Arianna Prothero

Reporter/Anchor/Producer

Arianna grew up listening to NPR. After a post high school stint in ballet, she stumbled into a public radio career through an internship at WFIU in Bloomington, IN. There, Arianna worked as a reporter, anchor and producer while earning a Bachelors degree in political science and a minor in Eastern European studies at Indiana University. 

After graduating from IU, Arianna moved to Miami and started working as a part time producer for WLRN-Miami Herald News. She immediately fell in love with South Florida and counts herself among the lucky to cover a region where the news is never dull. Arianna is now a full time producer, anchor and reporter for WLRN-Miami Herald News.

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Environment
8:21 am
Fri May 31, 2013

WWII Ship Threatens Marine Sanctuary Off Key West

The U.S.S. Joseph M. Cudahy sank in the Gulf of Mexico during World War II.
Credit U.S. Coast Guard

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has identified a sunken ship off the coast of Key West as one of several nationwide that could pose a serious environmental problem.

The Joseph M. Cudahy sunk in the Gulf of Mexico during World War II after it was torpedoed by a German U-Boat.

While the NASA report lists 36 ship wrecks around the United States as potential oil pollution threats, the Cudahy is one of 17 ships that NOAA said needs to be assessed and possibly removed.

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News
9:00 am
Tue May 28, 2013

Why Davie Is Selling The Town's Brand New Bridge

The bridge spans the canal that divides the equestrian trail at Southwest 130th Avenue and 14th Street.
Credit Joe Rimkus Jr./Miami Herald

 

If you’re looking to buy a brand new, never before used bridge, contact the town of Davie.

The Davie Town Council voted last year to build a bridge across the N-23 Canal. It was supposed to be a small, charming bridge for hikers and horseback riders.

But instead, they ended up with a brown, bulky bridge for vehicles-- as well as a lot of upset residents.

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Dance
6:00 am
Fri May 24, 2013

Ballet Provides Cuban Defectors A New Start In Miami

Annie Ruiz Diaz says she left Cuba because she wanted to try out more styles of dance beyond what the National Ballet of Cuba performs.
Credit Gregory Castillo/Miami Herald

The Cuban Classical Ballet of Miami operates out of an old, white mansion in Little Havana. Just like any company, the dancers start their day with ballet class.

But what makes this company different is that it’s a holding station for dancers who defect from Cuba, a place where they can stay in shape and get help finding permanent jobs.

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Sports
7:20 am
Wed May 15, 2013

Is The Swimming Hall Of Fame In Broward Moving To California?

The International Swimming Hall of Fame may leave Fort Lauderdale when its lease with the city expires in 2015.
Credit Victor Martinez/Flickr

If the city of Santa Clara has its way, the International Swimming Hall of Fame in Fort Lauderdale may move to California.

That's right, Santa Clara, the city that just built a new stadium for the San Francisco 49ers and is neck-n-neck with South Florida in a bid for Super Bowl L.

Santa Clara says it plans to raise $2 million for an endowment to support the swimming hall as well as $10 million to move it to the West Coast.

The hall has also received inquiries from England and China.

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Invasive Species Cookbook
2:36 pm
Fri May 10, 2013

Why Florida Has The Most Invasive Species

Originally from Cuba, the Cayman Islands and Bahamas, Cuban treefrogs are one of more than 130 invasive amphibians and reptiles in Florida.
Credit Jeff Wright/Flickr

Florida has a big problem with invasive species, and the idea of chowing down on the pests has been gaining in popularity. So far, there’s a cookbook dedicated to lionfish, an invasive species cooking contest and even an invasive species sampler tent at The Grassroots Festival on Virginia Key this past February. 

As Lanette Sobel with the Fertile Earth Foundation said, “If you can’t beat ‘em, eat ‘em.”

Unfortunately, that tactic, however appetizing, is probably not enough to outpace the invaders wreaking havoc on Florida’s ecosystem.

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Session 2013
7:30 am
Fri May 10, 2013

How Did The Arts Fare In Session 2013?

Compared to other states, Florida's legislators are middle of the road when it comes to funding the arts.
Credit Ines Hegedus-Garcia/flickr

Over the course of the recently concluded legislative session, we approached lawmakers with questions from South Florida residents that came out of last February's WLRN-Miami Herald Town Hall.

Here's one:

What's being done to promote and protect development of local artists across the state?

The short answer is: not much.

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Arts
7:00 am
Fri May 3, 2013

Rolling Out The Red Carpet For Boys In Ballet

Ballet students during a class at Miami City Ballet School.
Credit Arianna Prothero

If you ask someone to name a valuable commodity, they may say gold, or oil. Ask someone in ballet the same question, and there’s good chance they’ll say boys.

Most ballets have almost equal part male and female roles. But in the U.S., boys who want to do ballet are hard to come by.  

