Bridget O'Brien

Associate Producer of News and Public Affairs

Bridget O'Brien produces WLRN's The Florida Roundup as well as morning newscasts. A long-time public radio geek, she feels that audio journalism can take a story beyond text and allows listeners to truly connect through the power of voice. With a background in drama, she brings a theatrical element to everything she does. 

Bridget is a Miami native and graduated from Florida State University. After spending some time on the West Coast as producer at a local station in Sarasota, she was happy to return home and join WLRN’s team.

REUTERS

Two of Florida’s largest counties, Palm Beach and Broward, have started a process that could take opioid drug makers to court for their roles in the opioid crisis. 

M. SPENCER GREEN / AP

There are nearly two million gun licenses in Florida but figuring out exactly how many guns are in the state is a more challenging figure to extract. Florida, like most states, does not require gun owners to register their weapons. 

Bridget O'Brien / WLRN News

This week on a special edition of The Florida Roundup at the Miami Book Fair, WLRN's Tom Hudson spoke with a panel of authors about the changing political and cultural landscape of South Florida.

National Book Award finalist and MacArthur finalist Edwidge Danticat, host of NPR's Full Disclosure Roben Farzad and Dr. Andrew Frank, professor of history at Florida State University took to the stage to discuss everything from uncertainty over immigration to the slow expansion of medical marijuana and the backlash against Confederate symbols scattered across the state. 

Wilson Sayre

The effort to put emergency money for food into the pockets and bank accounts of South Florida meant waiting in  lines and in court this week.

D-SNAP is the government program for disaster food assistance. The federal government program returned to the region for three days this week after overwhelming demand last month led to long lines and police shutting down some distribution sites over public safety concerns. 

AP Photo/Steve Cannon

The first reports of Sen. Jeff Clemens' extramarital affair with a lobbyist came four days before Halloween. The Lake Worth politician was the top Democrat in the state Senate and set to lead the minority party in 2019. He resigned that same day.

Facebook via Miami Herald

It was a Nixonesque moment — a politician asked about questionable campaign tactics — when Michael Grieco told the Miami Herald to “look right into my soul.”

 

Greico, a first-time commissioner elected in 2013, handed in his resignation at City Hall on Oct. 24. He faced a charge of accepting an illegal campaign contribution, but he avoided admitting guilt and said he didn’t do it.

 

City of Key West

For years tourists have flocked to take photos at Key West's Southernmost Point Marker.

That came to a halt when the concrete buoy was damaged during Hurricane Irma. But the buoy is photo-ready again.

The Florida Keys News Bureau reports that the City of Key West hired Danny Acosta, the original artist, and artist Henry DelValle to repaint the graphics on the Florida Key's most photographed tourism icon.

The colorful marker represents the southernmost point of land in the continental United States.

One month since Maria hit Puerto Rico, the wait for Irma's food benefits in South Florida and Florida public schools vs. the state over charter schools all on this week's 'special pledge edition' of The Florida Roundup with host Tom Hudson. 

Guests: 

Sun-Sentinel

This week  The Florida Roundup looks into the decision to remove a statue of Broward County's namesake and a proposal to ban plastic foam containers from Hollywood Beach. Also,  find out what one nursing home boss thinks of new efforts to require emergency generators. 

Guests: 

WP PAARZ / FLICKR

A backlog of immigration hearings nationwide continues to grow because judges are being reassigned as the Trump administration focuses on asylum hearings in border towns, according to a recent investigation by  Telemundo 51 and NBC 6 South Florida. 

Myriam Masihy, consumer investigative reporter for Telemundo 51 and NBC 6 South Florida, investigated the backlog and joined WLRN’s Tom Hudson Friday to talk about the report on The Florida Roundup. 

MARK HEDDEN / MARKHEDDEN.COM

The Florida Roundup tackles a big backlog in immigration court, the housing squeeze in the Keys after Irma and how the storm may have helped sea life but hurt those making a living from the sea. 

This week's guests on The Florida Roundup with host Tom Hudson: 

Al Diaz / Miami Herald

This week's guests on The Florida Roundup with host Tom Hudson include: 

CAITLIN OSTROFF / MIAMI HERALD

The Florida Roundup concentrated this week on the recovery efforts after Hurricane Irma. Guests included: 

Credit John O'Connor / StateImpact Florida

Education has traditionally been a mainstay topic for labor activists. So it seems appropriate that going into Labor Day this year, some South Florida educators are trying to unionize.

In recent years, colleges and universities, hoping to cut costs, have increasingly relied on part-time professors. In response, a growing number of part-time professors are pushing for unions. They're seeking things like higher wages and health-care benefits.

Courtesy of @darnelmanes

On the first day of August, traces of Tropical Storm Emily brought heavy rains to Miami-Dade County during high tide bringing extreme flooding to certain areas, most notably in Miami Beach.

The city has spent half-a-billion dollars on flood management efforts including raising streets and installing a series of pumps to battle high water. But it wasn't designed to deal with so much water at once and the city's pumps lost power during last week's heavy onslaught. How well are these anti-flooding projects equipped to safeguard from unexpected meteorological events? 

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