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4:21 pm
Fri September 12, 2014

Criticism Of NFL Grows In Wake Of Ray Rice Case

Originally published on Fri September 12, 2014 6:32 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Men In America
4:21 pm
Fri September 12, 2014

How To Be A 21st Century 'Gentleman'

If men and women aspire to operate as equals, does a man still pay the bill on a date? Should he hold open a door? Pull out his date's chair?
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri September 12, 2014 8:40 pm

Back in 1967 the rules for dating were fairly clear-cut whether you agreed with them or not. Check out this U.S. Navy instructional video, How to Succeed with Brunettes. (What is UP with that title, anyway?)

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The Two-Way
3:50 pm
Fri September 12, 2014

Zeus The Great Dane, World's Tallest Dog, Dies

Zeus, the world's tallest dog, is no more.

The Great Dane's owner, Kevin Doorlag, told the Kalamazoo Gazette that Zeus died last week of old age. He would have turned 6 in November.

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The Two-Way
3:09 pm
Fri September 12, 2014

Toronto Mayor Rob Ford Withdraws Re-Election Bid

Toronto Mayor Rob Ford, seen here in December 2013, announced Friday that he was withdrawing his re-election bid to seek treatment for an abdominal tumor.
Chris Young The Canadian Press

Originally published on Fri September 12, 2014 4:35 pm

Toronto's scandal-prone Mayor Rob Ford has withdrawn his re-election bid, saying he is seeking treatment for a tumor in his abdomen. The man who will run in his place: his brother.

"My heart is heavy when I tell you that I'm unable to continue my campaign for re-election as your mayor," Ford said in a statement. "I have asked Doug to run to become the next Mayor of Toronto, because we need him. We cannot go backwards."

Rob Ford will instead seek a seat on the Toronto City Council.

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All Tech Considered
2:43 pm
Fri September 12, 2014

Apple Takes A Swipe At The Credit Card

Apple CEO Tim Cook speaks in Cupertino, Calif., on Tuesday. The company unveiled a new mobile payment system called Apple Pay, which uses security built into the latest iPhones.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Originally published on Fri September 12, 2014 6:12 pm

It started with the iPod. In 2001, Apple promised to do away with stacks of CDs and put 1,000 songs in your pocket. Thirteen years later, the music industry is unrecognizable: Most brick-and-mortar record stores have closed, and a pocket-size hard drive filled with music seems quaint in a world with YouTube and Spotify.

We didn't know it at the time, but the introduction of the iPod began Apple's shift from Macs to consumer electronics, which resuscitated the ailing computer-maker's fortunes and helped transform it into the world's most valuable company.

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Parallels
2:40 pm
Fri September 12, 2014

Riding The 'Silver Dragon,' Surfers Tame China's 10-Foot River Waves

A team from Honolulu, which included Jamie O'Brien of Hawaii's North Shore, won this week's surfing competition, held on one of the world's two biggest tidal bores, located in Hangzhou, China. The other is in the Amazon.
Courtesy of Wabsono

Originally published on Fri September 12, 2014 11:01 pm

The hottest surfing in China this week wasn't along some palm-fringed beach in the south, but on a muddy, sometimes trash-strewn river in the eastern city of Hangzhou.

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The Two-Way
2:27 pm
Fri September 12, 2014

10 Arrested In Pakistan Over 2012 Attack On Malala Yousafzai

Education advocate Malala Yousafzai arrives at the U.N. headquarters in New York, in August.
Niu Xiaolei Xinhua/Landov

Originally published on Fri September 12, 2014 3:26 pm

Pakistan says it has arrested 10 militants believed to have been involved in a near-fatal attack two years ago on teenage activist Malala Yousafzai.

Army spokesman Gen. Asim Saleem Bajwa said in 2012 the men had been ordered by the head of the Pakistani Taliban, Mullah Fazlullah, to kill Yousafzai, who was 15 at the time.

Despite serious head injuries, Yousafzai — who rose to prominence for her campaign against Taliban efforts to forcibly prevent girls from attending school — survived the attack.

