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NPR Story
5:07 am
Thu March 26, 2015

Ex-OU Student Apologizes For Racist Chant On Fraternity Bus

Originally published on Thu March 26, 2015 9:17 am

Copyright 2015 KGOU-FM. To see more, visit http://www.kgou.org.

NPR Story
5:07 am
Thu March 26, 2015

South African Mercenaries Play Crucial Role In Fight Against Boko Haram

Originally published on Thu March 26, 2015 9:17 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

NPR Story
5:07 am
Thu March 26, 2015

Migrants Try To Enter Europe Through Spanish Territory In Africa

Originally published on Thu March 26, 2015 9:17 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Shots - Health News
3:52 am
Thu March 26, 2015

Why Doctors Are Trying A Skin Cancer Drug To Treat A Brain Tumor

MaryAnn Anselmo has started to sing again after recovering from brain surgery and having successful treatment with a drug that targeted a mutation in her tumor cells.
Dave Gershgorn/WNYC

Originally published on Thu March 26, 2015 5:06 pm

MaryAnn Anselmo feared for the worst when she was diagnosed with a brain tumor called a glioblastoma in late 2013.

"You start doing research on that type of tumor, and you're saying, 'Oh my God, you're history.' It's like a death sentence," says, Anselmo, now 59.

Only for her it wasn't.

Anselmo's successful treatment shows how precision medicine — tailoring therapy to each patient's genetic needs — is beginning to transform cancer care.

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Goats and Soda
3:50 am
Thu March 26, 2015

Don't Torpedo The Dam, Full Speed Ahead For Ethiopia's Nile Project

The Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam is under construction near Assosa, Ethiopia. When it's completed, the dam will have be able to produce 6,000 megawatts of electricity, making it the biggest hydroelectric power station in Africa.
Elias Asmare AP

Originally published on Thu March 26, 2015 10:06 am

I once met a popular spoken word poet in Ethiopia who was asked by a government official to write a poem about the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam. (He politely explained that he didn't do poetry about infrastructure.) But it's not surprising that Ethiopia would like to inscribe this dam into the Ethiopian epic.

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Around the Nation
3:49 am
Thu March 26, 2015

Closure Of Private Prison Forces Texas County To Plug Financial Gap

A riot late last month forced officials to close the Willacy County Correcitonal Center in Wallcy County, Texas.
John Burnett NPR

Originally published on Thu March 26, 2015 9:17 am

The Willacy County Correctional Center is empty now. The tall security fences and dome-like housing units set out on the coastal prairie have no one inside them.

One morning late last month, the prisoners rioted. They set fires and tore the place up. Guards put down the uprising in about five hours. But the destruction was so severe that the sprawling detention compound has been shut down. All 2,800 inmates were transferred.

Willacy County is now facing the question — what does it do now that its biggest moneymaker is out of business?

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It's All Politics
3:48 am
Thu March 26, 2015

Is Capitol Hill Ready To Rest Its Near-Annual 'Doc Fix' Exercise?

If Reps. Nancy Pelosi and John Boehner win and their plan becomes law, it would kill what's known on Capitol Hill as the "doc fix."
David McNew Getty Images

Originally published on Thu March 26, 2015 12:11 pm

Updated at 12:10 p.m. E.T.

Doctors who treat Medicare patients will face a huge cut, 21 percent, if Congress doesn't act by the end of the month. This isn't a new problem. While Democrats and Republicans on Capitol Hill agree that the formula that pays doctors who treat Medicare patients has long been broken, over the years they've been unable to pass more than temporary patches.

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News
7:18 pm
Wed March 25, 2015

How returning home after years in the US gets complicated

Mexico's Yucatán Peninsula juts into the Caribbean like a defiant fist and, 3,000 miles away, the San Francisco Bay Area looks like a miniature version of it.

The two may be separated by distance, but they depend on each other. The Yucatán needs the work and San Francisco needs the workers. Their decades-long relationship has developed into something of a love affair, which returning migrants find hard to forget.

