Kate Stein

Reporter

Kate Stein can't quite explain what attracts her to South Florida. It's more than just the warm weather (although this Wisconsin native and Northwestern University graduate definitely appreciates the South Florida sunshine). It has a lot to do with being able to travel from the Everglades to Little Havana to Brickell without turning off 8th Street. It's also related to Stein's fantastic coworkers, whom she first got to know during a winter 2016 internship.

Officially, Stein is WLRN's environment, data and transportation journalist. Privately, she uses her job as an excuse to rove around South Florida searching for stories à la Carl Hiaasen and Edna Buchanan. Regardless, Stein speaks Spanish and is always thrilled to run, explore and read. 

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Miami Herald file photo

Mayor Carlos Gimenez last year was a big supporter of the Miami-Dade County SMART Plan to build trains along six high-traffic travel corridors. But the mayor recently changed his position.

Kate Stein / WLRN

A chemical used for mosquito control in South Florida has been the source of controversy in recent weeks, after a study showed it could be linked to developmental delays in infants.

Kyle Holsten / WLRN

When he had a landscaping business, Bob Hartmann grew 200,000 orchids and thousands of other plants on his three acres in Southwest Ranches, about 15 miles southwest of Fort Lauderdale.

 


Ted Murphy / Flickr

Planning to have a baby in the Miami metro area? You’d better do it fast.

A study released Thursday says that of the 50 largest U.S. cities, Miami is the fourth most likely to face a shortage of obstetricians and gynecologists in the coming years.

Analysts say the number of OB/GYNs -- doctors who deliver babies and treat women of all ages -- isn’t growing fast enough to keep up with the growing U.S. population. That’s because many OB/GYNs are approaching retirement age, but not so many med students are entering the field to replace them.

Emily Michot / Miami Herald

What's the smartest way for Miami-Dade to address its excruciating traffic problems?

 

Not the trains in the $3.3-billion SMART (Strategic Miami Area Rapid Transit) Plan the county rolled out just last year, according to Mayor Carlos Gimenez.

Allison Light / Light

The case counts are low, but Zika's still a threat.

That was the message of a meeting of county and state mosquito control officials Monday in Doral.

Gustavo Rodriguez

In certain circles, people from the Netherlands inevitably get asked about sea level rise.

It's because for hundreds of years the country has had to keep out seawater and prevent flooding from its numerous rivers.

Kyle Holsten / WLRN News

A federal judge has dismissed a request to stop aerial spraying of the pesticide Naled in Miami-Dade County, describing the plaintiffs' complaint as "poor" and recommending they get a lawyer before pursuing further legal action.

Logan Riely / Miami Herald

Last year, the pesticide Naled was one of several tools officials used to control mosquitoes that carry the Zika virus. Dr. Michael Hall was one of many Miami Beach residents who protested, saying Naled exposure leads to symptoms like headaches and nausea. He and other protesters also expressed fears the pesticide could have longer-term health effects.

Windsor Johnson / NPR

Climate change is going to cause disproportionate economic harm to parts of the United States that are already pretty hot, according to a study published in the journal Science.

The study by scientists and economists from the Climate Impact Lab suggests rising temperatures could increase a national income gap.

Logan Riely / Miami Herald

Weeks after a study linked a pesticide used for mosquito control to slight motor delays in babies, officials in Miami-Dade and Palm Beach counties say they plan to use that pesticide in aerial spraying scheduled in the coming week.

Daniel Bock / Miami Herald

Biscayne Bay used to be a subtropical paradise with clear water and colorful coral. But urbanization and population growth have polluted the water and imperiled fish, birds, manatees and plants, particularly seagrass.  

Marc Averette via Wikimedia Commons

Biscayne Bay is in trouble. Biologists say about 21 square miles of its seagrass have died off in the past decade. 

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