Luis Hernandez

Morning anchor

I was introduced to radio my sophomore year of college, after a classmate invited me to audition for a DJ job at the campus' new radio station, WFCF. I showed up, read a couple of cue cards, and got the job. The following semester I changed his major and radio has been a part of my life ever since.

I moved back home to South Florida after graduation and worked as the sports director at WJNO in West Palm Beach living the tough life. You know, spending hours and hours going to sporting events and talking with some of the biggest names in sports in Miami.

I got the chance to head west for a few years, trading in the sunny beaches for life in the Mile-High City. There, I continued my radio career and dipped my toes into television life as a sports host for a local high school football show. But South Florida pulled me back and to the news desk at WIOD. It was an exhilarating and difficult experience during the 2004 hurricane season.

It was on my next adventure, a job at a newsroom in Gainesville, where I found public radio. (I like to brag about the fact that my time at the University of Florida came during the years the basketball team won back-to-back titles and Tim Tebow arrived.) From Gainesville I went to Fort Myers, then once again out west to public radio in Las Vegas.

While in Sin City (which by the way, people in Las Vegas hate when you call it that) I covered hard news, politics, environmental issues and had the chance to interview an interesting assortment of characters including Boyz II Men, Andre Agassi, and MikeTyson.

But Florida brought me back. And I'm grateful to be back in South Florida​​, for the third and final time.

Miami Herald

Late April is the only time football matters outside of the regular and post-seasons - It's the NFL draft, when teams try and make smart decisions, or try and look smart, and pick their future stars.

For the first time in its roughly two decades of existence, a South Florida LGBT film festival will not use the words gay or lesbian in the title of its event.

The former MiFo LGBT Film Festival starts Friday under a new name: OUTshine Film Festival, with 65  movies over 10 days.

Mark Gilbert, chairman of the festival, spoke recently with WLRN about the rebranding of the event. He started by taking us back a bit to understand how we got to this point.

WLRN

President Donald Trump arrives in Palm Beach Thursday afternoon for meetings at his Mar-a-Lago estate, dubbed the Winter White House, with Chinese President Xi Jingping.

Miami Herald

More than 50 people were recently arrested in a major international sting operation that led to the dismantling of an identity theft network centered in San Juan, Puerto Rico.

Two of the most recent defendants were Francisco Matos-Beltre and Isaias Beltre-Matos, both originating from the Dominican Republic. The network was selling Puerto Rican birth certificates in more than a dozen U.S. states. Alfonso Chardy of El Nuevo Herald tells how the network operated and whether Puerto Ricans should be concerned about their identity.

Miami Herald

NFL owners decided overwhelmingly to allow the Raiders to move from Oakland to Las Vegas. The Raiders started in Oakland, moved to Los Angeles, and then went back to Oakland. They're basically playing a very expensive version of 'musical chairs.'

I have to add a couple points here: As a former resident of Las Vegas the idea of a professional football team, especially the Raiders, in Sin City - well, it's a mixed bag for me.

Al Diaz / Miami Herald

Back in December Doral residents, by a vote of almost 2-1, put Juan Carlos Bermudez back in city hall as the city's mayor. This is not a new experience for Bermudez. He was Doral's founding mayor (2003-2012). We spoke with him about some of the challenges he faces this second time around. 

WLRN: Why did you want to come back to lead the city of Doral when you were already mayor?

http://florida.adl.org/

At least 86 Jewish organizations in the United States have received threats since Jan. 1, 2017, according to authorities. South Florida is no exception. Just this Monday, a bomb threat forced the evacuation of a Jewish Community Center in Davie. A synagogue in Miami Beach was desecrated  over the weekend and several cars in an Orthodox Jewish neighborhood were marked with swastikas. 

PATRICK FARRELL pfarrell@miamiherald.com / Miami Herald

Miami is one of the worst places for first-time home buyers according to the Demographia International Housing Affordability Survey. That will be obvious if you find yourself currently shopping for a nice and affordable home in the current market.

AL DIAZ / Miami Herald

The Miami Dolphins did not start the season with high expectations. There was a new coach. There were questions about quarterback Ryan Tannehill. It was believed that the team was, at best, a .500 team. Well, what a nice surprise.

Below, WLRN chats with Adam Beasley, who covers the Dolphins for the Miami Herald.

I want to know what did you really expect from this team and how would you rate the season as a whole?

Andrew Kaufman

When the Panama Canal expansion was completed over the summer, tens of thousands of Panamanians celebrated the accomplishment at a ceremony.

The expansion represented economic opportunities for Panama -- in the form of tolls collected from increased shipping. It also created an opportunity for national pride. It’s also the reason that Port Miami has been expanded, in order for the post-Panamax ships to be able to dock here.

Photographer Andrew Kaufman has been documenting the entire process.

Carrie Fisher passed away this week and she's obviously going to be remembered for her role as Princess Leia. But she has been in a lot of movies. 

White House

Eduardo Padrón has been the president of Miami-Dade College for more than 21 years. In that time, he expanded the college to offer hundreds of degrees to tens of thousands of students, especially for immigrant students, all while keeping education affordable. 

In Miami-Dade County, there are more than two million registered vehicles. Motorists will cover roughly 30,000 miles in a day countywide. But those numbers are meaningless if you're stuck on I-95 or any of the connected thoroughfares throughout South Florida. Basically, there just seems to be more and more cars on the road every year.

Katie Lepri / WLRN

Do you take public transportation regularly? If not, what would make you want to use it? 

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