Kenny Malone

Reporter

Kenny Malone hails from Meadville, PA where the zipper was invented, where Clark Gable’s mother is buried and where, in 2007, a wrecking ball broke free from a construction site, rolled down North Main Street and somehow wound up inside the trunk of a Ford Taurus sitting at a red light.

Malone graduated from Xavier University in Cincinnati, OH as a mathematics major and economics minor. He took an un-ironic oath to use mathematics for good not evil. Per that oath, Malone has taken on a wide array of non-evil numbers-based reporting endeavors -- everything from proving the existence of a home-field heat advantage for the Miami Dolphins to explaining South Florida’s economy in terms of automobiles on I-95 to exposing the extraordinary toll the densest cluster of assisted living facilities in the state had on both local authorities and the residents of those facilities in Lauderhill, FL.

Malone’s work has been featured on NPR’s All Things Considered, Morning Edition and Weekend Edition as well as APM’s Marketplace and The Story. His work has won national awards for religion, financial, crime and investigative reporting as well as three Best in Show Green Eyeshade Awards, the National Edward R. Murrow Award for use of sound, the National Headliner and PRNDI awards for series reporting, and the Scripps Howard Award for In-Depth Radio Reporting.

Malone lives in Miami Beach with his scruffy dog, Sir Xavier Charpentier III.

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Wilson Sayre / WLRN

It would have been tough to beat June’s housing numbers, a month when Miami-Dade County set an all-time record for single-family home sales.

While South Florida as a whole saw a slight drop compared to June, July’s sales were still about 14-percent higher than July last year, according to a report from Florida Realtors.

Kenny Malone / WLRN

Dr. Edward “Gilly” Evans does not hide his avocado bias.

“I mean, if you’re really an avocado eater then a ‘green-skin’ avocado is the way to go,” says the University of Florida agricultural economist.

America may have fallen in love with avocado, but it has not fallen for Florida’s avocado just yet. The Sunshine State specializes in what’s called the green-skin avocado. It comes in all kinds of shapes and sizes, but generally speaking, green-skins are bigger, a brighter green and have smoother skin than the Hass variety of avocado.

Ginger Photography Inc. / Locust Projects

A group of Florida teens is embracing their inner "Florida Man" with an art exhibition at Miami's Locust Projects which, every summer for the last six years, has handed its gallery over to high-schoolers for the Locust Arts Builders program.

Frankie Leon / Flickr

A new study says South Floridians are swimming in credit card debt. Maybe drowning in it.

CreditCards.com, a self-described “online credit card marketplace,” looked at average debt versus median income for 25 major metropolitan areas to determine a region’s credit card debt burden.

The Miami metropolitan area had the fourth worst debt burden in the country.

Al Diaz / Miami Herald

Gov. Rick Scott’s Commission on Healthcare and Hospital Funding’s “Spotlight Transparency Tour” made its last scheduled stop Thursday at Miami-Dade College’s Medical Campus.

Miami Herald

Miami Herald investigative reporter Michael Sallah was tipped off by a mysterious text message.

"It was... night and all of a sudden I get a text photograph of three notebooks under a desk," he told WLRN in an interview. "And I was told that these were in the [village of Bal Harbour] police department and that I had never seen these records before."

C.M. Guerrero / El Nuevo Herald Staff

Regular commuters have the next month and a half to register for the Miami-Dade Expressway Authority’s new toll reimbursement program.

The Cash Back Toll Dividend Program allows MDX to give some commuters a percentage of their tolls back if the organization is running a budget surplus.


“There’s definitely going to be a dividend declared,” says MDX spokesman Mario Diaz. “What we’re looking at is, and we have to finalize those numbers and the board has to finalize, but it appears that it’ll be somewhere around $3 million this year.”

Kenny Malone / WLRN

In a warehouse loading dock just north of Doral, supporters chanted “C-L-C” as Florida Lieutenant Governor Carlos Lopez-Cantera announced his run for U.S. Senate.


"I ask for your commitment to ensure that Washington D.C. works for Florida again," the 41-year-old Republican told a small crowd.

Kenny Malone / WLRN

From a Volkswagen Beetle to a big-rig, dozens of vehicles lined up in the parking lot of a Loxahatchee strip mall on Saturday to parade the Confederate flag around northern Palm Beach County.

“I wanted to show that not everybody that wants to display the rebel flag is racist,” says rally organizer Taylor Mosier.

Graphic by Kenny Malone

It may be the day the classical music died, but Classical South Florida listeners still have no official word that three local radio stations have been sold to a California-based religious broadcasting company.

Current, a public media trade publication, reports that the Minnesota-based American Public Media Group is selling Classical South Florida's stations to the Education Media Foundation for $21.7 million.

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