Claire Thornton

Intern, Summer 2018

Claire Thornton, 21, is a rising senior at Princeton University, where she is Head News Editor for The Daily Princetonian. She is majoring in English, with minors in journalism, American studies, and Slavic studies. Her independent research within Princeton’s English department focuses on Western news coverage of the Russian state. In other words, she should have majored in comparative literature.

This past spring, Claire’s work for The Daily Princetonian involved covering a course that was cancelled after the professor used the n-word, campus workers’ rights, a police stand-off that left one man dead, and special coverage of co-education at Princeton. Claire is known for her bluntness and candor in the newsroom, according to her assistant news editors.

Originally from San Antonio, Texas, Claire is a Texan at heart. But she has also embraced the East Coast since starting college at Princeton. She was also lucky enough to study in London with Princeton’s English department in the fall of 2017.

Working at WLRN is Claire’s first time writing for a news organization other than The Daily Princetonian. Last summer, she worked as an artistic operations intern for the Van Cliburn International Piano Competition in Fort Worth, Texas and Opera Philadelphia. Having never been to Florida before, she is excited to report on Miami with fresh eyes. She’s also looking forward to the Cuban food, of course.

Ways to Connect

Courtesy of Seraphic Fire

For vocal students, the transition from college to professional choirs can feel impossible. Miami's only professional choral ensemble is working to change that this summer.

Claire Thornton / WLRN News

The Ft. Lauderdale City Commission approved on Tuesday a long-term plan to develop the iconic Pier 66 hotel and Sails Marina. Commissioners also voted to increase property taxes and agreed to pay for police in Broward County schools.

The committee's vote to increase property taxes means an additional $5 million stays in the city's water-sewer fund, which has seen its balance go down as money from it has been used to balance the city's budget in recent years.

Courtesy of the South Florida Water Management District

From inside their massive headquarters in West Palm Beach, the South Florida Water Management District (SFWMD) regulates the natural flow of water from Orlando to the Keys. Using canals and water-holding sites, officials are trying to prevent the types of algae blooms that led Governor Scott to declare a state of emergency in seven counties on Monday.

Claire Thornton

Across from Trump Palace tower, hundreds of Russia soccer fans congregated at the RK Village Plaza shopping center in Sunny Isles on Saturday. They were focused on celebrating the Russian team's accomplishments to date, instead of pinning hopes on future prospects in the FIFA tournament.

Claire Thornton / WLRN News

On a Friday morning in West Palm Beach, World Cup fans clad in sky blue took over the Argentine restaurant Al Pan Pan. South Floridians representing a host of different Latin American countries collectively cheered for their neighbor Uruguay in its match against France. 

Members of the crowd screamed, cried, and bit their nails during the quick 95-minute game.

Among the folds of Uruguayan flags stood patron Juan Iglesias, who is Cuban.

"Whoever's in that is a Latin country, you know I root for that," Iglesias said.

Claire Thornton / WLRN News

During rush hour in downtown Ft. Lauderdale, March for Our Lives activists rallied for increased gun control  on the steps of the federal courthouse - the same place where they challenged lawmakers by "calling BS" over four months ago.

Friday's rally was part of a state-wide bus tour that includes all of Florida's 27 congressional districts. The students say their main goal is increasing the youth voter turnout rate.

Claire Thornton

Hundreds of protesters representing 23 advocacy groups rallied on Saturday against the Trump administration’s family separation policies at a Homestead detention center for children who crossed the Southern U.S. border.

Chants of “Hey, Trump, leave the kids alone!” remained steady throughout the protest, even when it began to rain heavily. Many of those leading chants were children themselves.

Courtesy of Kevin Kenner

University of Miami’s Frost School of Music and the U.S. Chopin Foundation are partnering to organize the first ever Frost Chopin Festival and Academy.

The Frost festival will give 20 pianists a chance to to immerse themselves in the work and legacy of composer Frederic Chopin. Most of the participants are from across the U.S. and some international.

Pianists were selected to  participate in masterclasses with Chopin experts and the week-long event will include public performances and lectures on Chopin's music and personal life.

Claire Thornton

Nicaraguans in Miami eager to provide aid to their home country are planning to deliver medical supplies to those in need.

Recent anti-government protests in Nicaragua have caused the country to nearly shut down, and injured protesters do not have access to proper medical care, according to the Inter-American Commission for Human Rights. The United Nations human rights office has asked Nicaragua's government to let it enter the country and gather evidence about the deaths of protesters, many of whom were students. Over 800 people have been injured, according to IACHR.

Hector Gabino, el Nuevo Herald

District 12 Commissioner Jose Diaz’s constituents in Miami-Dade County comprise the largest population of Nicaraguans in the United States. On Tuesday, Diaz helped pass a resolution condemning the Nicaraguan government’s use of force against protesters. He specifically wants to see action from the U.S. Congress.

Claire Thornton

Just two days before the official start of hurricane season, Florida International University hosted the world premiere Wednesday of “BUILT TO LAST?,” a documentary that warns of risks to homes and other buildings in “the age of disaster.”

“When someone loses their home, it’s like they’ve lost everything,” said Aris Papadopoulos, of FIU’s Extreme Events Institute, whose book, “Resilience – The Ultimate Sustainability,” inspired the film.