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3:25 am
Wed June 25, 2014

Trouble In Paradise: Opiate Use Spikes On Martha's Vineyard

A cache of Percocet and other opiates seized by Oak Bluffs police in an arrest earlier this year.
Courtesy of Oak Bluffs Police

Originally published on Wed June 25, 2014 12:48 pm

Underneath the charm of Martha's Vineyard's picturesque beaches, peaceful woods and luxury homes is a problem: Since August, there have been six overdose deaths on the island.

"That's a phenomenal rate for a community of 16,000 people — and that's not to mention the overdoses that haven't been fatal," says Charles Silberstein, an addiction specialist and psychiatrist at Martha's Vineyard Hospital. "We've had overdoses for years, but I don't think we've ever seen this kind of number or frequency."

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The Two-Way
7:10 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

Methodists Reinstate Minister Who Officiated At Son's Gay Marriage

United Methodist minister Frank Schaefer (right) hugs the Rev. David Wesley Brown after a news conference Tuesday at First United Methodist Church of Germantown, Pa. Schaefer was reinstated by the church after being defrocked for presiding over his son's same-sex wedding ceremony.
Matt Rourke AP

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 8:24 pm

A Methodist minister in Pennsylvania, who was defrocked last year for presiding over his son's same-sex wedding, has been reinstated by the church.

A nine-person appeals panel of the United Methodist Church ordered Frank Schaefer's pastoral credentials restored, saying "the jury that convicted him last year erred when fashioning his punishment," according to The Associated Press.

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The Two-Way
7:01 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

'Star Wars' Museum Lands In Chicago

Originally published on Wed June 25, 2014 8:08 am

Star Wars creator George Lucas has chosen Chicago as the location of a planned museum of his art and movie memorabilia.

A spokesman for Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel says the Lucas Cultural Arts Museum will be built in the Windy City.

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The Salt
6:22 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

'Natural' Food Sounds Good But Doesn't Mean Much

Advocates say consumers may assume that the "natural" label is the same as "organic."
iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed June 25, 2014 9:50 am

Some people have had it with "natural" food.

For fifteen years, Urvashi Rangan, director of consumer safety and sustainability for Consumer Reports, has been pointing out that "natural" is just about the most misleading label that you'll ever see on a food package. Yet consumers still look for that word, food companies still love to use it and the Food and Drug Administration can't or won't define it.

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All Tech Considered
5:38 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

A New Jersey Law That's Kept Smart Guns Off Shelves Nationwide

The Armatix smart gun is implanted with an electronic chip that allows it to be fired only if the shooter is wearing a watch that communicates with it through a radio signal. It is not sold in the U.S.
Michael Dalder Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu June 26, 2014 11:51 am

A gun that fires only in the hands of its owner isn't science fiction anymore. A so-called smart gun is already on sale in Europe. But you won't find it on store shelves in this country — in part because of an obscure New Jersey law that's had unintended consequences for the rest of the nation.

Basically, the Childproof Handgun Law of 2002 says that once "personalized handguns are available" anywhere in the country, all handguns sold in New Jersey must be smart guns within 30 months.

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The Two-Way
5:37 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

Living Up To His Past, Suarez Apparently Bites Italian Opponent

Uruguay's Luis Suarez sits on the pitch after apparently biting Italy's Giorgio Chiellini during a World Cup soccer match in Brazil on Tuesday.
Hassan Ammar AP

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 7:55 pm

In some ways, we should have seen it coming. By the time Uruguay's Luis Suarez apparently took a bite out of Italian defender Giorgio Chiellini in Tuesday's match, the ref had already handed out a red card and three yellows.

Chiellini dropped to the ground, writhing, pulling his shirt off his shoulder. And Suarez dropped too, grabbing at his teeth, like they'd been attacked by Chiellini's shoulder. The ref paid no mind, and eventually both men continued their trot across the World Cup stage like nothing happened.

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Deceptive Cadence
5:28 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

New York Philharmonic's Lead Fiddler Rests His Bow

Glenn Dicterow joined the New York Philharmonic as its concertmaster in 1980. He has performed as its soloist every year since.
Chris Lee Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Wed June 25, 2014 11:58 am

Most people who attend symphony performances can spot the concertmaster. That's the first chair violinist who enters before the conductor and helps tune the orchestra. But the all important position calls for much more than that — from playing tricky solos to shaping the sound of the string section.