For that reason boys often receive full scholarships to ballet schools and other forms of special treatment in order to attract them to the profession.

Former principal dancer with New York City Ballet Philip Neal was one of those boys.

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Dance
6:30 am
Fri May 3, 2013

Why Ballet Is A Man's World, Except In Miami

Miami City Ballet Artistic Director rehearses the ballet Apollo during her first series of performances at the head of the company.
Credit Daniel Azoulay

The legendary choreographer George Balanchine once said, “ballet is woman,” and that seems to be the case, considering the scarcity of boys aspiring to become ballet dancers compared to the legions of girls.  But of the girls who grow up to become top dancers, few have actually graduated into the upper levels of leadership.

Ballet’s Glass Ceiling

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Events
12:00 pm
Fri April 5, 2013

Miami's Philanthropy Festival Is A Fun Way To Learn About Nonprofit Life, Work

Credit Mitchell Zachs/magicalphotos.com

The second annual PhilanthroFest kicks off Saturday at noon in downtown Miami. The event is like speed-dating for volunteers, donors, nonprofits and the people who may need them.

More than 100 organizations are participating in the event that runs from noon until 6:30 p.m. at Miami-Dade College’s Wolfson Campus, at 300 NE Second Ave.

PhilanthroFest co-founder Estrellita Sibila says the festival is helpful for local nonprofits, which sometimes have to compete with organizations from out-of-town.

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Transportation
8:37 pm
Fri March 29, 2013

Obama Says Miami Port Project Is Model For Infrastructure Investment Nationwide

Credit Jose Iglesias/El Nuevo Herald

President Obama traveled to PortMiami Friday to talk about the importance of the nation’s infrastructure to the economy. He outlined a plan for state and local governments to fund large-scale infrastructure projects through private sector partnerships.

PortMiami provided the perfect backdrop for the announcement. The port is undergoing a series of multimillion-dollar improvements including a $915 million project to dig a tunnel under Biscayne Bay that will directly connect the port to I-395.

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Transportation
5:11 pm
Thu March 28, 2013

Why Hasn't Florida Banned Texting And Driving?

39 states ban texting while driving. An additional 5 states make it illegal for novice drivers to text and drive.
Credit Jason Weaver/Flickr

Steve Augello lives in Spring Hill Florida, just outside of Tampa. Like a lot of dads, he always made his 17-year-old daughter, Alessandra, check-in with him when she was out. Augello also had a rule.

“You weren’t allowed to have that cell phone out while you’re driving,” Augello remembers telling Alessandra. “I even tested her a few times I called her when she was driving and it always went right through to the recorder.”

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Transportation
4:00 pm
Thu March 28, 2013

Gov. Scott Wants Florida Reimbursed For Port Improvements

PortMiami is undergoing a massive expansion project, which includes deepening the channel for larger cargo ships, building a tunnel for tractor trucks and connecting the port to the Florida East Coast railway tracks.
Credit Ed Webster/Flickr

President Barack Obama will be visiting PortMiami Friday to talk about the economy.  Gov. Rick Scott, meanwhile, is asking the federal government to repay Florida for the money it has spent on port improvements.

Although Scott often criticizes the federal government for spending too much, he says this is different.

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music
9:00 am
Thu March 21, 2013

Fela! An Afro-Beat Musical In Miami

Fela! the musical is based on the life and songs of Nigerian protest singer Fela Kuti.
Credit courtesy of the Adrienne Arsht Center

The Tony-award winning Broadway musical, Fela! is in Miami this week. The production is based on the complex life-- and music-- of late Nigerian activist, musician and singer Fela Kuti.

Kuti is known worldwide for founding the musical genre afro-beat. But in Nigeria, he’s known for using his music to protest the country’s military government through the 70s and 80s.

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Under the Sun
3:03 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

The Biscayne Bay Harbor Pilots

View of Port Miami from a cargo ship.
Arianna Prothero

If you’ve spent time at South Pointe Park in Miami Beach, you might have noticed the steady stream of cruise and cargo ships going in and out of Port Miami.  These hulking ships are one of the signature images of South Florida.

All of these ships are driven in and out of the port by a highly trained group of sea captains, also known as harbor pilots.   Harbor pilots know the waters around the port well–they have to be able to draw a map from memory as part of their qualifications.

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Transportation
6:00 am
Mon March 11, 2013

How A Fake Train Station Could Improve Public Transportation In Miami

Although the Purple Line was imaginary, organizers hope it will one day lead to more public transportation in Miami.
Credit Arianna Prothero

Over the weekend, public transit advocates in Miami built a temporary train station along an imaginary transit line. They called it the Purple Line, sticking with the theme of Miami’s other two commuter rail lines, the Orange and the Green. Organizers of the project say this mock train station is going to help improve public transit in the city.

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