Alicia Zuckerman

Editorial Director

Alicia began making radio as a 7-year-old in rural upstate New York using two cassette recorders and appropriated material from Casey Kasem’s American Top 40. Twenty years later, she began her real-world radio career as a reporter and producer for NPR’s On the Media.

Her reporting has aired on NPR, American Public Media, and Public Radio International, including The World, Studio 360 and This American Life. Alicia is the founding producer of WLRN’s award-winning weekly public affairs program, The Florida Roundup, as well as the co-creator of Under the Sun on WLRN, the award-winning series of feature stories, interviews, audio postcards, and original fiction.

Among the artists she has interviewed for WLRN are Michael Tilson Thomas, Dawn UpshawMark Morris, Tom Wolfe and They Might Be Giants. Before coming to Miami, she covered arts, culture, and breaking news for WNYC in New York City, where she reported on Carnegie Hall, puppet opera, arts education, Hungarian strudel, strong cheese, two presidential elections, and nuclear power.

She was also the lead classical music and dance reporter at New York magazine. She has also written for the Miami Herald, Details magazine, Dance magazine, Symphony magazine, Jazziz magazine, and others. Her online reporting has appeared in the New York Times, the Huffington Post, Tablet and Electronic Music Foundation, which she helped launch.

Alicia holds a B.A. from the University at Albany (New York) where she studied English and music, and a master’s degree from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism.

She was a 2013 USC Annenberg/Getty arts journalism fellow. In 2013, she won the Edward R. Murrow award for large market feature reporting for Her Own Little Paris. She co-hosted and co-produced the WLRN radio documentary, Remembering Andrewwhich won bronze at the 2013 Third Coast International Audio Festival, sometimes referred to as "the Sundance of radio."

Ways to Connect

Jimmy Katz / Nonesuch

Fifty years ago Sunday the Beatles played the Ed Sullivan show. That means it's been 50 years since kids all over the country put down their band instruments and picked up the electric guitar. Pat Metheny was one of them, and because of that, in a way, the Beatles are responsible for an important chapter of jazz history. So is Metheny's older brother, who introduced him to Miles Davis, which led him down the road of his own continually evolving brand of improvisation. 

Sailing The Sloop With Seeger: A Local Remembers

Jan 28, 2014
Christina Leps

Allan Aunapu was 26 in 1967, when he went north from Miami to work on the Sloop Clearwater, which would be bound for the Hudson River. The sloop came from the imagination of legendary folk singer and anti-war activist Pete Seeger, who died Monday, Jan. 27, at 94 years old.

Alicia Zuckerman / WLRN

After almost two decades a famed South Florida live music venue is no more.

Located on the corner of Jefferson Avenue and Lincoln Road on Miami Beach, in the historic Van Dyke building built in 1924, Van Dyke Cafe had its last call on Sunday, Jan. 26. Patrons were invited for a special celebration and toast at 5 p.m. to commemorate the closing. The venue was well known for hosting live jazz and became a staple of the beach's people-watching haven, Lincoln Road Mall.

Richard Etienne

Dylan Etienne was in Publix with his mom when a random woman came up and asked if he likes to write. "Yeahhhh," he said, in a tone that indicated he really, really does. You gotta listen to the audio to hear him in his own words.

The woman in the store handed him a flyer for the Miami-Dade Public Library's young adult writers-in-residence program. 

An Interview With PAMM Director Thom Collins

Dec 5, 2013
Arianna Prothero/WLRN

The museum's director doesn't expect you to love everything in the museum. He doesn't even really want to you to.

Here's an edited version of the interview with Thom Collins, but we do recommend listening -- he has a really good voice.

AZ: What does it mean to create a museum for this community?

Marice Cohn Band for The Miami Herald

Ruth Greenfield was a music teacher and a maverick. In the segregated 1950s and 60s, she ran a Miami arts school that included students and teachers from all racial backgrounds–even if she had to teach in a Masonic lodge or in a funeral home.  She came from a privileged background and was able to study music in Paris, where people of all kinds interacted more freely.

Tom Theisen

"She freaking made it." That's what the note posted at 3:14 p.m. to the Google map on her website, where Diana Nyad's journey had been tracked in yellow dots and time stamps, said. Thirty-five years after her first attempt, Nyad did it -- she reached the shores of Smathers Beach in Key West Monday, after pushing off from Havana on Saturday. This was her fifth try, and her fourth in three years.

The 64-year-old swam 111 miles and now holds the world record for swimming the farthest without a shark cage. 

Bob Adelman

Editor's Note: Below are Americans with South Florida connections who went to hear the Rev. Dr.  Martin Luther King Jr. deliver his famous "I Have A Dream" speech in Washington, D.C., one of the most significant civil rights events in history.  Their bios are compiled from public and private sources. Listen to what they have to say. 

SHIRLEY JOHNSON

richard-blanco.com

Cuban cuisine has chewed its way into South Florida's culture. Many an abuela has shared family recipes for ropa vieja and bistec empanizado, through generations. WLRN wants a seat at your table to hear stories, memories or recipes from your kitchen.

  

yogabenessere/flickr.com

  Joyce Green started doing yoga to lose weight. Then she said she had a vision of Jesus, and from there she became Ma Jaya Sati Bhagavati, the wildly charismatic leader of the Kashi Ashram church on a ranch in Indian River County, north of Vero Beach. And that's who she was for the rest of her life, right up until she died last year. 

Dave Conner / www.flickr.com

Fifteen thousand people are leaving Puerto Rico every year, and half of them are coming to Florida. Many are leaving because of an explosion of violence on the island. Over the last several years, the murder rate has been between five and seven times the national average. 

Miami New Times reporter Michael E. Miller traveled to Puerto Rico to find out how things got so bad. The answer? Drugs and police, says Miller. Here's what he found out

Guerra de la Paz

If you’ve ever donated an old coat or a dress, or even pair of socks, to a thrift store, there’s a chance it ended up in the Saatchi Collection in London. That’s because the Miami-based duo, Guerra de la Paz, makes thrift store throwaways into art.

Alicia Zuckerman went with them to their “art supply store,” as they call it, so they could show her how come up with their creations.

Alicia Zuckerman

It’s a time-honored tradition. Spring breakers descend on Miami from across the nation this time of year to guzzle beer, work on their tanlines and hit the clubs.


Or there’s Alternative Spring Break, where you sit in a windowless room, guzzle coffee, and fill out reams of immigration paperwork. You can compile proof of residence, and file for fee waivers. Sound appealing?

Sammy Mack

Give Good Works, a Wynwood thrift store and charity, gives your old and gently used items a second chance.  However, the point is to give people a second chance.  Jennifer Rousseau, who works at the store, transformed her life with the help of the shop’s founder Heather Klinker.

“A lot of people would have given up on us girls,” said Rousseau. “Heather didn’t. She kept going. She’s a hero to me. I love her.”

Philadelphia Museum of Art, Purchased with funds contributed by Dorothy Norman, 1969, Photograph © Robert Frank, from The Americans

This photo of a forlorn, slightly bored young hotel elevator operator was taken on the beach in 1955, at the Sherry Frontenac Hotel (65th and Collins).  It has become one of Frank’s most famous photographs and the face of the exhibition, “Looking In:  Robert Frank’s the Americans” at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. It runs through Jan. 3.

Pages