Arianna Prothero

Reporter/Anchor/Producer

Arianna grew up listening to NPR. After a post high school stint in ballet, she stumbled into a public radio career through an internship at WFIU in Bloomington, IN. There, Arianna worked as a reporter, anchor and producer while earning a Bachelors degree in political science and a minor in Eastern European studies at Indiana University. 

After graduating from IU, Arianna moved to Miami and started working as a part time producer for WLRN-Miami Herald News. She immediately fell in love with South Florida and counts herself among the lucky to cover a region where the news is never dull. Arianna is now a full time producer, anchor and reporter for WLRN-Miami Herald News.

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Arts Season
9:00 am
Sat October 19, 2013

Music By Colors: Miami Symphony Orchestra Turns Paintings Into Sheet Music

Credit courtesy of Miami Symphony Orchestra

The Miami Symphony Orchestra is celebrating its 25th Anniversary this year with its season opener Oct. 20 at the Adrienne Arsht Center’s Knight Concert Hall.

Maestro Eduardo Marturet has been leading the orchestra for the past eight years and points out that the longevity of the Miami Symphony Orchestra (MISO) puts it in select company with the New World Symphony and Miami City Ballet.

“Well to me it means a great deal, because, you know, 25 years in South Florida is not a little thing,” said Marturet.

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Environment
3:44 pm
Fri October 18, 2013

What South Florida's Spring Tide (Or King Tide) Looks Like

10th and Alton in Miami Beach.
Credit Arianna Prothero WLRN

The high tide that floods South Florida streets this time of year are known within the scientific community as a spring tide, although another popular term is king tide, which is not tied to any particular season.

A spring tide lasts several days and happens a few times a year when the moon, sun and Earth align.

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Arts Season
6:00 am
Fri October 18, 2013

Miami City Ballet Opens With Fast, Furious, Toe-Breaker: Ballo della Regina

Mary Carmen Catoya in Ballo della Regina
Steven Caras/Miami City Ballet

Miami City Ballet’s season opens the evening of Oct. 18 at the Adrienne Arsht Center with Ballo della Regina, a technical feat of precision and speed, with lots of fast turns, hops on point and at times a combination of the two. The ballet, set to music from Verdi's Don Carlo, is so difficult that it’s not widely performed because many companies don’t have the dancers to pull it off. 

"Like Champagne"

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Arts Season
6:00 am
Thu October 17, 2013

Speed Boat Racing, Jimmy Buffett, Graffiti Art: A Half Century At The Miami Marine Stadium

Click through the slidshow to see how the Miami Marine Stadium has changed over the last 50 years. Here, boats are being lowered into the basin for a race in the 1960s.
courtesy Friends of Miami Marine Stadium

The Miami Marine Stadium has been through several incarnations over the past five decades, and the latest is the subject of a new exhibit at the Coral Gables Museum.

Concrete Paradise: Miami Marine Stadium, opening Oct. 17, traces the building’s distinctive history, from its early days as a speed boat racing venue to today as a giant, graffiti canvas and parkour playground.

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Arts Season
6:06 pm
Fri October 11, 2013

Diavolo's 'Transit Spaces' Merges Skateboarding, Dance

L.A. based Diavolo is known for is its acrobatic choreography executed on large, moving props.
courtesy of Diavolo

Diavolo Dance Theater is performing this weekend at the South Miami Dade Cultural Arts Center in Cutler Bay. The company is also holding auditions. And to give you a sense of what kind of performance you can expect from Diavolo, here’s a list of skills they’re looking for in prospective dancers:

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Arts Season
6:00 am
Fri October 11, 2013

Symphonies To Sopranos: What To See, Hear In Classical Music

American Violinist Joshua Bell performs in both Miami and West Palm in March.
Credit Courtesy of the Adrienne Arsht Center

Between South Florida’s companies and performing arts centers, the classical music calendar can fill up fast.

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Arts Season
12:45 pm
Thu October 10, 2013

Five Creative Ways To Experience Modern Dance In South Florida

Credit John Kane/Pilobolus

South Florida doesn’t (yet) have a modern dance company on the same scale as its ballet company, Miami City Ballet, but that doesn’t mean you have to leave the region to see some phenomenal contemporary dance.

Several dance heavyweights are coming to South Florida this season, and there’s a nice range in styles so you can get a sampling of not only the best of the best, but also the full spectrum of the art form. Whether you’re a connoisseur or a newbie, this guide will help you pick what shows to see.

