Kate Stein

Reporter

Kate Stein can't quite explain what attracts her to South Florida. It's more than just the warm weather (although this Wisconsin native and Northwestern University graduate definitely appreciates the South Florida sunshine). It has a lot to do with being able to travel from the Everglades to Little Havana to Brickell without turning off 8th Street. It's also related to Stein's fantastic coworkers, whom she first got to know during a winter 2016 internship.

Officially, Stein is WLRN's environment, data and transportation journalist. Privately, she uses her job as an excuse to rove around South Florida searching for stories à la Carl Hiaasen and Edna Buchanan. Regardless, Stein speaks Spanish and is always thrilled to run, explore and read. 

Ways to Connect

Kate Stein / WLRN

Palm Beach County's prized natural areas -- protected areas of dunes, wetlands, scrub and flatwood forests -- could lose money for maintenance in the next few years because of changes to funding sources.

Charles Trainor Jr. / Miami Herald

The superintendent of Broward County schools said a campus cop's decision not to enter the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School building where a shooter killed 17 on Feb. 14 was "inexcusable" and "despicable."

Referring to school resource officer Scot Peterson, Robert Runcie told reporters gathered outside the school on Friday morning: "I wish he had the same kind of courage that our teachers that have showed up here today have."

Leslie Ovalle / WLRN

At the request of Florida's governor, mental health experts, educators and law enforcement professionals met Tuesday in Tallahassee at workshops following last week’s school shooting.

The main goal of these gatherings is to identify measures that can be taken before the end of the legislative session to improve safety in schools, gun control and resources for mental health. The last day of the session is March 9.

Kate Stein / WLRN

Students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School are organizing protests pushing for legislative action on guns and mental health.

One protest is scheduled for Wednesday in Tallahassee. It will be the 43rd day of the regular legislative session. The high schoolers say they’re going to push state legislators to revise gun laws before the scheduled end of the law-writing session in three weeks.

Kate Stein / WLRN

The first funerals for students killed in the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School were held on Friday.

Al Diaz / Miami Herald

Following Wednesday's shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School, many organizations have offered mental health support for people struggling with the trauma and grief. WLRN has compiled a list of resources and will periodically update this collection.  

Counseling services will be available "to anyone, especially students and families" at the following sites:

• Pines Trails Park Recreation Center and Amphitheater, 10555 Trails End, Parkland, FL 33076

• Coral Springs Gymnasium, 2501 Coral Springs Drive, Coral Springs, FL 33065

Mac Stone Photography

Wood storks, roseate spoonbills, ibises and egrets are among the many birds that fly, paddle and wade through the Everglades.

They draw visitors, particularly photographers, to the ecosystem. But the Everglades' birds are important for another reason: The health of wading bird communities says a lot about progress on Everglades restoration.

Kate Stein / WLRN

Scientists have long known that climate change is threatening the Everglades. But outdoor enthusiasts and environmental advocates have often looked at the two as separate issues.

Leonardo Sagnotti / via Flickr

If you own a house in South Florida, you might want to start thinking hard about sea level rise.

The ocean here could rise a foot or more in the next 30 years -- the amount of time in a mortgage cycle -- according to University of Miami professor Harold Wanless and other researchers.  That means if you buy a house today, and rising seas put your house at risk for flooding, your property value might decrease... but your mortgage payments won’t.

WINDSOR JOHNSON / NPR

South Florida could see two feet or more of sea level rise in the next forty years, according to a joint projection by Palm Beach, Broward, Miami-Dade and Monroe counties.

JAYME GERSHEN/EVE MOSHER/FLICKR

Maybe you're wondering how bad the threat is.

Maybe you're curious if you're going to see serious sea-level rise in your lifetime.

Maybe you just want to know: Is climate change a real thing?

WLRN

A state senator and congressional candidate says it’s time for Florida to have a unified strategy for sea-level rise.

To make his point this legislative session, he’s wearing rain boots in the Senate.

Alex Gonzalez / WLRN News

It doesn't have a name or colors, but Miami's long-awaited professional soccer team has an anthem.

Pages