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Goats and Soda
1:12 pm
Fri September 12, 2014

How Do You Catch Ebola: By Air, Sweat Or Water?

A mock patient is wheeled in an isolation pod during a drill at the biocontainment unit in the Nebraska Medical Center in Omaha.
Nati Harnik AP

Originally published on Fri September 12, 2014 6:49 pm

There's no question Ebola is one of the most terrifying diseases out there. It causes a painful death, typically kills more than 50 percent of those infected and essentially has no cure.

But if you compare how contagious the Ebola virus is to, say SARS or the measles, Ebola just doesn't stack up. In fact, the virus is harder to catch than the common cold.

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Krulwich Wonders...
12:51 pm
Fri September 12, 2014

What Makes A Star Starry? Is It Me?

Courtesy of Tyler Nordgen

Originally published on Fri September 12, 2014 5:55 pm

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Africa
12:49 pm
Fri September 12, 2014

Cleared Of Murder, Pistorius Found Guilty Of Culpable Homicide

Originally published on Fri September 12, 2014 1:03 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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The Two-Way
12:15 pm
Fri September 12, 2014

Solar Flare Could Trigger Auroras Tonight For Northern U.S.

NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory spacecraft captures Wednesday's solar flare eruption.
NASA/SDO

Originally published on Fri September 12, 2014 1:19 pm

Earth is in the line of fire of a powerful solar flare that has already begun hitting us, but most of the energy from the Coronal Mass Ejection, or CME, will skirt safely by, scientists say, with major disruptions to the electric grid, satellites and communications unlikely.

But if you're lucky — and far enough north — you might see a nice display of aurora borealis.

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Parallels
12:07 pm
Fri September 12, 2014

Mexican Crackdown Slows Central American Immigration To U.S.

Migrants at a shelter in southern Mexico say that Mexico's interior checkpoints are making it harder to travel north. Some have given up on reaching the U.S. and are trying to stay in Mexico.
Carrie Kahn NPR

Originally published on Fri September 12, 2014 6:32 pm

The number of Central Americans reaching the U.S. border has dropped dramatically. According to the U.S. Border Patrol, 60 percent fewer unaccompanied minors were apprehended in August than at the height of the migration crisis earlier this summer.

One factor leading to the drastic decline is an unprecedented crackdown in Mexico. Under pressure from the United States, Mexico has begun arresting and deporting tens of thousands of Central Americans long before they reach the U.S. border.

Stepped-Up Deportations

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Shots - Health News
11:45 am
Fri September 12, 2014

Health Costs Inch Up As Obamacare Kicks In

Whoa!
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri September 12, 2014 2:45 pm

Doctors and hospitals treated more patients and collected more payments in the spring as millions gained insurance coverage under the health law, new figures from the government show.

But analysts called the second-quarter increases modest and said there is little evidence to suggest that wider coverage and a recovering economy are pushing health spending growth to the painful levels of a decade ago.

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The Protojournalist
11:39 am
Fri September 12, 2014

Your Email Double: A Classic Digital Dilemma

Ron Chapple Stock istockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri September 12, 2014 1:45 pm

Now that the term Digital World has become redundant, we are able to make mistakes and encounter entanglements that no human — even Shakespeare --could ever have imagined.

Email doubles, for instance. Nearly everyone — even those of us with unusual names — has run into the dilemma. An email double who shares our name.

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Goats and Soda
11:21 am
Fri September 12, 2014

Make Way For Ambulances: They're Stuck In Bangalore Traffic

Traffic jams are a part of daily life in Bangalore. Whenever I visit my family there, I'm overwhelmed by it.

Each morning, extraordinary numbers of buses, cars, rickshaws and bikes manage to squeeze onto the city's narrow streets until they all mesh into one chaotic mass. Sometimes it's hard to tell whether traffic is moving forward or backward.

The city has become a hub for India's booming tech industry — but its roads and infrastructure haven't quite kept up.

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