Gina Jordan

Tallahassee reporter

Gina Jordan reports from Tallahassee for WUSF and WLRN about how state policy affects your life.

Jason Parker/Flickr

The biggest game in sports is coming back to South Florida. The Miami Dolphins will host the Super Bowl in 2020, celebrating a century of the NFL. But is this Miami’s game - or is it South Florida's game? Should the branding leave out Broward County?

WLRN

This week on The Florida Roundup: the White House directive to school districts about transgender students, political in-fighting among Democrats, the mobilization of Latino voters, and the Zika funding feud.

Kyle Pegolo/flickr

A new poll is out that looks at the attitudes of Miamians on numerous issues. The poll was commissioned by WLRN, el Nuevo Herald, the Miami Herald, and Univision 23.

Ccb621/flickr

Two big news stories in Miami-Dade County this past week will impact transportation and the homeless. The federal program for housing cut millions of dollars that Miami-Dade programs were counting on in homeless funding. Up to 700 beds for homeless people are at risk.

Miami Herald

We begin The Florida Roundup with corruption in Opa-locka. The Miami Herald uncovered a months-long investigation by the FBI that includes extortion and bribery in the city involving a commissioner, the city manager and a former cop.

everydayplus/FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Cuba has changed its policy and will allow anyone born there to return to the island on a cruise ship or merchant vessel. Carnival had threatened to postpone its maiden voyage from Miami to Cuba if the rule wasn’t changed.

El Nuevo Herald

The Florida Roundup looks at Carnival’s Cuba controversy, management trouble at Broward Health, and modified mosquitoes in the Keys.

Cruise giant Carnival faces a lawsuit and protests over its plans to sail from Miami to Cuba starting May 1st - and its willingness to follow Cuban law by not allowing Cuban-born Americans to cruise.

Oxitec

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has extended the public comment period to May 13 on a proposed field trial in the Florida Keys. The trial involves the release of a thousand genetically modified mosquitoes.

It would be the first such trial in the U.S. by Oxitec, a British company that genetically alters the males in the Aedes aegypti species. The modification causes the offspring of these males to die quickly.

Washington Post

Two presidential debates are coming to Miami this week.

Republican candidates will debate at the University of Miami Thursday night. But first, Democrats will take the stage Wednesday night at the Kendall campus of Miami Dade College.

Twenty-one mayors – most of them from South Florida – sent a letter to the moderators for both debates. The mayors want the candidates to explain how they plan to deal with climate change and sea level rise.

Gina Jordan/WLRN

House minority leader Mark Pafford, D-West Palm Beach, is finishing up his last regular legislative session.

He's leaving because of term limits. "This process is better when you have new minds and fresh ideas," Pafford says. For the record, he doesn't like term limits and calls his departure an "involuntary constitutional resignation." 

Valters Boze/flickr

A climate change litmus test has been circulating around Tallahassee. The man behind the test wants to get lawmakers and other state leaders on the record about their feelings regarding climate change and the risk to Florida.

Flickr

The Internet allows savvy consumers to comparison shop for big ticket items. Those items may soon include medical procedures.

The Florida House is ready to consider a bill (HB 1175) that would enable consumers to see what hospitals around the state charge for similar surgeries and courses of treatment.

 

Linnette Vasquez/flickr

It's a Valentine’s Day edition of the Florida Roundup featuring husband-and-wife media teams.

The Florida legislative session is at its midpoint. The death penalty remains on the agenda. The House and Senate are split over whether juries should agree unanimously in capital punishment cases.

Dale/flickr

The Florida Roundup looks at the death penalty, heavy rains, fracking and more this week.

The Florida Supreme Court stopped one execution as questions continue around the process of how Florida decides the death penalty. Dozens of inmates on death row could challenge their sentences.

South Florida is being drenched by historic rains in the midst of what is supposed to be the dry season. Lake Okeechobee is swollen, sending dirty water into rivers and raising worries about pollution.

Lightblb on Flickr

Hundreds of thousands of registered voters in Florida are being asked to update their signatures.

If the signature on an absentee ballot doesn’t match what the elections office has on file, the vote can be tossed out.

Miami-Dade Supervisor of Elections Penelope Townsley sent letters to nearly 200,000 voters who have previously requested ballots by mail.

Steve Bousquet in the Herald/Times Tallahassee Bureau says absentee voting has become so popular that an effort is underway to re-name it.

Pages