Luis Hernandez

Host, Sundial/ Afternoon Anchor

Luis Hernandez is an award-winning journalist and host whose career spans three decades in cities across the U.S. He’s the host of WLRN’s newest daily talk show, Sundial (Mon-Thu), and the news anchor every afternoon during All Things Considered.

Luis joined the WLRN newsroom in 2014, and he’s no stranger to life in South Florida. He is a true Florida kid. He grew up in Palm Beach County, spent Hurricane Andrew in a closet in Doral, and has spent almost 40 years as a resident of the Sunshine State.

Before arriving at WLRN, Luis spent four years at KNPR in Las Vegas, as the host of the daily talk program, State of Nevada. While there, he worked to increase the station’s reach within the Hispanic community. He covered the 2012 presidential election from “Sin City,” as well as environmental issues, immigration policy, and the recovery from the 2008 housing disaster.

While working at WUFT, he mentored students from the University of Florida’s celebrated journalism program. He has spent roughly 14 years now in public broadcasting.

Before entering the realm of public radio, Luis worked in news and sports for Clear Channel Communications in Miami, West Palm Beach, and Jacksonville. He also spent two years in television at LeSea Broadcasting in Denver, Colorado.  

When he’s not behind the mic or on the phone with sources, he spends his free time trying to finish his “great American novel.”

Luis Hernandez / WLRN

Author Edwidge Danticat tackles one of the heaviest topics that underlies so many of her stories, death. We talk to her about her relationship with her mother before her passing, and how that loss impacted her latest book 'The Art of Death.' 

We sit down with ten-year-old Catalina Frias. She was the winner of this year's Chopped Junior on the Food Network. What was it like competing with her sister, handling the pressure of being on television, and her blog 'The Three Forks.'

WALTER MICHOT / Miami Herald

Florida Power & Light spent $3 billion over the past decade to strengthen its lines and power grid. But after Hurricane Irma left millions of FPL customers without power for a week or more, critics are asking what the money accomplished. 

The utility company says that the money was well spent and that the recovery after Irma went far better than the efforts after Hurricane Wilma. We'll hear from the utility on their performance, as well as the Florida Office of Public Counsel, the office created to represent utility consumers.

CARL JUSTE / Miami Herald

Holly Neher is (unofficially) the first female in Florida history to start at quarterback on a high school football team. It's only unofficial because the Florida High School Athletic Association has not been able to confirm it.

In her first game in August, Neher threw a 42-yard touchdown pass, again a first in Florida high school sports.

Miami Herald

Jim Morin started his art career drawing the cartoons that he enjoyed on Saturday mornings as a kid.

He studied art at Syracuse University and eventually found himself drawing caricatures of dignitaries and political leaders. All of that spun into a long and illustrious career as a political cartoonist with the Miami Herald. Two Pulitzer Prize awards later - the most recent one in 2017 - Morin is enjoying his retirement in Maine. 

Miami Herald

Puerto Ricans on the island are desperate for help following Hurricane Maria. As of this weekend, about 30 percent of the island has telecommunications capabilities; roughly half of supermarkets are open part of the time; and a little more than half of gas stations are pumping. But people need water. They need basic supplies. They need money. 

CNN reports that there are thousands of shipping containers stuck in San Juan's port. Barely 20 percent of truck drivers have returned to work. There's a fuel shortage. Add to that, many roads have not been cleared. 

Miami Herald

Rick Shaw was the voice for tens of thousands of South Florida teens back in the 1960s. For decades that followed, those same teens grew up still listening to Shaw spinning the songs they grew up with. Shaw, whose real name was James Hummell, passed away in mid-September at the age of 78.

WLRN's Joe Johnson had the opportunity to compete against Shaw for years. Johnson worked at Magic 102.7 FM while Shaw was at WAXY 106. Johnson said it was hard to compete against Shaw because of the way he treated people.

Kate Stein / WLRN News

"Where are the cots? Where are the blankets? Where's the back-up?" These were some of the questions evacuees at the Miami Edison Senior High School shelter were asking after waiting more than 36 hours for the arrival of Hurricane Irma. Food was running out. One person attempted suicide. And quite a few people left before the storm was over.

Miami Herald

Florida ranks No. 2  in the list of U.S. states with the most active hate groups. The most recent Hate Map, put out regularly by the Southern Poverty Law Center, shows 63 hate groups operating from Pensacola to Miami. 

C.M. GUERRERO / Miami Herald

Three South Florida high school students have come up with an invention that could protect people from becoming rape victims. What's that invention? They call it the Smart Straw.

CHARLES TRAINOR JR / Miami Herald

The Miami Dolphins are still waiting for Ryan Tannehill's MRI tests to come back. Things don't look good. According to Miami Herald's Armando Salguero, the Dolphin's quarterback has hyperextended his left knee, the same he injured last year.  

Salguero also says that there's the possibility that Tannehill may have suffered poster cruciate ligament damage. 

Ariana Cubillos / AP

A weekend vote in Venezuela to choose a "constituent assembly" that will rewrite the country's constitution - but which critics say will create a Cuba-style dictatorship - led to widespread violence and international rejection of the outcome.

On Monday, President Donald Trump imposed new sanctions on Venezuela's socialist president, Nicolás Maduro, branding him a "dictator." Nikki Haley, the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, called the so-called constituyente election "a sham."

Miami Herald

Earlier this month a swimmer was attacked by a shark at Haulover Beach in Miami-Dade County. That person suffered no life-threatening injuries, but the attack was shocking because it was so rare. In the last 135 years, there have only been 15 total attacks in Miami-Dade.

If you live in Miami and feel stressed because of the traffic and the high cost of living and your declining health, well take heart, this is a stressful place to live.

That's according to the personal finance website WalletHub.com. It just came out with its list of the 150 most and least stressful cities in the U.S. And the Magic City ain't so magic, at least when it comes to stress.

Miami Herald

This week the Miami Heat waived Chris Bosh due to medical reasons. It's likely that his playing days are over.

Luis Hernandez

Bad news for South Florida gamers: we are NOT No. 1.

The financial website  WalletHub has come out with its list of best cities in the U.S. for gamers and we barely made it to the middle of the pack. They look at a few factors, including access to WiFi, nearby arcades, video games stores and the number of eSports tournaments

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