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Remembrances
6:49 am
Mon July 7, 2014

Ex-Georgia President Eduard Shavardnadze Dies. He was 86

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 1:14 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Let's take a moment to remember Edward Shevardnazde. He was the foreign minister for the Soviet Union in the 1980s. That means he was one of the faces of the Soviet Union during its final period of reform under Mikhail Gorbachev. When that union broke apart, Shervardnazde became the president of his home republic, Georgia. And he has died at the age of 86. We're going to talk about Shevardnazde with Pavel Palazhchenko. He was an interpreter for both Gorbachev and this Shervardnazde. He's on the line. Welcome to the program.

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NPR Story
6:46 am
Mon July 7, 2014

'A Hard Day's Night' Premiered In London 50 Years Ago

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 4:06 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And here's our last word in Business today.

(SOUNDBITE OF FILM, "A HARD DAY'S NIGHT")

THE BEATLES: (Singing) It's been a hard day's night, and I've been working like a dog. It's been a hard day's night, I should be sleeping like a log.

INSKEEP: You hear the screaming in the background. "A Hard Day's Night" premiered at London's Pavilion Theater on July 6, 1964.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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NPR Story
6:46 am
Mon July 7, 2014

Wash. Retailers To Sell Recreational Marijuana On Tuesday

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 1:14 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

NPR Story
5:21 am
Mon July 7, 2014

Video Of Extremist Sunni Group's Leader Needs To Be Confirmed

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 1:14 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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NPR Story
5:21 am
Mon July 7, 2014

CBS Lost Appetite For Government Watchdog Stories, Attkisson Says

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 1:14 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

When investigative reporter Sharyl Attkisson left CBS this year, she did not go quietly. She contends, the network refused to run stories that might damage President Obama. And her claims have become a flashpoint in arguments over ideological bias in the media. NPR's David Folkenflik has more.

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NPR Story
5:21 am
Mon July 7, 2014

Michelle Obama Lobbies Congress Over School Lunch Program

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 1:14 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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U.S.
3:18 am
Mon July 7, 2014

A Presidential Contest ... For Obama's Library

This undated file photo released by Obama for America shows Barack Obama teaching at the University of Chicago Law School in Chicago, where he was a faculty member for more than a decade. The university is contending for his presidential library.
AP

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 1:14 pm

There are 13 presidential Libraries in the United States run by the National Archives, and when President Obama leaves office, the construction of the 14th library won't be far behind.

A nonprofit foundation created to fund and build the Obama presidential library is already beginning to mull proposals from contenders who'd like to be home to the facility.

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Shots - Health News
3:18 am
Mon July 7, 2014

For Many Americans, Stress Takes A Toll On Health And Family

Leif Parsons for NPR

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 1:14 pm

Stress is part of the human condition, unavoidable and even necessary to a degree. But too much stress can be toxic — even disabling.

And there's a lot of toxic stress out there.

A national poll done by NPR with our partners at the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health finds that more than 1 in every 4 Americans say they had a great deal of stress in the previous month.

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The Salt
3:17 am
Mon July 7, 2014

Raw Milk Producers Aim To Regulate Themselves

Charlotte Smith, of Champoeg Creamery in St. Paul, Ore., says raw milk may offer health benefits. But she also acknowledges its very real dangers.
Courtesy of Champoeg Creamery

Originally published on Wed July 9, 2014 9:45 am

A growing number of Americans are buying raw milk. That's milk that has not been pasteurized to kill bacteria.

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National Security
3:16 am
Mon July 7, 2014

The Marines Are Looking For A Few Good (Combat-Ready) Women

Sgt. Jarrod Simmons speaks to his squad of Marines before they head out on a training march with 55-pound packs on Feb. 22, 2013, at Camp Lejeune, N.C. The Marines and the other military branches must open combat jobs to women in 2016. More than 160 female Marines are taking part in a grueling training program that begins this summer.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 8, 2014 9:51 am

The challenge for the Marines, and for the Army, is how to open up ground combat jobs to women in January 2016, without lowering standards.

And here's where things stand in the Marines.

Eighty-five female Marines already made it through an infantry training course last fall at Camp Lejeune, N.C., which included drills such as attacking a mock enemy force, hidden in a pine forest. That course lasted eight weeks, and the men and women all completed the same training.

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Middle East
6:51 pm
Sun July 6, 2014

Six Israeli Youths Arrested In Death Of Palestinian Teen

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Israel arrested six Israeli Jewish suspects today in connection with the kidnapping and murder of a 16-year-old Palestinian teenager. It's the first major development in a case that's sparked riots in Jerusalem and Arab towns in Israel. The teenager was seized from his home in East Jerusalem last week, and his charred body was found in a nearby forest. Officials say the autopsy shows he was burned to death.

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Around the Nation
6:48 pm
Sun July 6, 2014

Programs Target Poverty In Obama's 5 'Promise Zones'

People line up at the FamilySource Center in Los Angeles, an organization in one of President Obama's five designated "Promise Zones" that aims to help fight poverty in the area.
Priska Neely NPR

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 11:02 am

Five areas across the country have been designated as "Promise Zones" by the federal government. These zones, announced by President Obama in January, are intended to tackle poverty by focusing on individual urban neighborhoods and rural areas.

In the five Promise Zones — located in Philadelphia, San Antonio, southeastern Kentucky, the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma and Los Angeles — the idea is to basically carpet-bomb the neighborhoods with programs like after-school classes, GED courses and job training to turn those areas around.

What Happens In The Zone?

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Movie Interviews
5:33 pm
Sun July 6, 2014

The Life And Death Of 'The Internet's Own Boy'

Aaron Swartz was heavily involved in the popular 2012 campaign to prevent the passage of the federal Stop Online Piracy Act, or SOPA.
Quinn Norton Falco Ink Publicity

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 8:48 am

Aaron Swartz was a programmer, a hacker, a freedom of information activist — and a casualty of suicide.

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U.S.
5:33 pm
Sun July 6, 2014

Increasing Use Of Oil Trains Inspires Backlash From States

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 12:18 pm

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

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Music Interviews
5:05 pm
Sun July 6, 2014

Years After 'The Killing Moon,' Echo & The Bunnymen Still At It

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 6:55 pm

The band Echo & The Bunnymen has released its first new album in five years, called Meteorites. NPR's Kelly McEvers talks with frontman Ian McCulloch about the release.

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