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Transportation
6:00 am
Thu October 3, 2013

How Miami-Dade's Dreams Of Light Rail Look A Lot Like Its Past

A streetcar in Coral Gables in April, 1925
William A. Fishbaugh/State Archives of Florida

Once again, Miami-Dade County is studying whether a light-rail train from mainland Miami to the beach would actually work.

Mayor Carlos Gimenez and the county’s metropolitan planning organization think it could be a solution to the traffic problems of South Beach. If traffic gets worse, Gimenez has said it will “kill the tourism industry.”  

A History Of Light Rail

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Transportation
10:50 am
Mon September 30, 2013

Florida's New Texting While Driving Ban Takes Effect Oct. 1

Experts say that texting while driving makes you 23 times more likely to get into an accident.
Credit IntelFreePress/Flickr

It's official. No more texting and driving in the state of Florida.

Gov. Rick Scott was in South Florida on Tuesday to sign SB 52, legislation championed by Sen. Nancy Detert (R-Venice) for the last four years. 

Under the new law, Florida will join a large majority of states in prohibiting texting while driving. As a secondary offense, however, drivers must be stopped for a separate alleged traffic violation before being ticketed for texting while driving. 

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Transportation
6:00 am
Fri September 27, 2013

It's That Time Again: Thousands Of Critical Mass Cyclists Take To The Streets

Critical Mass takes place in South Florida on the last Friday of every month.
Credit Tropical Pedicab/Flickr

If you're driving through the center of Miami tonight, you need to take a close look at the map below.  

The monthly group bike ride called Critical Mass is taking place again. Cyclists will be riding 12.5 miles around Miami starting at Government Center and ending at Grand Central Park.

The Miami event usually draws a couple thousand cyclists and can back up traffic. The route also changes every month.

Cyclists joining in Fort Lauderdale's Critical Mass have a 14-mile route planned that will start at the War Memorial Auditorium.

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Transportation
4:54 pm
Mon September 23, 2013

Credit Cards In Cabs? 'Not So Fast,' Say Miami-Dade Drivers

Protesting taxi cab drivers gather outside Government Center in downtown Miami.
Credit Arianna Prothero/WLRN

About 50 taxicab drivers gathered outside county hall Monday morning to protest several pending changes that would impact their industry—specifically, Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Gimenez's new Ambassador Cabs program.

The program basically creates a higher set of standards for taxis and drivers, or “ambassadors,” who serve Miami International Airport and PortMiami. One of those changes would require cabs to take credit cards.

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Transportation
6:30 am
Fri September 20, 2013

How Hailing A Cab In Miami-Dade May Be About To Change

Miami-Dade taxis servicing two of the county's tourist hubs, MIA and PortMiami, could soon be required to take credit cards.
Credit John Davey/Flickr

Miami-Dade commissioners want to make some big changes to the county’s taxi industry.

A slew of reforms are on the table, and county leaders are going to be taking a hard look at them on Tuesday.

Here’s the rundown on what might change:

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Public Services
7:00 am
Fri September 13, 2013

What Does The Future Hold For Miami-Dade Libraries?

Librarians and their supporters dogged Mayor Gimenez, budget meeting after budget meeting.
Credit Arianna Prothero/WLRN

The libraries in Miami-Dade County have had a roller-coaster ride this summer. In July, the county decided to not raise taxes even at the expense of closing down 22 libraries. Over time, the number of libraries slated for closure grew smaller until it arrived at zero, but the system still faced cuts to staffing and hours of operation.

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Environment
6:00 am
Thu September 5, 2013

Getting Your Head Around Climate Change Through Music

"Year of the Reef" is the last of four movements in Carson Kievman's symphony "Biodiversity."
Credit Peter J. Maerz/WLRN

It’s often said that life influences art. And for composer Carson Kievman, life in low-lying South Florida led to a symphony about climate change.

Kievman was composer-in-residence for the Florida Philharmonic during the 1990s, and he now runs the SoBe Institute of the Arts in Miami Beach. But the idea for his symphony, titled “Biodiversity,” came from a scientist at the University of Miami’s Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science.

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Food Insecurity
3:28 pm
Tue September 3, 2013

How Many People Are Going Hungry In South Florida? Maybe More Than You Think

Volunteers hand help hand out food at an event in South Beach for Hunger Action Month.
Credit Arianna Prothero/WLRN

South Florida is known as a place where the wealthy live and play, but activists say that image can hide some of the problems facing residents in poorer areas-- specifically the issue of hunger.

The organization Feeding South Florida raises awareness and food donations for people who don’t know where their next meal is coming from. The group serves the whole region from Palm Beach to Monroe County and it’s ramping up its efforts this month to get more people engaged in solving the problem.

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