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The Two-Way
6:45 am
Thu February 13, 2014

Will Comcast Get Federal OK To Buy Time Warner?

Gene J. Puskar AP

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 10:44 am

(We put a new top on this story at 9:25 a.m. ET and added an update at 10:15 a.m. ET.)

As NPR's David Folkenflik pointed out earlier today, Comcast's proposed $45 billion purchase of fellow cable company Time Warner will receive some scrutiny from federal officials. Here's some more about that part of the story:

Politico writes that:

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The Two-Way
6:03 am
Thu February 13, 2014

Winter Storm Shuts Northeast; South Still Reeling

Snow was piling up along Manhattan's Fifth Avenue early Thursday morning.
Carlo Allegri Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 8:13 pm

(We're adding details to this post as the day continues.)

The forecasters said it would be "crippling," "mind-boggling" and historic.

Well, this time around we can't complain about them getting it wrong.

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Music News
5:39 am
Thu February 13, 2014

Heavy Rotation: Shlohmo & Jeremih

Originally published on Tue February 18, 2014 8:22 am

Each month NPR Music asks public radio hosts and DJs to pick a favorite new song. Today we'll hear from Jason King, host of I'll Take You There, NPR Music's new 24 hour Soul and R&B stream. He's talking about his pick for Heavy Rotation: "No More" by Jeremih and Shlohmo.

National Security
5:39 am
Thu February 13, 2014

In Security Cases, Feds No Longer Get Benefit Of The Doubt

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 7:29 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Steve Inskeep.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

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NPR Story
5:39 am
Thu February 13, 2014

Regardless Of The Weather, Don't Put Your Tongue On A Pole

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 7:29 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Science
3:03 am
Thu February 13, 2014

Ancient DNA Ties Native Americans From Two Continents To Clovis

Until recently, finding characteristic stone and bone tools was the only way to trace the fate of the Clovis people, whose culture appeared in North America about 13,000 years ago.
Sarah L. Anzick Nature

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 8:01 pm

The mysterious Clovis culture, which appeared in North America about 13,000 years ago, appears to be the forerunner of Native Americans throughout the Americas, according to a study in Nature. Scientists have read the genetic sequence of a baby from a Clovis burial site in Montana to help fill out the story of the earliest Americans.

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Politics
3:02 am
Thu February 13, 2014

'Citizens United' Critics Fight Money With Money

A woman signs a giant banner printed with the preamble to the U.S. Constitution during a demonstration against the Citizens United ruling in Washington in October 2010.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 11:19 am

It's been four years since the Supreme Court's controversial Citizens United ruling, the case that set the stage for unlimited and often undisclosed contribution money in federal elections. This year, the superPACs and social welfare organizations that use that money for attack ads are already at it, even as Republicans and Democrats are still choosing their candidates for the fall campaigns.

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All Tech Considered
3:01 am
Thu February 13, 2014

Through The Internet, Gay Teens Connected To Larger Community

Emily Kitfield, 16, says she's not sure if she would have been able to come out to her parents and community without being able to reach out to others online.
Courtesy of Emily Kitfield

In the past 20 years, the Internet has significantly impacted what it means to grow up as a gay kid in this country.

Before the Web, many gay young people grew up in what seemed to be isolation, particularly those in small towns. But with the advent of online chat rooms and Websites dedicated to gay culture, communities formed, and that demographic began finding new support.

That change can be seen in the experiences of two women who grew up in the same town, two decades apart.

'The Only One'

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Parallels
3:00 am
Thu February 13, 2014

Greeks Find Hope In The Theater Of Nostalgia

Greek vocal icon Marinella (center) sings "Children of Greece," a song once sung to Greek soldiers as Italian and German forces invaded the country. As they endure hard times today, Greeks are turning to theater that shows triumphs over adversity in the previous century.
Badminton Theater

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 2:23 pm

It's a full house at the 2,000-seat Badminton Theater in Athens. On stage is a musical about the singer Sofia Vembo, whose warm contralto voice comforted Greeks during World War II.

The song that is bringing the audience, mostly Greeks in their 60s and 70s, to tears and applause is called "Paida Tis Ellados, Paidia," or "Children of Greece." Vembo sang it to Greek soldiers as Italian and German forces invaded the country.

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The Two-Way
12:22 am
Thu February 13, 2014

Reports: Comcast To Buy Time Warner

Comcast is expected to announce its acquisition of Time Warner on Thursday, various media outlets report.

Bloomberg, citing "four people familiar with matter," says Comcast will buy the cable company for about $44 billion, "combining the largest two U.S. cable companies in an all-stock deal."

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Remembrances
5:53 pm
Wed February 12, 2014

Sid Caesar, Who Got Laughs Without Politics Or Putdowns, Dies At 91

Actor/comedian Sid Caesar
NBC NBC via Getty Images

Originally published on Wed February 12, 2014 8:00 pm

Comedian Sid Caesar, one of early network TV's biggest stars, died Wednesday morning at his home in Beverly Hills. He was 91.

Caesar didn't do smut, putdowns or smarmy remarks. Instead, he did skits: grown-up, gentle comedy for the whole family.

In one skit, Caesar was the smarter-than-anyone German "professor." Carl Reiner played a movie executive with money problems. The professor's solution? Make a musical — and get the greatest composer in the world. He is shocked to discover that his top choice won't be available.

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Shots - Health News
5:53 pm
Wed February 12, 2014

After January Surge, 3.3 Million Have Enrolled In Obamacare

Insurance guides work the phone bank at MnSure, Minnesota's health exchange, in St. Paul, Minn., in December.
Jim Mone AP

Originally published on Fri February 14, 2014 5:46 pm

January was a miserable month for weather, but the wintry blasts in much of the country weren't enough to stop people from shopping for health insurance.

More than 1.1 million people signed up for coverage through state and federal health exchanges in January, according to a just-released report, bringing the total to just shy of 3.3 million people.

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It's All Politics
5:11 pm
Wed February 12, 2014

Election Panel: Long Lines Were Management Problem

Robert Bauer (far left) and Benjamin Ginsberg (far right) are co-chairmen of the president's Commission on Election Administration, appointed to find solutions to election-related issues.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Originally published on Wed February 12, 2014 8:48 pm

The commission President Obama appointed last year to figure out how to fix long lines at the polls and other election problems has sought to steer clear of the many partisan land mines surrounding how Americans vote.

The two co-chairmen of the panel continued to that navigation Wednesday as they presented their unanimous recommendations to the Senate Rules Committee.

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Shots - Health News
5:05 pm
Wed February 12, 2014

Latest Evidence Against Mammograms Adds To Women's Uncertainty

Mammograms are a key screening tool for breast cancer. But critics say they're not good enough.
Salih Dastan iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri February 14, 2014 4:56 pm

Mammograms don't reduce the number of women dying from breast cancer, according to a large and long-term Canadian study. It's the latest chunk of data to raise questions in an increasingly partisan debate about the use of mammograms to screen for cancer.

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The Two-Way
4:59 pm
Wed February 12, 2014

Comedian And Actor Sid Caesar Has Died At 91

Sid Caesar and Imogene Coca in a scene from Your Show of Shows. Caesar, whose sketches lit up 1950s television, died Wednesday at 91.
AP

The multitalented Sid Caesar took live and complex comedy skits on the air as a pioneer in 1950s TV. Caesar, who established a new comedic tradition in America before he was 30, died in Los Angeles on Wednesday at 91.

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