Carol Gentry

Carol Gentry, founder and editor of Health News Florida, has four  decades of experience covering health finance and policy, with an emphasis on consumer education and protection.

After serving two years as a Peace Corps volunteer in Colombia, Gentry worked for a number of newspapers including The Wall Street Journal, St. Petersburg Times (now Tampa Bay Times), the Tampa Tribune and Orlando Sentinel.  She was a Kaiser Foundation Media Fellow in 1994-95 and earned an MPA at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government in 1996.  She directed a journalism fellowship program at CDC for four years.Contact Ms. Gentry at at 727-410-3266 or by e-mail.

Influenza season is at its peak nationwide, and Florida is no exception. That's obvious on the map at the Centers for Disease Control website.

Dr. Ben Mac-Ryan Spivey, an Ocala dentist who was suspended and heavily fined in 2012 based on complaints from at least 10 patients, completed his probation only to find himself in trouble again.

When an individual goes up against a multibillion-dollar company, odds of prevailing are slim.

But every now and then, justice smiles on the little guy. It’s smiling on Tampa internist Jose Ignacio Lopez, who won $1.5 million in a slander suit against a global health-finance powerhouse.

Humana, Florida’s largest Medicare managed-care company, says it will lay off hundreds of employees in April, including 328 in Florida.

Of those, 260 are in the Tampa Bay area, according to Humana spokeswoman Nancy Hanewinckel.

Cardiologists in mainstream medicine were so sure that chelation therapy for heart disease was bunk that Dr. Gervasio Lamas raised eyebrows when he decided to explore the question in a clinical trial.

As StatNews describes in a profile of the Miami Beach physician, Lamas got so little support he had to finance the trial in part with a second mortgage on his house.

Florida saw an “impressive” drop in the rate of uninsured adults in 2014 and 2015, the first two years of full implementation of the Affordable Care Act, according to a study released Wednesday.

South Miami Hospital has agreed to pay the federal government $12 million to settle charges that it knowingly allowed and billed for unnecessary medical procedures on thousands of patients.

Over a five-year period, Florida’s Medicaid program overpaid private HMOs an estimated $26 million in monthly premiums for enrollees who had already died, according to a federal audit released Tuesday.

A blood treatment that was popular 75 years ago but faded away when antibiotics came along may be making a comeback with the increasing popularity of “integrative medicine.”

Florida’s most vocal advocacy group on health issues will lay off all five of its employees next month as an indirect result of the Republican sweep in the Nov. 8 election.

Florida CHAIN, the state's most active group urging health care for all, says it will lay off all five staff members at the end of next month because it has lost a key source of funds.

WUSF

The hottest trend in health care these days may be “integrative medicine,” which claims to blend the best ideas from alternative medicine and conventional practice.

But there is vast disagreement on what the best ideas are. And it’s not clear who will decide.

Stephanie Sofronsky was just 23, close to graduation from Florida Atlantic University, when she learned she had lymphoma.

She didn’t want to believe it. So she sought a second opinion from Moffitt Cancer Center in Tampa and a third opinion from Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, state records show. Moffitt double-checked with the National Cancer Institute. 

  It makes Gary Schwitzer cringe when he sees a network news report about a diet that lets you eat pizza, doughnuts and ice cream while melting away fat.

U.S. Food and Drug Administration

A South Florida clinic that promotes controversial stem-cell treatments for a wide range of ailments is among the centers receiving a written warning that it is violating federal public health laws.

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