Abe Aboraya

Health News Florida reporter Abe Aboraya works for WMFE in Orlando. He started writing for newspapers in high school. After graduating from the University of Central Florida in 2007, he spent a year traveling and working as a freelance reporter for the Seattle Times and the Seattle Weekly, and working for local news websites in the San Francisco Bay area. Most recently Abe worked as a reporter for the Orlando Business Journal. He comes from a family of health care workers.

Contact Abe at 407-273-2300 x 183 on Twitter @AbeAboraya or by email

Jamie Kruger transitioned years ago to life as a man, both at home and at work. He got surgery four months ago, a mastectomy and reconstruction to give him a more masculine chest.

The Florida Department of Health has chosen five new marijuana growers in the last few weeks.

Florida has seen a 60 percent surge in the number of patients being treated with medical marijuana since June.

The federal government released more details Wednesday about how much health insurance rates could increase next year in Florida — and the spike could be dramatic for some.

Florida’s senators split their vote Tuesday to open debate on the Republican replacement of the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare.

A nonprofit that serves Central Florida residents with HIV and AIDS says the rates are going up.

Senator Marco Rubio says it’s not fair to financially punish states like Florida that did not expand Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act.

The Orlando Police Pension Board voted to give officer Gerry Realin a disability pension.

Realin was diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder after cleaning up the bodies in Pulse nightclub last year. WMFE Health Reporter Abe Aboraya spoke with All Things Considered Host Crystal Chavez.

There’s a downside to the rainy season in Florida: Mosquitoes.

Orange County Mosquito Control has seen a tenfold increase to about 100 calls for service every day.

An Orlando police officer with post-traumatic stress disorder from the Pulse nightclub shooting gets his last paycheck today.

A new study finds injured workers in Florida are using fewer opioids. 

The Workers Compensation Research Institute studied 26 states from 2010 to 2015. They found significant drops in how often injured workers got opioids, and drops in the in the strength of those drugs. For the first time, more than half of injured workers got non-opioid pain medications, like steroids.


A new study finds injured workers in Florida are using fewer opioids. 

Felicia Duncan’s 7-year-old daughter Emma has been living with epilepsy for years. She been seizure-free since January thanks to medical marijuana. But it costs her Mom $391 a month.

“It is very, very expensive right now,” Duncan said. “And everything has to come out of my pocket, doctor visits and medications and everything.”

When voters approved Amendment 2 in November, it said the state would allow full-strength medical marijuana for 10 conditions, such as cancer, PTSD and Parkinson’s disease. It also allows it for similar conditions.

The health department is investigating another Legionnaires’ disease outbreak in Central Florida – including a fatal case.

The Florida Department of Health is investigating two gyms in the Orlando area for a possible outbreak of Legionnaires’ disease.

Four people have caught the bacterial lung infection in Orange County. When epidemiologists started investigating the four cases, they found two locations in common among the sick: An LA Fitness in MetroWest and an L.A. Fitness in South Orlando.