Alicia Zuckerman

Editorial Director

Alicia began making radio as a 7-year-old in rural upstate New York using two cassette recorders and appropriated material from Casey Kasem’s American Top 40. Twenty years later, she began her real-world radio career as a reporter and producer for NPR’s On the Media. Her reporting has aired on NPR, American Public Media, and Public Radio International, including The World, Studio 360 and This American Life. Alicia is the founding producer of WLRN’s award-winning weekly public affairs program, The Florida Roundup, as well as the co-creator of Under the Sun on WLRN, the award-winning series of feature stories, interviews, audio postcards, and original fiction. Among the artists she has interviewed for WLRN are Michael Tilson Thomas, Dawn UpshawMark Morris, Tom Wolfe and They Might Be Giants. Before coming to Miami, she covered arts, culture, and breaking news for WNYC in New York City, where she reported on Carnegie Hall, puppet opera, arts education, Hungarian strudel, strong cheese, two presidential elections, and nuclear power. She was also the lead classical music and dance reporter at New York magazine. She has also written for the Miami Herald, Details magazine, Dance magazine, Symphony magazine, Jazziz magazine, and others. Her online reporting has appeared in the New York Times, the Huffington Post, Tablet and Electronic Music Foundation, which she helped launch. Alicia holds a B.A. from the University at Albany (New York) where she studied English and music, and a master’s degree from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. She was a 2013 USC Annenberg/Getty arts journalism fellow. In 2013, she won the Edward R. Murrow award for large market feature reporting for Her Own Little Paris. She co-hosted and co-produced the WLRN radio documentary, Remembering Andrewwhich won bronze at the 2013 Third Coast International Audio Festival, often referred to as "the Sundance of radio."

Pages

Under the Sun
2:41 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

"Imagined Anthology of Flight and Escape"

Author Ana Menendez

Author and former Miami Herald columnist Ana Menendez, who has been living in Amsterdam, is returning to South Florida for the Miami Book Fair International, the eight-day literary party beginning Nov. 13. Ana has a new book titled Adios, Happy Homeland and will be speaking about it during The Writer’s Voice panel at the fair Sunday, Nov. 20.

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Arts
6:30 am
Fri February 22, 2013

Poet Richard Blanco Reads Tonight In Miami

Richard Blanco says this handshake gave him a lot of confidence on inauguration day.
Credit richard-blanco.com

When Richard Blanco got the call that he'd been chosen to write a poem for President Obama's second inauguration, at first he thought it was a prank. He still has no idea how he ended up on the President's radar.

"I would dream actually that the President has actually read my work and was so moved by it," says Blanco, laughing, "that he said, 'I want this guy to read a poem at the inaugural.'"

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Arts
6:00 am
Mon February 4, 2013

Miami Guitarist Aaron Lebos: Don't Use The F Word

Aaron Lebos (left) with Jim Gasior, keyboards; Eric England, bass; and Rodolfo Zuniga, drums.
Credit Brian Fernandez

When Miami native Aaron Lebos was a kid, his parents told him to choose between violin and piano. "I chose piano," he says, "obviously." But his big brother played electric guitar, and he wanted to too. He thought it was "cooler." Eventually, he got his hands on a guitar of his own and made his way through jazz studies programs at Miami Dade College, University of Miami and FIU. 

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Public Transportation
8:00 am
Fri January 25, 2013

Get On The Bus: How Miami Is Like L.A.

Get on the bus, Gus.
Credit interbeat / www.flickr.com

Several times a week, Miami reminds me of Los Angeles. For better and worse. We're both the land of sunshine, palm trees (theirs are taller) and beautiful beaches (ours are nicer based on ocean temperature and clarity, but we're missing out on the mountains). And both places have much beneath the surface of our beautiful things. Extreme wealth and poverty pressed up against each other, but rarely mixing -- largely because both places are so deeply devoted to the automobile.

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Art Basel
6:30 am
Fri December 7, 2012

How Fine Art Meets Internet Culture In Wynwood During Art Basel

Mallikarjuna and Ritter wanted a GIF of President Obama dancing to Beyoncé's Single Ladies but couldn't find one. So they made it themselves. It went viral.
Credit Krutika Mallikarjuna and Chris Ritter / Buzzfeed.com

Remember those unsettling dancing babies? The ones that got passed around the Internet in the days before social media and eventually made their way onto the Fox TV show, Ally McBeal? Those were GIFs.  

GIF stands for graphics interchange format. It's a series of still images, looped --  and last month, after 25 years of existence, it was named the Oxford English Dictionary 2012 American word of the year.

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Arts
6:00 am
Fri December 7, 2012

Composer/Architect Discusses Airport Installation At Art Basel

Travelers arrive at MIA to the sounds and sights of Christopher Janney's Harmonic Convergence.
Credit Alicia Zuckerman / WLRN

Christopher Janney's sound and light installation for Miami International Airport was unveiled during last year's Art Basel Miami Beach. This year, he's back to discuss the piece on a panel during Design Miami, today (Friday, Dec. 7) at noon. 