But for the migrants' relatives who've stayed behind, the benefits of immigration have begun to lose their luster.

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Law
7:14 pm
Wed March 25, 2015

California Attorney General Moves To Stop Anti-Gay Ballot Proposal

Originally published on Wed March 25, 2015 8:00 pm

NPR's Robert Siegel talks to Vikram Amar, a law professor at the University of California, Davis, about the attorney general's move to halt a proposed initiative that would allow gays and lesbians to be "put to death by bullets to the head."

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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News
6:23 pm
Wed March 25, 2015

A crash in Europe lays bare some of aviation's myths

A teddy bear wearing a shirt with the word "flight attendant" is placed between flowers and candles outside Germanwings headquarters at the Cologne Bonn airport on March 25, 2015.

Wolfgang Rattay/Reuters

Officials are still trying to figure out why an Airbus A320 flown by discount airline Germanwings slammed into the French Alps on Tuesday, killing all 150 passengers on board.

One possible explanation for the crash is that something went wrong with the highly automated jet's computers, but not everyone thinks that's the key to unlocking this mystery. 

"Computers are not flying your plane," says airline pilot Patrick Smith. "Pilots are flying your plane through the automation, and the automation is only as good as the pilots controlling it."  

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News
5:56 pm
Wed March 25, 2015

'They didn't just see a wrestler die, they watched a superhero die'

Wrestling superstar Perro Aguayo, Jr. was part of the sport's royalty in Mexico, the son of another superstar wrestler from the 1970s. Both men were known for "La Lanza," a double-footed stomp that devastated opponents. But we'll never see La Lanza again.

Aguayo died early Saturday morning, after a match on Friday night, sending shockwaves through Mexico.

"It was something very, very tragic," says fellow wrestler Marco Corleone of Mexico City. "The whole world watched him die in front of our eyes. That's the weirdest part of it all."

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News
5:49 pm
Wed March 25, 2015

Before Barack Obama: The young Michelle Obama

Craig Robinson and his little sister, the future Michelle Obama, as kids in Chicago.

Obama campaign photo

Before she met Barack Obama, the future first lady had enjoyed a close family life and strong schooling, showing a competitive streak and a summer where she had a cursing problem. The then-Michelle Robinson also faced brushes with tight budgets and racial discrimination, according to her biographer, Peter Slevin. Here are seven details on her early years from Slevin's just-published "Michelle Obama: A Life.''

1. Four people, one bathroom

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The Salt
5:28 pm
Wed March 25, 2015

Heinz And Kraft: Before They Were Food Giants, They Were Men

Henry J. Heinz
Library of Congress

Originally published on Wed March 25, 2015 8:00 pm

Heinz and Kraft.

When we hear those names we think ketchup and Velveeta, right?

But before they were products and companies that will merge to become a giant with $28 billion in revenue, Heinz and Kraft were men.

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News
5:23 pm
Wed March 25, 2015

California's gardens tell an immigrant story

Business-minded immigrants often turn to gardening work because the start-up costs are relatively modest — namely the price of the truck and the gardening equipment.

Saul Gonzalez

The people who run California's ever-buzzing leaf blowers, weed whackers and lawnmowers are almost always Latino immigrant men. They call themselves jardineros, Spanish for gardeners, and it’s their labor that gives curb appeal to so many homes, keeping lawns neatly trimmed, hedges pruned and weeds at bay.

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The Two-Way
5:23 pm
Wed March 25, 2015

In Havana, A Journey Into The Forbidden With A Provocative Artist

Cuban artist Tania Bruguera poses for a photograph near the statue of José Martí in Havana's Revolution Plaza. She was arrested in December for planning a political performance there.
Eyder Peralta NPR

Originally published on Wed March 25, 2015 8:00 pm

It was still dark when Tania Bruguera hopped into a cab with us on her way to Revolution Square.

"All of a sudden it looks quite subversive what we're doing," she said. Her voice revealed a little nervousness, but it translated into a giddy laughter.

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