Kenny Malone

Reporter

Kenny Malone hails from Meadville, PA where the zipper was invented, where Clark Gable’s mother is buried and where, in 2007, a wrecking ball broke free from a construction site, rolled down North Main Street and somehow wound up inside the trunk of a Ford Taurus sitting at a red light.

Malone graduated from Xavier University in Cincinnati, OH as a mathematics major and economics minor. He took an un-ironic oath to use mathematics for good not evil. Per that oath, Malone has taken on a wide array of non-evil numbers-based reporting endeavors -- everything from proving the existence of a home-field heat advantage for the Miami Dolphins to explaining South Florida’s economy in terms of automobiles on I-95 to exposing the extraordinary toll the densest cluster of assisted living facilities in the state had on both local authorities and the residents of those facilities in Lauderhill, FL.

Malone’s work has been featured on NPR’s All Things Considered, Morning Edition and Weekend Edition as well as APM’s Marketplace and The Story. His work has won national awards for religion, financial, crime and investigative reporting as well as three Best in Show Green Eyeshade Awards, the National Edward R. Murrow Award for use of sound, the National Headliner and PRNDI awards for series reporting, and the Scripps Howard Award for In-Depth Radio Reporting.

Malone lives in Miami Beach with his scruffy dog, Sir Xavier Charpentier III.

Ways To Connect

Graphic by Kenny Malone

Serendipity 3 on Lincoln Road, OTC in Brickell, Anthony’s Coal Fired Pizza just off the MacArthur Causeway and the 17-year-old Romeo’s Cafe in Coral Gables are among the 20-plus restaurants that have closed in the last few weeks.

One source told the Miami Herald it’s been a “bloodbath” in the Miami-Dade County food-and-beverage scene.

Jeffery Katz / Florida Department of Transportation

The Miami-Dade Expressway Authority voted unanimously Tuesday to approve a program that could give regular commuters a refund at the end of the year.

But like all rebates, there’s some fine print.

The new Cash Back Toll Dividend Program empowers MDX to refund users a percentage of their tolls if the organization happens to be running a budget surplus.

Miami Herald

The “cocaine cowboys” have come and gone, but their money laundering schemes have taken root and adapted.

In April, the U.S. Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) began special monitoring of about 700 Miami electronics exporters. The Geographic Targeting Order, GTO, was intended to help FinCEN learn more about a complicated process of legitimizing drug money known as trade-based money laundering.

While it’s a relatively new method of cleaning up dirty cash, the ultimate goal hasn’t changed: giving drug money a more palatable backstory.

Between the two, the Village of Bal Harbour and Glades County don't even have 16,000 residents. And yet, from 2009 to 2012, the Bal Harbour Police Department and the Glades County Sheriff's Office were behind an international, undercover money laundering sting operation that handled more than $55 million for drug cartels and other criminal organizations.

The state of Florida hadn't seen an operation of this magnitude in years.

Kenny Malone

A new soccer team in Miami, an FBI raid in Miami Beach and David Beckham’s Major League Soccer odyssey takes an American football turn. It's been a busy few weeks for South Florida soccer news.

Michelle Kaufman covers the beautiful game for the Miami Herald, so we asked her for the CliffsNotes summary of recent soccer events.

THE MIAMI CONNECTION

CVS

Cafecito, bilingual staff, money transfer services, an expanded discount fragrance counter. But wait -- “y más.”

CVS has launched 12 “CVS/pharmacy y más” stores in South Florida. In Miami, Hialeah, Doral, Homestead and Kendall, CVS says it has converted 11 existing locations and added a brand-new store to launch its Hispanic-centric store concept.

This comes less than a year after the Rhode Island-based giant bought Miami-based Navarro Discount Pharmacy, touted as the largest Hispanic-owned drugstore chain in the country.

Broward County Sheriff's Office

Heather Hironimus has filed suit, gone into hiding and, ultimately, wound up in jail trying to stop her 4-and-a-half-year-old son's circumcision. The Sun Sentinel reports the South Florida mother dropped her federal lawsuit Wednesday.

In 2012, Heather Hironimus and her son's father, Dennis Nebus, signed a parenting plan that included an agreement to have their son circumcised.

Florida Department of Transportation

The Interstate 95 express lanes are advancing to the north. This week, workers began installing more plastic poles on northbound I-95, part of the “Phase 2” construction that will eventually extend the lanes into Broward County.

While the Florida Department of Transportation plans to expand both northbound and southbound express lanes to Davie Boulevard, the current construction is only on the northbound lanes and will stop at the Broward County line.

Newscasts from May 8, 2015:

Kenny Malone / WLRN

In the middle of the night, Brenda Shapiro woke up and thought: “LibbyLicious.” The prefect name for a small baking business built from a mandelbread recipe handed down by her husband’s grandmother, Grandma Libby.

Unfortunately, the South Florida baker did not wake up with a social media strategy.

“This is why I have my daughter-in-law do this for me,” Shapiro says. “I’m busy baking, delivering, packaging, going out and selling my cookies myself. I’m a one-person show.”

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