Kenny Malone

Reporter

Kenny Malone hails from Meadville, PA where the zipper was invented, where Clark Gable’s mother is buried and where, in 2007, a wrecking ball broke free from a construction site, rolled down North Main Street and somehow wound up inside the trunk of a Ford Taurus sitting at a red light.

Malone graduated from Xavier University in Cincinnati, OH as a mathematics major and economics minor. He took an un-ironic oath to use mathematics for good not evil. Per that oath, Malone has taken on a wide array of non-evil numbers-based reporting endeavors -- everything from proving the existence of a home-field heat advantage for the Miami Dolphins to explaining South Florida’s economy in terms of automobiles on I-95 to exposing the extraordinary toll the densest cluster of assisted living facilities in the state had on both local authorities and the residents of those facilities in Lauderhill, FL.

Malone’s work has been featured on NPR’s All Things Considered, Morning Edition and Weekend Edition as well as APM’s Marketplace and The Story. His work has won national awards for religion, financial, crime and investigative reporting as well as three Best in Show Green Eyeshade Awards, the National Edward R. Murrow Award for use of sound, the National Headliner and PRNDI awards for series reporting, and the Scripps Howard Award for In-Depth Radio Reporting.

Malone lives in Miami Beach with his scruffy dog, Sir Xavier Charpentier III.

Ways to Connect

Kenny Malone

Grad student Torrey Smith didn’t really drink coffee before he started his master's in business administration at the University of Miami.

“Now I’ve had to try it a few times and step outside of my box because these long hours catch up to you,” the 26-year-old Smith says.

It’s not like Smith isn’t used to a high-stakes, rigorous schedule. He’s won a Super Bowl, caught 30 touchdown passes and just signed a $40 million contract with the San Francisco 49ers.

Kenny Malone

One way Miami Beach might prepare for the threat of rising sea levels is to elevate the whole city.

“The only tried and true solution to combating rising sea levels is to raise with it,” says Eric Carpenter, public works director for the City of Miami Beach.

As the city celebrates its centennial, the top-level engineer and Miami Beach resident spoke with WLRN about how sea-level rise will affect the city’s next 100 years.

fiaformulae.com

Sections of Biscayne Boulevard will be closed starting Friday morning in anticipation of the Miami ePrix, a 39-lap race that will send high-speed electric cars zipping along US-1, under I-395 and around American Airlines Arena.

Kenny Malone

I spent last Thursday, in the thick of afternoon rush hour, at the I-95 on-ramp just southwest of the Arsht Center. At around 4:30 p.m., the scene is one-half auto show, one-half salmon-spawning.

I walked from open window to open window hoping to confirm something I’ve always suspected: People don’t really know what the speed limit is on I-95. Even the people seconds away from driving on it.

Greg Castillo

At around 5 a.m. on March 5, 2011, five motorists were standing on the emergency shoulder of the Interstate 95 express lanes after a series of accidents.

"Meanwhile, a drunk driver entered the toll lanes. Speeding. Lost control," says attorney Edward Blumberg. "And then struck all five people... and hit them head on."

Four people died on the scene, the fifth died at Jackson Memorial Hospital, according to police records.

Kenny Malone

There is nothing worse than a three paragraph preamble to a listicle. So all you need to know for this, in case you haven’t been following our End of the Road series, is that WLRN spent the last year doing stories about the final 87 miles of Interstate 95 -- the South Florida stretch. We’ve learned some very useful/strange things along the way.

Please enjoy the following facts for personal use and distribution while attending local cocktail and dinner parties.

Florida Department of Transportation

Those poor, orange plastic poles didn’t stand a chance against Bliss Aruj. The 17-year-old had just started driving. She was cruising along “in” the I-95 express lanes.

“My mom goes, ‘Bliss! You’re hitting the cones!’” Bliss recalls. “I think I might have taken out about 20 of them in a row.”

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