Kenny Malone


Kenny Malone hails from Meadville, PA where the zipper was invented, where Clark Gable’s mother is buried and where, in 2007, a wrecking ball broke free from a construction site, rolled down North Main Street and somehow wound up inside the trunk of a Ford Taurus sitting at a red light.

Malone graduated from Xavier University in Cincinnati, OH as a mathematics major and economics minor. He took an un-ironic oath to use mathematics for good not evil. Per that oath, Malone has taken on a wide array of non-evil numbers-based reporting endeavors -- everything from proving the existence of a home-field heat advantage for the Miami Dolphins to explaining South Florida’s economy in terms of automobiles on I-95 to exposing the extraordinary toll the densest cluster of assisted living facilities in the state had on both local authorities and the residents of those facilities in Lauderhill, FL.

Malone’s work has been featured on NPR’s All Things Considered, Morning Edition and Weekend Edition as well as APM’s Marketplace and The Story. His work has won national awards for religion, financial, crime and investigative reporting as well as three Best in Show Green Eyeshade Awards, the National Edward R. Murrow Award for use of sound, the National Headliner and PRNDI awards for series reporting, and the Scripps Howard Award for In-Depth Radio Reporting.

Malone lives in Miami Beach with his scruffy dog, Sir Xavier Charpentier III.

Ways To Connect

Graphic by Kenny Malone. Beach and pumpkin images from Flickr users Jorge Brazil and Kam Abbot (respectively) per CC license.

Wednesday may technically be the first day of fall, but it certainly doesn't feel any different.

In South Florida, according to the National Weather Service, "fall-like weather is usually delayed by about 4-6 weeks from the start of fall."

Courtesy St. Thomas University. Image appears in "The Catholic University of Havana" by Fr. John J. Kelly

In 1961, a year before St. Thomas University in Miami Gardens opened as Biscayne College, the school's founding president, Fr. Edward McCarthy, was in prison. 

"With people with machine guns, submachine guns, following our every move," he said in a 1989 interview with St. Thomas University professor Richard Raleigh, of the auditorium-turned-prison in Havana, Cuba where he was being held.

C.M. Guerrero / El Nuevo Herald

A new program called Operation Toll Relief will give Miami-Dade County residents a chance to negotiate down fines from unpaid tolls.

The program is a partnership of the Miami-Dade Expressway Authority, the Florida Department of Transportation and the Miami-Dade court system.

"The program does not excuse toll violators," says Judge Sam Slom, the chief administrative judge over county court. "What the program seeks to do is to adjust the amount due for those violations to an amount which we perceive to be fair."

Pests and Diseases Image Library,

Officials met with farmers in southern Miami-Dade County Wednesday to explain the latest on a potentially devastating invasive fruit fly outbreak.

“It all began Aug. 17, over in the Palmetto Bay municipality.  We found one male Oriental fruit fly," the USDA's Abbie Fox told roughly 100 growers, landscapers and homeowners who had crammed into a small conference room in Homestead.


The Oriental fruit fly can use all kinds of plants as  hosts, including important local crops like avocados and tomatoes.

Alyce and Neil Robertson / Courtesy

There are details of this story that Alyce and Neil Robertson don’t quite agree on.

“We were on our way to a wedding on a Saturday afternoon,” recalls Alyce.

“A Sunday, yeah,” recalls Neil, “we were on our way to a wedding.”

This Saturday (or Sunday) wedding trip roughly 20 (or 30) years ago has become a go-to party story for the Robertsons, who can at least agree that they were disagreeing at the time.

Kenny Malone / Flag photo: Lindsay Shaver Creative Commons

Maybe Barry White missed his calling.

In a new study, potential voters inherently favored political candidates with lower-pitched voices.

“We’re not saying that this is the Holy Grail of how we understand how voting works, but it’s in there somewhere as something that affects how we vote,” says Dr. Rindy Anderson, a biologist at Florida Atlantic University and one of three authors on the study.

C.M. Guerrero / El Nuevo Herald Staff

Regular commuters have until the end of the day Monday to register for the Miami-Dade Expressway Authority’s new toll reimbursement program.

The Cash Back Toll Dividend Program allows MDX to give some commuters a percentage of their tolls back if the organization is running a budget surplus.

“There’s definitely going to be a dividend declared,” says MDX spokesman Mario Diaz. “What we’re looking at is, and we have to finalize those numbers and the board has to finalize, but it appears that it’ll be somewhere around $3 million this year.”

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

It would have been tough to beat June’s housing numbers, a month when Miami-Dade County set an all-time record for single-family home sales.

While South Florida as a whole saw a slight drop compared to June, July’s sales were still about 14-percent higher than July last year, according to a report from Florida Realtors.

Kenny Malone / WLRN

Dr. Edward “Gilly” Evans does not hide his avocado bias.

“I mean, if you’re really an avocado eater then a ‘green-skin’ avocado is the way to go,” says the University of Florida agricultural economist.

America may have fallen in love with avocado, but it has not fallen for Florida’s avocado just yet. The Sunshine State specializes in what’s called the green-skin avocado. It comes in all kinds of shapes and sizes, but generally speaking, green-skins are bigger, a brighter green and have smoother skin than the Hass variety of avocado.

Ginger Photography Inc. / Locust Projects

A group of Florida teens is embracing their inner "Florida Man" with an art exhibition at Miami's Locust Projects which, every summer for the last six years, has handed its gallery over to high-schoolers for the Locust Arts Builders program.