Christine DiMattei

Anchor/Reporter

Years ago, after racking her brains trying to find a fun, engaging, creative nighttime gig to subsidize her acting habit, Chris decided to ride her commercial voiceover experience into the fast-paced world of radio broadcasting. She started out with traffic reporting, moved on to news . . . and never looked back. Since then, Chris has worked in newsrooms throughout South Florida, producing stories for radio broadcasts and the web.

In her other life, she has been married to 12 husbands (including a not-so-wild boar and a garden slug), given birth to 15 children, died four times, twice taken vows as a nun and once been abducted by pirates in the Caribbean. And all this by doing English language dubbing for dozens of foreign films, soap operas and cartoons.  Both lives, she says, have been "a most excellent adventure."

Ways to Connect

C. DiMattei

Many of the service workers at South Florida's busiest airport for Thanksgiving holiday travel say they can't afford a traditional Thanksgiving dinner this year.

About 60 members of a local airport workers' union held a rally Monday at Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport to try to persuade airline contractors to pay them higher wages.

The Workers

miamidade.gov

 "This is a work of fiction," cautions the introduction to poet C.M. Clark's latest book, "Charles Deering Forecasts the Weather & Other Poems."

Whatever would Charles Deering say?
 If there's one person who can at least guess, it's Clark.   She was the very first Literary Artist-in-Residence for the Deering Estate, which stands alongside the Biltmore Hotel and Vizcaya as one of Miami-Dade's historical gems.   The estate was built in 1916 by Deering, a wealthy industrialist, and once housed one of the most extensive art collections in our region. 

Florida Power & Light Company

The Florida Power and Light workers who went up north to help restore power after Hurricane Sandy are homeward-bound.

Florida Power & Light Company

More than 1,000 Florida Power & Light workers are still up north, helping homes and businesses restore power after a double whammy:  First, Hurricane Sandy and then a powerful winter storm that blew the lights out again.

FlickR/DVIDSHUB

Among the thousands of Floridians who voted by absentee ballot are work crews sent up north to help get the power back on after Hurricane Sandy.  

Days before Hurricane Sandy hammered the northeast, hundreds of Florida Power & Light workers got in their trucks and drove north.  

The crews were deployed as part of mutual assistance partnership between FPL and utilities along the east coast.  

C. DiMattei

Don’t feel bad, Palm Beach County.

You aren’t the only Florida voting district still counting ballots, trying to nail down once and for all which presidential candidate won the Sunshine State.

As of Wednesday, eight Florida counties were still crunching the numbers: Broward, Escambia, Duval, Hillsborough, Miami-Dade, Okaloosa, Pinellas and Putnam. 

Christine DiMattei

Lois Frankel Wins District 22

From the moment Lois Frankel took the podium at the Embassy Suites Hotel in West Palm Beach Tuesday night, she kept it classy

“A few moments ago, I received a very, very gracious call from Adam Hasner congratulating me," Frankel told her supporters.   "He was a formidable and articulate challenger.”

Christine DiMattei

State election officials say they're keeping an eye on Palm Beach County's operations, after a second printing mishap involving absentee ballots.

The first blunder involved 27,000 absentee ballots with a header missing above the judicial races.  The ballots can't be read by Palm Beach County's vote tabulation machines, so election office workers are copying out those forms by hand onto new ballots.

FlickR/DonkeyHotey

From the county that brought us hanging chads  12 years ago -- a new voting snafu.

This time, the problem in Palm Beach County is 27,000 misprinted absentee ballots that can't be read by voting tabulation machines.

But Florida Republicans and Democrats say the situation doesn't appear as grave as the butterfly ballot fiasco that threw the 2000 Presidential Election into turmoil.

Palm Beach County GOP Chair Sid Dinerstein says when he heard about the mishap, his first reaction was, "Here we go again."

Whenever 19-year-old Robbie Walsh tells friends and family back home in Maryland that he goes to Lynn University, they do a double-take.

"They go, 'Lynn University? What?'" he says. "Then I have to tell them it's in Boca Raton, Florida, and a lot of them say, 'Oh, FAU,' or 'The University of Miami.'"

Many of Lynn's students and faculty who gather at the campus cafe say they hear that sort of thing all the time. But university spokesman Joshua Glanzer says a new T-shirt showing up on campus gives it right back.

Flickr/DonkeyHotey

Forget booths and absentee ballots.

College students would rather vote using their thumbs, according to a study conducted by telecommunications giant AT&T.

AT&T conducted the survey on one of the most politically galvanized campuses in the nation -- Lynn University in Boca Raton.  American politics have played a major role at Lynn since last fall, when the university was chosen to host the last Presidential debate of 2012.

Out of nearly 300 students surveyed, 58 percent say they would use smartphones to cast their ballot if "mobile voting" were available.

Justin Namon

After actor Tom Wahl first read the script for “I Am My Own Wife,” he had to lie down.

“It was a little overwhelming,” Wahl says.  “But from the first page, I was just blown away by the story.”

Doug Wright’s Pulitzer Prize-winning play revolves around the life of Charlotte Von Mahlsdorf, a Berlin transvestite, who survived first the Nazis and then the Communists -- as a woman.

C. DiMattei

If you’re a small, private university with a less-than-stellar reputation, what’s a good way to boost your profile?

For Lynn University it was a no-brainer: Host one of the most important events in American politics.

"We've been waiting for this moment for a long time," says Dr. Kevin Ross, Lynn University's president.

The “moment” arrives on Monday, when President Barack Obama and Republican challenger Mitt Romney arrive on Lynn’s Boca Raton campus for the third and final presidential debate before Election Day.

C. DiMattei

Lynn University students are rolling out the digital red carpet for political watchers in advance of the last Presidential Debate of 2012.

The small Boca Raton university is hosting the final face-off between President Obama and his Republican challenger Mitt Romney on Monday, October 22nd.

Lynn spokesman Joshua Glanzer says the university enlisted a core group of student volunteers to interact with Twitter and Facebook users within the school's new Social Media Lounge.

Christine DiMattei

A wry symbol on a text message.

Last fall, that was the first inkling Lynn University President Kevin Ross had that his school would be making the history books.

“I was out at lunch and got a text that said, ‘You need to come back to campus immediately,’" recalls Ross.  “And it was with a smiley-face after it. So I knew it was good.”

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