Kate Stein

Reporter

Kate Stein can't quite explain what attracts her to South Florida. It's more than just the warm weather (although this Wisconsin native and Northwestern University graduate definitely appreciates the South Florida sunshine). It has a lot to do with being able to travel from the Everglades to Little Havana to Brickell without turning off 8th Street. It's also related to Stein's fantastic coworkers, whom she first got to know during a winter 2016 internship.

Officially, Stein is WLRN's environment, data and transportation journalist. Privately, she uses her job as an excuse to rove around South Florida searching for stories à la Carl Hiaasen and Edna Buchanan. Regardless, Stein speaks Spanish and is always thrilled to run, explore and read. 

Ways to Connect

Kate Stein / WLRN

 

What if 30 percent of Miami-Dade County were shaded by trees? What would that look like? Is that something we’d really want?

Yes! says County Commissioner Dennis Moss. He heads the county’s Million Trees initiative.

 

"The trees are there, and they basically provide shade and they cool the community," Moss said. "When you have trees in the area, children are more inclined to go out and play."

 

Tom Hudson / WLRN

Water, water everywhere, but a lot of it’s contaminated.

That’s a theme of World Water Day 2017, which took place Wednesday. It extends to South Florida, where high phosphorus levels in the Everglades contribute to harmful algae blooms and cattails that dominate native sawgrass.

Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission

Seagrass in Florida Bay has died off rapidly over the past couple of years. About 40,000 acres have been lost, harming the habitat of animals from manatees to toadfish and imperiling the area's fishing industry.

Kate Stein / WLRN

Artist Jenna Efrein loves the Everglades. Since moving to South Florida, she's spent a lot of time exploring the ecosystem and learning about the challenges it faces. That passion -- and 10 years of gymnastics experience -- have shaped an installation of her work on display now at the Wynwood Building.

Patrick Ferrell / Miami Herald

When it comes to the future of greater Miami, what worries you most? And what is the region doing well?

 

Kate Stein / WLRN

The Tamil word for python is "malaippāmpu." Translated literally, it means "mountain snake."

But two Tamil-speaking snake trackers from India, who are in South Florida to help with the region's python problem, think "water snake" would be a more appropriate name.

Kate Stein / WLRN

If you scoop a glassful of water from the heart of the Everglades, that water is as pure and clear as the water that flows from your tap.

That’s because chances are good your tap water comes from the Everglades.

One in three Floridians -- more than eight million of us -- gets drinking water from the Biscayne Aquifer a few feet below the southeastern Everglades. The ecosystem acts as a natural filter, removing excess nutrients and keeping out seawater.

Kate Stein / WLRN

Let’s start with what we’re losing: 

One of the most biologically diverse places on Earth, from sawgrass to cypress trees, apple snails to alligators. The historic home of Florida’s Miccosukee and Seminole tribes. A national park.

The ecosystem that ensures fresh drinking water for more than 8 million Floridians.

Everglades advocate Marjory Stoneman Douglas talked about all this in an interview in 1983.

USGS, via Wikimedia Commons

A proposal to build a water storage reservoir south of Lake Okeechobee could create more than 39,000 jobs, according to a study released Tuesday by the Everglades Foundation.

Kate Stein / WLRN

Thousands of people took to the streets of Miami late Friday with Cuban flags, pots and pans, cafecitos and cigars in reaction to the announcement of the death of Fidel Castro by the Cuban government


Katie Lepri / WLRN

 

Santiago Cueto’s a lawyer from Coral Gables. But this election season he’s moved into a new business: cereal.

It started with questions from his 8-year-old daughter, Hannah. Questions like: Does Trump really hate Mexicans? Does Hillary Clinton really lie all the time? So Cueto, Hannah and Cueto's wife, Giselle, started looking on the internet to answer some of those questions.

 

"We came across some products, I think some hats or whatnot," Cueto said, "and she [Hannah] had the idea to make some cereal."

Pedro Portal / Miami Herald

Marco Rubio and Patrick Murphy were quick to dig into each other’s resumes on stage at the second U.S. Senate debate on Wednesday night. 

A recent poll from Real Clear Politics says the race is close. Rubio has a 3.6 percentage point lead over Murphy, 47 to 43.4.

But the focus at the debate at Broward County’s main campus two weeks before the Nov. 8 election was personal attacks, not numbers. 

Kyle Holsten / WLRN

One of Hillary Clinton’s messages was clear even before the candidate took the stage Tuesday in Coconut Creek.

‘Vote Early’ -- with a Florida orange for the ‘o’ -- hung above the risers behind the podium where the Democratic presidential candidate would speak.

“I feel good, but boy, I’m not taking anything for granted,” Clinton said, addressing an enthusiastic audience of about 1,750 people at Broward College North Campus. “[This election] it’s so important for Florida -- there are so many issues we need to draw attention to.”

Kate Stein / WLRN

On the first day of early voting in Miami-Dade County, about 200 people turned out to hear Democratic vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine campaign for Hillary Clinton.

Speaking on the lawn outside of the Graham University Center at Florida International University (FIU), Kaine tackled topics from Donald Trump’s campaign to immigration reform. He urged attendees to vote.

“We kind of like the polls right now... but I'm here to tell you this one thing: we can't take anything for granted," Kaine said.

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