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The Brat Pack Takes Miami
10:30 am
Fri November 16, 2012

Pretty In Pink Redux In Miami

Will Molly Ringwald and Andrew McCarthy (right) meet again in Miami? Recognize that guy in the middle (oh, Duckie)? It's Jon Cryer from Two and a Half Men.
Credit imdb.com

At long last, brat pack heartthrobs Molly Ringwald and Andrew McCarthy will cross paths again.  They're both appearing at the Miami Book Fair International on the same day, in the same room ... but not, sadly, at the same time. They'll be separated by five hours. Ohhhhhhh.

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Arts
6:30 am
Fri November 9, 2012

Vonnegut Takes Miami

Dan Wakefield discusses a new book of Kurt Vonnegut's letters at the Miami Book Fair International
Credit Jacket design: Lynn Buckley / Random House, Inc.

Kurt Vonnegut fans have a lot to look forward to over the next couple of weekends. First, a performance of a chamber music piece with a libretto by the iconoclastic author, and then a discussion of a new book of his letters at the Miami Book Fair International.

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Arts
8:38 am
Fri October 12, 2012

How Miami's Classical Music Scene Has Changed In 40 Years

Luciano Magnanini has big plans for retirement: "I will continue playing with the opera, the Palm Beach Symphony, and just see a little bit of the world."
Alicia Zuckerman

The bassoonist Luciano Magnanini has been a fixture of South Florida's classical music scene for the past four decades. He has played around the world and performed under the conductors Leonard Bertstein and Zubin Mehta. In 1972, after arriving from Italy via Peru and Mexico, Magnanini began a 40-year teaching career at the University of Miami. He’s retiring in May, and this Sunday he performs a chamber concert celebrating his career.

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12:47 pm
Wed October 10, 2012

At Least One Hurt In Doral Parking Garage Collapse

Developing. The five-story garage was under construction. AP is reporting people trapped in the rubble.
Part of a five-story parking garage under construction at the new west campus of Miami Dade College has collapsed, sending at least one worker to the hospital.
Under the Sun
5:52 pm
Mon October 1, 2012

Green Card Stories

WLRN

Green Card Stories (Umbrage Books) is a collection of profiles and photographs of fifty immigrants from around the country by journalist Saundra Amrhein and photographer Ariana Lindquist.  Amrhein has been a journalist for seventeen years.  She spent ten years at the St. Petersburg Times (now the Tampa Bay Times.)  Immigrants profiled include a triathelete, a magician, a flea market worker, small business owners and executives.

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Under the Sun
4:00 pm
Wed May 9, 2012

Taking The Plunge

The pool at the National Hotel in Miami Beach
Alicia Zuckerman

UPDATE  June 6, 2013 14:43 p.m.: (AP) Esther Williams, the swimming champion turned actress who starred in glittering and aquatic Technicolor musicals of the 1940s and 1950s, has died. She was 91.

Williams died early Thursday in her sleep, according to her longtime publicist Harlan Boll.

Following in the footsteps of Sonja Henie, who went from skating champion to movie star, Williams became one of Hollywood's biggest moneymakers, appearing in spectacular swimsuit numbers that capitalized on her wholesome beauty and perfect figure.

 

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Civil Rights And Arts
1:03 pm
Wed April 11, 2012

"Her Own Little Paris In Miami"

Ruth Greenfield, now in her late 80s, sits in front of a painting of herself by her husband. Greenfield, a musical prodigy herself, started Miami’s first interracial arts school in the 50s, angering some whites when she taught black students. She lives in
Marice Cohn Band The Miami Herald

Ruth Greenfield was a music teacher and a maverick. In the segregated 1950s and 60s, she ran a Miami arts school that included students and teachers from all racial backgrounds–even if she had to teach in a Masonic lodge or in a funeral home.  She came from a privileged background and was able to study music in Paris, where people of all kinds interacted more freely.

 

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Civil Rights And Arts
1:03 pm
Wed April 11, 2012

"Her Own Little Paris In Miami"

Ruth Greenfield, now in her late 80s, sits in front of a painting of herself by her husband. Greenfield, a musical prodigy herself, started Miami’s first interracial arts school in the 50s, angering some whites when she taught black students. She lives in
Marice Cohn Band The Miami Herald

 Ruth Greenfield was a music teacher and a maverick. In the segregated 1950s and 60s, she ran a Miami arts school that included students and teachers from all racial backgrounds–even if she had to teach in a Masonic lodge or in a funeral home.  She came from a privileged background and was able to study music in Paris, where people of all kinds interacted more freely.

 

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Arts And Civil Rights
1:03 pm
Wed April 11, 2012

"Her Own Little Paris In Miami"

Ruth Greenfield, now in her late 80s, sits in front of a painting of herself by her husband. Greenfield, a musical prodigy herself, started Miami’s first interracial arts school in the 50s, angering some whites when she taught black students.
Marice Cohn Band The Miami Herald

Ruth Greenfield was a music teacher and a maverick. In the segregated 1950s and 60s, she ran a Miami arts school that included students and teachers from all racial backgrounds–even if she had to teach in a Masonic lodge or in a funeral home.  

She came from a privileged background and was able to study music in Paris, where people of all kinds interacted more freely.

Read more

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