Daniel Rivero

Reporter

Daniel Rivero is a reporter and producer for WLRN, covering Latino and criminal justice issues. Before joining the team, he was an investigative reporter and producer on the television series "The Naked Truth," and a digital reporter for Fusion.

His work has won honors of the Murrow Awards, Sunshine State Awards and Green Eyeshade Awards. He has also been nominated for a Livingston Award and a GLAAD Award on reporting on the background of EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt's tenure as Attorney General of Oklahoma and on the Orlando nightclub shooting, respectively.

Daniel was born on the outskirts of Washington D.C. to Cuban parents, and moved to Miami full time twenty years ago. He learned to walk with a wiffle ball bat and has been a skateboarder since the age of ten.

Ways to Connect

Follow the chatter around our Florida Roundup Presidential Special LIVE from Lynn University in Boca Raton!

Join in the conversation by tweeting to us with hashtag #lynndebate

Can you feel that change in the air?  Never mind the fact that the seasons in Miami are mostly a social construct, the art season is upon us.

While we remain hopeful for a significant temperature drop in mid-October, novelist Tom Wolfe is forecasted to drop his latest work Back to Blood on October 23rd.  Set in Miami, the novel explores the multi-ethnic urban jungle of South Florida - and all the perceived class struggles that entails.

Missed the Tell Me More radio special yesterday? No worries: the education reform debate continues online.  

NPR's news-talk program Tell Me More was in the WLRN studios with StateImpact Florida all day for an extensive discussion on education in America. 

Slideshow: NPR's Tell Me More And WLRN Partner For Live Tweet-Up

Oct 10, 2012

All photos by Ben Guzman

Since early September, #NPRedchat has allowed us to take a deeper look at education and explore ways of engaging not only with our radio audience, but with the digital public on Twitter as well.  Today, we are talking with educators, parents and students from Florida to California, on critical education issues facing the nation.

The conversations on #NPRedchat have informed our journalism in unexpected and exciting ways and today’s LIVE Twitter Education Forum was no different.

Florida State Archives

We received several hundred responses when we called out to our audience for stories about Hurricane Andrew.  As we learned while doing the “Remembering Andrew” project, people who experienced Hurricane Andrew still have vivid memories they are eager to share.

When the Venezuelan Consulate in Miami was shut down in January of this year,  Venezuelan nationals in the region were left stranded, with no chance to participate in the democratic process.

Then came the reality of the logistical nightmare- 19,542 citizens registered in Miami (which are Venezuelans living in the states of Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, and South Carolina) would have to mobilize and vote in New Orleans for the upcoming October elections.

Danny Rivero

Danny Rivero is our social media editor here at WLRN. You don’t hear his voice on the radio, but Danny’s is the voice of WLRN on TwitterFacebook, and Tumblr.

After Broward County’s architectural legacy was all but completely forgotten in a recently released list from the American Institute of Architects, we decided to conduct our own audience survey about the top buildings in Broward County.

Fontainebleau Miami Beach. Mar-a-Lago National Historic Landmark. City Park Municipal Garage.

Does something from the above list feel out of place?

In a recently released list from the American Institute of Architects, the sole building from Broward County that made the rank among the 100 top buildings in Florida was a parking garage.

That just can’t be.

This Monday when WLRN announced that contributor Terence Cantarella will embark on a historic voyage next Monday to circumnavigate Miami’s canal systems via canoe, we got a flood of feedback from our audience. Mostly urban legends.  Oral tradition and fear of the unknown  have long informed some of us that creepy things are hiding in the murky waters.  For a city that prides itself on being on the water, it seems that water is limited to Miami Beach for some.

Jeffrey Martinez

The canal system of Miami-Dade County is the unrecognized backdrop to millions of lives. The canals run across every corner of the county, yet many people have no idea where they lead or what their purpose is.  Most people drive or walk past them without paying them any attention.

All that’s about to change.

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