Daylina Miller

Daylina Miller, multimedia reporter for Health News Florida, was hired to help further expand health coverage statewide.

She began her journalism career as a teen columnist on the Tampa Tribune's first board of community columnists in 2005 and has since worked as a reporter in various capacities for several Tampa Bay news organizations.

Daylina is a graduate of the University of South Florida's School of Mass Communications, where she started the school's Her Campus Magazine branch, served as a correspondent for USA Today College and wrote opinion columns for The Oracle.

She received her master's degree in New Media Journalism at Full Sail University and through the program started Dames & Dice, a tabletop gaming blog focused on feminist issues.

Role-playing games like "Dungeons and Dragons" have risen in popularity in recent years, even being featured on hit shows like Netflix's "Stranger Things." But a Tampa Bay area mental health therapist is putting a new spin on it.

Earlier this year, the Florida Legislature amended state statutes to phase out waiver programs that allow people with special needs to get Medicaid who wouldn't normally qualify for services.

Daylina Miller / Health News Florida

Thousands of Floridians living with AIDS could be losing financial assistance they say is essential to living a normal life, and some AIDS groups are worried the state won't carry through on its promises.

On a hot, sunny Saturday morning at the Upper Tampa Bay Regional Public Library, Kathy and Dani Dahlberg walk up to a white truck holding portable fish tanks that emit a loud hum.

The new homeowners are trying to describe the size of their pond to Hillsborough County Mosquito Control officials.

With more than 200 protesters gathered outside the Hilton St. Petersburg Carillon, Sen. Marco Rubio took the stage Friday night at a donor dinner.

Florida's universities call it a troubling trend. The need for mental health counseling services among students has gone up nearly 50 percent over the past five years.

During a recent trip to the pharmacy, Tampa resident Michael Ruppal was told his medication was no longer covered. He has another month until his annual health insurance contract is up for renewal or cancelation.

More Americans are living longer and surviving chronic conditions like heart disease and cancer but that’s led to rising number of neurological disorders, which disproportionately affect the elderly.

A new report from University of South Florida researchers has estimated just how much money those disorders are costing patients and the health care industry -- nearly $800 billion a year.

When it comes to keeping people out of the hospital, Florida didn't score so well on new scorecard that pits state health care systems against one another.

"The Commonwealth Fund" report gave Florida a rank of 45 out of 50 states, plus Washington D.C., when it came to the "Avoiding hospital use and cost" indicator. That's a drop of 13 points between 2012 and 2015. 

Michael Phillips is a 36-year-old Tampa resident who enjoys Starbucks coffee, watching movies and hanging out with his friends.

“Hey, hey! Ho, ho! Sabal Trail has got to go…”

About 50 protesters in downtown Tampa in November chanted as they marched up and down Ashley Drive with signs that said "Protect our water" and "Solidarity with Standing Rock." This protest is one of many that have sprung up across Florida since construction began on the Sabal Trail Transmission Pipeline last summer.

No law in Florida prevents health insurance companies from changing the cost of a patient's prescription drugs -or from dropping coverage all together of that drug - in the middle of a 12-month contract.

But a bill filed in the Florida legislature forces insurers to stick by those contracts.

U.S. Rep. Gus Bilirakis held his third public listening session on health care reform in Wesley Chapel on Wednesday night.

The Florida Department of Health held workshops across the state this week to get input from the public about how best to implement Amendment 2, which expands the use of medical marijuana.

Florida voters passed it last November, but state officials are still trying to work out regulations.

Walgreens is teaming up with Florida Hospital Tampa to put health clinics inside drug stores around the Tampa Bay area. 

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