Christine DiMattei


Years ago, after racking her brains trying to find a fun, engaging, creative nighttime gig to subsidize her acting habit, Chris decided to ride her commercial voiceover experience into the fast-paced world of radio broadcasting. She started out with traffic reporting, moved on to news . . . and never looked back. Since then, Chris has worked in newsrooms throughout South Florida, producing stories for radio broadcasts and the web.

In her other life, she has been married to 12 husbands (including a not-so-wild boar and a garden slug), given birth to 15 children, died four times, twice taken vows as a nun and once been abducted by pirates in the Caribbean. And all this by doing English language dubbing for dozens of foreign films, soap operas and cartoons.  Both lives, she says, have been "a most excellent adventure."

Ways To Connect


As Floridians ring out the old and ring in the new for 2015, there’s one thing they can say “farewell” to: a tax on their insurance bills that goes toward paying hurricane damage claims.

Insurance policies issued or renewed after Jan. 1, 2015, will no longer include the hurricane tax for the Florida Catastrophe Fund. The charge shows up on most insurance bills including homeowner and auto insurance policies.

But watchdog groups are urging policyholders to check their insurance bills, anyway. 

Flickr/CreativeCommons/Bruce Tuten


How’d you like to become a citizen scientist and help conservation efforts in the Everglades?

Every other Saturday from Jan. 3, 2015 until late March, Everglades National Park will host its Big Day Birding Adventure.

Novice and experienced birders alike will be asked to spend the day counting birds within the varied habitats of the park -- from freshwater marsh to mangrove swamp.

C. DiMattei

Perhaps it was the rain. Or because it was Jan. 1st, a day for sleeping off New Year's Eve revelry and laying low.

But in Wilton Manors, one of the most gay-friendly cities in the country, the reaction to a judge's decision essentially clearing the way for gay marriage in Florida was pretty subdued.

Christine DiMattei

In the wake of the Dec. 20 shooting deaths of two of New York's Finest, Miami's police union is calling for an end to violence against law enforcement officers.

A crowd of police officers and their families and friends gathered outside Bayside Marketplace yesterday to remember Rafael Ramos and Wenjian Liu. The two New York City officers were killed by a gunman who investigators say was angered by recent police-involved deaths of unarmed black men in Ferguson, Missouri and Staten Island. Balaraman

A promise that travel to Cuba would be easier for Americans was part of President Obama’s historic announcement this week that he’s taking steps to normalize relations.

What will the easing of sanctions against Cuba mean for the average traveler -- as well as for people who want to do business there?

We asked reporter Mimi Whitefield, who covers the Latin American economy for the Miami Herald.

Here are a few things you need to know.

Below is an edited transcript. vuono

Among those cheering President Obama’s plans to ease up on sanctions against Cuba are fans of the island’s legendary cigars and rum.

The president announced on Wednesday that the United States will be re-establishing diplomatic relations with Cuba.  That includes relaxing certain trade and travel restrictions.

Alicia Zuckerman

A lawmaker from the city that hosts Art Basel Miami Beach says a tax break on art work would help stimulate the economy statewide. 

State representative David Richardson of Miami Beach just filed a bill that would exempt works of art from the state's sales tax. 

To qualify, the artwork would have to be original, as well as signed and sold by the artists. It would have to cost at least $1,000.

Richardson says said the measure is important because artwork in Florida is under a double-taxation: GC

Florida tourism officials say America’s restrictive travel visa rules are costing the Sunshine State big bucks.

The Visa Waiver Program currently allows citizens of 38 countries to travel to the United States for tourism without having to obtain visas.

All Aboard Florida


A group of Palm Beach County business leaders says they’re confused by All Aboard Florida’s unwillingness to appear at their luncheon Thursday, especially since it was All Aboard Florida who pitched the idea in the first place.


The people in charge of Tri-Rail say they want to take the guessing game out of train arrivals and departures.

So they plan to totally revamp the commuter rail's passenger information system.

Tri-Rail officials admit the system they use to inform their passengers about train statuses and delays is woefully out of date.  And younger riders accustomed to social media and up-to-the-minute alerts are driving the need for more real-time information.