Alicia Zuckerman

Editorial Director

Alicia began making radio as a 7-year-old in rural upstate New York using two cassette recorders and appropriated material from Casey Kasem’s American Top 40. Twenty years later, she began her real-world radio career as a reporter and producer for NPR’s On the Media.

Her reporting has aired on NPR, American Public Media, and Public Radio International, including The World, Studio 360 and This American Life. Alicia is the founding producer of WLRN’s award-winning weekly public affairs program, The Florida Roundup, as well as the co-creator of Under the Sun on WLRN, the award-winning series of feature stories, interviews, audio postcards, and original fiction.

Among the artists she has interviewed for WLRN are Michael Tilson Thomas, Dawn UpshawMark Morris, Tom Wolfe and They Might Be Giants. Before coming to Miami, she covered arts, culture, and breaking news for WNYC in New York City, where she reported on Carnegie Hall, puppet opera, arts education, Hungarian strudel, strong cheese, two presidential elections, and nuclear power.

She was also the lead classical music and dance reporter at New York magazine. She has also written for the Miami Herald, Details magazine, Dance magazine, Symphony magazine, Jazziz magazine, and others. Her online reporting has appeared in the New York Times, the Huffington Post, Tablet and Electronic Music Foundation, which she helped launch.

Alicia holds a B.A. from the University at Albany (New York) where she studied English and music, and a master’s degree from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism.

She was a 2013 USC Annenberg/Getty arts journalism fellow. In 2013, she won the Edward R. Murrow award for large market feature reporting for Her Own Little Paris. She co-hosted and co-produced the WLRN radio documentary, Remembering Andrewwhich won bronze at the 2013 Third Coast International Audio Festival, sometimes referred to as "the Sundance of radio."

Ways to Connect

Marice Cohn Band / The Miami Herald

 Ruth Greenfield was a music teacher and a maverick. In the segregated 1950s and 60s, she ran a Miami arts school that included students and teachers from all racial backgrounds–even if she had to teach in a Masonic lodge or in a funeral home.  She came from a privileged background and was able to study music in Paris, where people of all kinds interacted more freely.

 

Marice Cohn Band / The Miami Herald

Ruth Greenfield was a music teacher and a maverick. In the segregated 1950s and 60s, she ran a Miami arts school that included students and teachers from all racial backgrounds–even if she had to teach in a Masonic lodge or in a funeral home.  

She came from a privileged background and was able to study music in Paris, where people of all kinds interacted more freely.

WLRN

On September 11, 2001, Tanya Villanueva Tepper’s fiancé, Sergio Villanueva, was one of the 343 New York City firefighters who didn’t make it out of the World Trade Center. Tanya is featured in the new documentary,Rebirth, which follows five people affected by those attacks, over the course of the last decade. The film airs Sunday on Showtime on the 10th anniversary of the attacks. Tanya now lives in Miami, where she has found solace and a new life. She spoke with Under the Sun co-host Alicia Zuckerman.

Alicia Zuckerman

When you stop and listen to your surroundings, what do you hear? We take sound for granted because it’s around us all the time. But when you are forced to listen in a different way, you hear a different story.

Confessions Of A Refugee Boy

Apr 7, 2011
Simon & Schuster

Learning to Die in Miami is author Carlos Eire’s follow-up to his 2003 memoir, Waiting for Snow in Havana. In his first book, Eire wrote about his childhood in Cuba before and during the Castro revolution.

Ted Grossman

Fifty years ago, North Miami Senior High School students lived in neighborhoods where most kept their doors unlocked at night. They say they felt safe riding their bicycles throughout town – some streets weren’t even paved. Today, many students at the school say they don’t feel safe in their school or their neighborhoods.

North Miami Senior High’s demographics have also changed. In 1960, the segregated school was all white. Today, most students are of Haitian descent. According to the school, 31 out of 2,700 students are white.

Kenny Malone

 

A few days after the earthquake, the U.S. government decided that Haitians living in the United States would be eligible for Temporary Protected Status, or TPS.  However, there has been much confusion about who can apply, how you apply and what happens after you apply for TPS.

Taste A Miracle

Jan 19, 2009
Mark Opatow

A tiny berry called a “miracle fruit” transforms your taste buds for about two hours.  The fruit is from a tree originally grown in West Africa.  The grower who ships them across the U.S. is based here in South Florida.  His name is Curtis Mozie and he calls himself the Miracle Fruit Man.  Alicia Zuckerman went to the Fort Lauderdale farm for a tasting.

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