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Politics
5:25 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

Meet The New Stars Of Campaign Ads: Mom And Dad

Sen. Mary Landrieu, D-La., talks with her father, former New Orleans Mayor Moon Landrieu, on Feb. 1. The two appear together in recent television ads for her re-election campaign.
Gerald Herbert AP

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 7:14 pm

It's the summer of a campaign year and once again the airwaves, the Internet, and likely your own Facebook and other social media feeds are full of political ads.

In the primaries, we've already seen ads featuring cartoon turtles, gator wrestling, lots of dogs, horses and, of course, guns — propped against pickup trucks or resting over shoulders.

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Politics
5:25 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

Addressing Border Crisis, Politicians Find Invitation In Misperception

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 7:14 pm

The House Committee on Homeland Security held a hearing Tuesday to address the influx of unaccompanied immigrant children from Central America. Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson spoke at the proceedings, saying the situation at the border was "urgent."

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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Energy
4:58 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

In Wyoming, Going Deep To Draw Energy From Coal

Linc Energy has installed 44 monitoring wells at its proposed test site near Wright, Wyo., to establish baseline water quality.
Stephanie Joyce for NPR

Originally published on Wed June 25, 2014 9:42 am

The United States is the Saudi Arabia of coal. The only catch is that most coal is buried too deep for conventional mining.

In the tradition of fracking pioneers in the oil and gas industries, an Australian company working in Wyoming wants to use an unconventional technique to access that deep coal: burning it underground.

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The Two-Way
4:58 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

Report Points To 'Dangerous Militarization' Of U.S. Law Enforcement

During a drill, SWAT team members prepare to secure a ship in Bainbridge Island, Wash.
Elaine Thompson AP

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 8:09 pm

U.S. law enforcement at all levels has undergone a dangerous militarization in recent years, with heavily armed SWAT teams being deployed to serve warrants and for drug searches, but rarely for the hostage situations they were designed for, the American Civil Liberties Union says in a new report.

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Technology
4:38 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

A Wild West In Flight: Drones Outpace The Rules Reining Them In

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 9:49 am

Drone technology has moved at a quicker pace than the rules regulating their use, creating an environment that journalist Craig Whitlock likens to the Wild West. He talks with Audie Cornish about what he learned in the course of reporting his series "Hazard Above," which addresses the safety record of drones for The Washington Post.

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Code Switch
4:38 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

The Map Of Native American Tribes You've Never Seen Before

Aaron Carapella, a self-taught mapmaker in Warner, Okla., has designed a map of Native American tribes showing their locations before first contact with Europeans.
Hansi Lo Wang NPR

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 7:14 pm

Finding an address on a map can be taken for granted in the age of GPS and smartphones. But centuries of forced relocation, disease and genocide have made it difficult to find where many Native American tribes once lived.

Aaron Carapella, a self-taught mapmaker in Warner, Okla., has pinpointed the locations and original names of hundreds of American Indian nations before their first contact with Europeans.

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Shots - Health News
4:35 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

3-D Mammography Finds More Tumors, But Questions Remain

A standard digital mammogram, left, compared to a 3-D tomosynthesis mammogram, right.
Courtesy of Hologic

A form of mammogram that takes multiple images does a slightly better job of finding tumors and reducing women's risk of having to be scanned again, a study finds.

It's the biggest study yet to look at tomosynthesis, also called 3-D mammograms. But it's still unclear if using this kind of mammogram increases a woman's odds of surviving breast cancer, the researchers say.

Rather, it found that the 3-D mammograms reduced the rate of recalls, where women had to have more scanning or a biopsy, by 1.6 percent.

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Code Switch
4:30 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

'Freedom Summer' And 'The Watsons': Powerful TV About A Civil Rights Journey

Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party delegates and supporters stage a demonstration on the boardwalk in front of the Atlantic City Convention Center in 1964.
Courtesy of George Ballis/Take Stock

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 4:15 pm

As part of NPR's "Book Your Trip" series, TV critic Eric Deggans looks at a different kind of summertime journey, described in two books that became TV shows: PBS's documentary Freedom Summer, debuting tonight, and The Hallmark Channel's The Watsons Go to Birmingham.

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