Alicia Zuckerman

Editorial Director

Alicia began making radio as a 7-year-old in rural upstate New York using two cassette recorders and appropriated material from Casey Kasem’s American Top 40. Twenty years later, she began her real-world radio career as a reporter and producer for NPR’s On the Media.

Her reporting has aired on NPR, American Public Media, and Public Radio International, including The World, Studio 360 and This American Life. Alicia is the founding producer of WLRN’s award-winning weekly public affairs program, The Florida Roundup, as well as the co-creator of Under the Sun on WLRN, the award-winning series of feature stories, interviews, audio postcards, and original fiction.

Among the artists she has interviewed for WLRN are Michael Tilson Thomas, Dawn UpshawMark Morris, Tom Wolfe and They Might Be Giants. Before coming to Miami, she covered arts, culture, and breaking news for WNYC in New York City, where she reported on Carnegie Hall, puppet opera, arts education, Hungarian strudel, strong cheese, two presidential elections, and nuclear power.

She was also the lead classical music and dance reporter at New York magazine. She has also written for the Miami Herald, Details magazine, Dance magazine, Symphony magazine, Jazziz magazine, and others. Her online reporting has appeared in the New York Times, the Huffington Post, Tablet and Electronic Music Foundation, which she helped launch.

Alicia holds a B.A. from the University at Albany (New York) where she studied English and music, and a master’s degree from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism.

She was a 2013 USC Annenberg/Getty arts journalism fellow. In 2013, she won the Edward R. Murrow award for large market feature reporting for Her Own Little Paris. She co-hosted and co-produced the WLRN radio documentary, Remembering Andrewwhich won bronze at the 2013 Third Coast International Audio Festival, sometimes referred to as "the Sundance of radio."

Ways to Connect

Copyright by Judy Blume and used only with her written permission. Not to be further reproduced or distributed except with her permission.

When I was in elementary school, I wrote an "autobiography" called "I Want to Be Like Judy." It had a pink construction paper cover and came in second in the school library contest. I never imagined that  30-something years later, Judy would say to me, "Let's take a selfie!" (See our virtual tour - link below.) I loved all her books, but "Starring Sally J. Freedman as Herself" was one of my very favorites. I read it over and over. Ten times? Fifteen?  

"Culture Concrete": A Dance Film Set In Miami Marine Stadium

Nov 12, 2014

In 2013, Hattie Mae Williams, a contemporary dance choreographer, won a grant from the Knight Foundation’s Arts Challenge.

Now, the New World School of the Arts graduate is having her film debut with “Culture Concrete,” premiering at The LAB Miami in Wynwood this Saturday, Nov. 15.

It’s set within the abandoned Miami Marine Stadium in Virginia Key. Since the stadium's abandonment in 1992, it has become a hub for graffiti artists, both local and international.

David Bazemore

This year, the Miami Book Fair International isn't opening with an author (though Ira Glass did edit a book once). It's opening Sunday (Nov. 16) with a cross-pollination of storytelling and contemporary dance.

Seed Food & Wine Festival

Alison Burgos and Michelle Gaber first started thinking about putting together a plant-based food festival a couple years ago. They were at the South Beach Wine and Food Festival's Burger Bash, and there wasn't anything Alison could eat.

Jeanette Jennings

The author of a new children's book about being transgender is speaking Thursday, Oct.9, at 7 p.m. at the Stonewall Gallery in Wilton Manors. Jessica Herthel wrote "I am Jazz" with Jazz Jennings (not her real last name; her family uses the pseudonym to protect her safety). 

Alicia Zuckerman/WLRN

Got a bent for babka? A talent for tzimmes? A gift for gefilte fish? A capacity for kugel? 

With the Jewish New Year starting next week, the Jewish Museum of Florida-FIU in South Beach is collecting original recipes from cooks and bakers throughout South Florida. And not just collecting them -- judging them, in its "From My Family's Kitchen" recipe contest this Sunday, Sept. 21. 

Shay Cohen

At 86, Dr. Ruth Westheimer proudly announces that she goes out every night. Maybe that explains why so many people seem to have a story about meeting the gregarious sex therapist. This one met her on a cruise. That one met her dancing the hora in a New York City synagogue. I met her waiting in line at the bathroom of Lincoln Center on the Upper West Side. She lives in Manhattan but travels the country and the world (this summer she's headed to Israel and South Africa) having no-nonsense conversations about sex. 

(Note: Mark Hedden's wife is on the board of the Key West Literary Seminar.)

David Kaufelt died Saturday at home in Key West.

He and his wife Lynn arrived from New York four decades ago. David was a writer and wanted to be surrounded by more writers. Several others already made the island their home, but Kaufelt had an idea to make Key West into a true literary destination, not just for people interested in the legacies of Ernest Hemingway and Tennessee Williams, but for living, breathing writers too. 

Miami native Aaron Lebos says his new album, "Turning Point," is meant to be played loud. 

It's a mix of rock, jazz and influences from around the world, fusing a jam-band sound with some of the sonic complexities of jazz. Lebos is a trained -- very trained -- musician, having attended an alphabet soup of South Florida's academic institutions. 

Rui Dias-Aidos

From April 26 to 28, the New World Symphony in Miami Beach is looking hard at the way technology is changing music, and how the group itself is part of that equation. NWS is hosting the annual Network Performing Arts Production Workshop, which connects people from the arts, technology and education.