stranger to life in South Florida. He is a true Florida kid. He grew up in Palm Beach County, spent Hurricane Andrew in a closet in Doral, and has spent almost 40 years as a resident of the Sunshine State.

Before arriving at WLRN, Luis spent four years at KNPR in Las Vegas, as the host of the daily talk program, State of Nevada. While there, he worked to increase the station’s reach within the Hispanic community. He covered the 2012 presidential election from “Sin City,” as well as environmental issues, immigration policy, and the recovery from the 2008 housing disaster.

While working at WUFT, he mentored students from the University of Florida’s celebrated journalism program. He has spent roughly 14 years now in public broadcasting.

Before entering the realm of public radio, Luis worked in news and sports for Clear Channel Communications in Miami, West Palm Beach, and Jacksonville. He also spent two years in television at LeSea Broadcasting in Denver, Colorado.  

When he’s not behind the mic or on the phone with sources, he spends his free time trying to finish his “great American novel.”

DANIEL BOCK / FOR THE MIAMI HERALD

Florida wildlife officials are hosting another snake hunt, but they don't want to call it a hunt. It's the Python Challenge. It's not likely to put much of a dent on the growing population of the invasive species, but that doesn't mean the event will be a failure.

Luis Hernandez / WLRN

Ever wonder what Beethoven or Mozart might think if they were asked to assemble a score for the newest edition of a Playstation video game?

Scott Flaven, the visiting conductor at the Frost School of Music at the University of Miami, says video game music is rapidly becoming the forefront of music composing.

So students got together and decided to create an ensemble of music from their favorite video games. Some of the games that inspired them include Portal, Bioshock, Super Mario Bros. and Pong.

Southern Poverty Law Center / http://www.splcenter.org/Year-in-Hate-and-Extremism

The Southern Poverty Law Center reports there are currently 784 hate groups nationwide. Those groups can be anything from Ku Klux Klan to neo-Nazis to black separatists and anti-LGBT groups. All of them are listed in the SPLC's The Year In Hate and Extremism report.

Luis Hernandez / WLRN

There's always something that can take us back to our childhood in an instant. It could be a toy, a song or maybe a game.

For many kids growing up in the early and mid-20th century on the streets of New York, or Boston or Philadelphia, that game was stickball. The streets, the parks and the alleyways became Yankee Stadium, or Fenway Park or Connie Mack Stadium. Stickball was as big as most major sports for kids in their early teens.

Millions of runners are searching for a new challenge. They want something with more danger and fun than a traditional marathon event.

FL Center for Environmental Studies

A leader must possess imagination. -- Omar Nelson Bradley, Army General, World War II, Korean War

Military leaders depend on imagination. Conflict can spring up anywhere in the world, so leaders must be thinking about every possible scenario, every consequence on action taken or not taken. And that's what a group of retired admirals and generals are asking of political leaders: Have imagination. Consider all the possible consequences of climate change and its impact on the national security of the United States.

Conan Goes to Cuba

Mar 5, 2015
Conan O'Brien Show / teamcoco.com

In his white suit and hat, the six-foot-four red-headed television host Conan O'Brien was anything but inconspicuous as he walked the streets of Havana. 

The trip took place in mid-February but aired last night. 

Conan's clips include: a visit to a rum museum, rumba dance lessons and a jam session with a salsa band. It was all in the goofy, awkward and self-deprecating humor that Conan O'Brien fans expect.

Joe Burbank / Orlando Sentinel

On the brink of this year's legislative session, Governor Rick Scott is dealing with a big thorn. Scott replaced former head of the Florida Department of Law Enforcement Gerald Bailey, saying Bailey left voluntarily.

Bailey says that's a lie. 

When Governor Scott's lawyer told Bailey to retire, Bailey did pack up his stuff and leave. A few days later, Scott said Bailey resigned. Bailey said that wasn't true and called the governor a liar in the public square. Things rapidly went down from there.

What you heard today on WLRN:

What you heard today on WLRN News:

Today on WLRN-Miami Herald News, you heard:

Today on WLRN-Miami Herald News, you heard:

Luis Hernandez / WLRN

It may be fair to say many of us today will take out our phones or simply log into our GPS units in our cars and allow a soothing, distant voice to guide us to our destination. 

There was a time though when finding our way meant pulling over and unfolding a 4-by-5-foot map littered with white lines for roadways. Highways and freeways were either red or blue, and small drawings marked different points of interest. 

Luis Hernandez / WLRN

There used to be a time when athletes would get knocked in the head, fall to the ground, struggle to get back on their feet and wobble around before regaining their bearings.

It used to be called "getting a ding." Athletes were encouraged to just "walk it off."

That still happens in many sports, from the youth levels all the way to the pros. But over the past few years, recreational leagues, schools and athletic associations have gotten more serious about these head injuries.

Joe Rimkus Jr. / Miami Herald Staff

It's not a canary or a coal mine in Florida, but the idea from Audubon of Florida is the same. Wading birds hold the same function as the canary, and in this case the coal mine is the Everglades. Tabitha Cale with the society says things are dire.

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