Jordan Levin

Miami Herald Arts and Entertainment Reporter

Jordan Levin has been an arts and entertainment reporter and critic at the Miami Herald since 1999, covering dance and performance, Latin and pop music, and cultural features. Since 2010 she has been writing and producing radio features for WLRN-Miami Herald News, two of which aired on NPR. As a freelancer, she has written for the Los Angeles Times, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, and Latina, Billboard and Ocean Drive magazines, among others. Before turning to journalism, she was a dancer/performer in New York City and an arts presenter in Miami.

Ways To Connect

Charles Trainor Jr. / Miami Herald

The broad lawn at the Deering Estate at Cutler runs gently downhill to meet Biscayne Bay, washing up between two massive, palm lined jetties to be greeted, on this bright afternoon, by a mass of young people. They flood across the grass, arms and bodies rippling as they surge into lines and circles and lifts in a dance that looks like both prayer and invocation.

“Keep it alive!” exhorts their director, the Miami choreographer Dale Andree, striding the grass in baseball cap and jeans. “You care about it! This is important!”

Stanislav Preska / Associated Press

Julio Iglesias spends much of his time in the air these days, crisscrossing the globe in his private plane to sing in concerts from Singapore to Transylvania. But for the several months of the year he is at his home in Indian Creek, an exclusive island enclave just off Surfside, his circle is much smaller.

Carl Juste / Miami Herald

In many ways, Geoffrey Royce Rojas is like millions of other young Latino Americans. He was raised by Dominican parents who came to New York looking for the American dream and struggled to keep their four children out of trouble in a South Bronx neighborhood rife with gangs and drugs.
 

  Rojas, 24, grew up listening to techno and hip-hop, the Beatles and Jay-Z — and to the sweet, bouncy lilt of Dominican bachata at home and on summer visits to the Dominican Republic. He is matter-of-fact about balancing between two cultures.

When she was 8 years old, Natalie Cole went to Mexico City with her father. And while Nat King Cole’s daughter was accustomed to his stardom, she was startled by the adulation he received.

“The people thronged to see him as we were walking the streets — he was like a king,” says Cole, leaning back on a sofa at a Wynwood music studio last week.

It was her first trip to Mexico, but the city’s plazas and her first piñata were less memorable than the crowds’ enthusiasm.

Charles Trainor Jr./Miami Herald Staff

The only instrument you notice walking into Juanes' sun-dappled home on Key Biscayne is an upright piano, covered with lesson books for his daughter Paloma, 7, who on this weekday morning is sprawled on a sofa, along with siblings Luna, 9, and Dante, 3, in pajama-clad, spring-break bliss.

The 19 Grammy Awards, racks of guitars and other trappings of the 40-year-old Colombian rock star's career are in his recording studio upstairs.

Richard Fendelman

Hundreds of Miami-Dade middle and high school students listened to “Two Pianos” by Morton Gould. Afterwards, they wrote poems inspired by the music.  It was part of a contest called the Piano Slam.  The point is to inspire young people, using classical music, to create their own forms of artistic expression.

Telo Catch You

Feb 7, 2013

“Telo Catch You” was about Brazilian pop singer Michel Telo, whose viral, global hit “Ai Se Eu Te Pego” (Ay, If I Catch You) was booming around the world when Telo came to Miami to perform on the Billboard Latin Music Awards in late April. The Brazilian community in Miami is one of Miami’s fastest-growing and biggest immigrant communities, but it is also a recent presence in the city with little connection to the rest of Miami’s ethnic groups.

 

There are two things that drive Art Basel Miami Beach: passion for art and financial wheeling and dealing. The   organizers of one of the world's top art fairs cater to VIP's in ways that range from party invitations to private tours.  Retired attorney Frank Herzog led a group of potential buyers through the fair, taking them from abstract expressionism to minimalism, pop art, and what he thinks could be the next big thing. 

Jordan Levin

The endless election season is enough to turn anyone cynical about politics. But for a group of female South Dade migrant workers, the idea of democracy is still a wonder.

They've been exploring it at a dance workshop sponsored by Miami-Dade College and the South Miami Dade Cultural Arts Center. It’s part of the “Are We Democracy” workshop in Cutler Bay. The program was created by the New York dance troupe Urban Bush Women. The idea is to make democracy personal and concrete for everyone.

Carl Juste / Miami Herald

On an icy night in late December, Miami native Robert Battle, the new artistic director of the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, saw his past and future come together in the heart of New York City.

After a year and a half of public grooming, of working alongside his towering predecessor, Judith Jamison, Battle was finally at the head of modern dance's most famous company, and in programming the troupe's annual five-week season at City Center Theatre, a major event in the New York dance world, he had made his real debut as director.