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The Two-Way
8:22 am
Fri February 7, 2014

Biden: 'No Obvious Reason' He Shouldn't Run For President

Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri February 7, 2014 10:35 am

He's far behind former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton in a recent poll of Democrats, but Vice President Joe Biden tells CNN that "there's no obvious reason" why he shouldn't seek his party's 2016 presidential nomination.

The network reports that:

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Education
8:17 am
Fri February 7, 2014

What's Wrong With Getting Help On A 'Personal' Essay?

Rhodes Scholars study at Oxford for at least a year.
iStockphoto

Applying for a Rhodes Scholarship this year? A new rule means you won't be able to get any help writing or editing your application essay.

The organization that hands out the prestigious scholarship says American students have been sending in too many "formulaic" and "predictable" essays. They usually go something like this, according to Charles Conn, warden of the Rhodes House at Oxford and CEO of the Rhodes Trust:

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The Two-Way
8:10 am
Fri February 7, 2014

Dogs Do Their Doodies And Salmon Swim Home Magnetically

A fish that knows the way to go: the Chinook salmon, which appears to use the Earth's magnetic field to navigate ocean waters and rivers.
Jeff T. Green Getty Images

Originally published on Fri February 7, 2014 10:40 am

You might say we're attracted to this kind of story:

Last month, there was the news that Czech researchers believe that dogs prefer to align themselves along "the North-South axis under calm [magnetic field] conditions" when they're dropping those deposits that we owners have to pick up.

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The Two-Way
6:50 am
Fri February 7, 2014

Job Growth Less Than Expected, But Unemployment Hits 5-Year Low

Frederic J. Brown AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri February 7, 2014 1:06 pm

Note: This post was updated several times after the jobs report was released at 8:30 a.m. ET.

The nation's unemployment rate slipped to 6.6 percent in January from 6.7 percent a month before, but employers added only 113,000 jobs to their payrolls last month, the Bureau of Labor Statistics reported Friday morning.

The jobless rate figure was expected. The job growth number, however, was well below the 185,000 that economists expected.

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Economy
5:03 am
Fri February 7, 2014

January Unemployment Numbers Expected To Rebound

Originally published on Fri February 7, 2014 11:26 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

On a Friday this is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. There's lots of anticipation about the government's monthly jobs report that will be released later this morning. Last month's job creation numbers were very disappointing - just 74,000 jobs added to the payroll - far below the recent monthly averages. NPR's John Ydstie joined us to talk about job creation and what it's telling us about the economy. Good morning.

JOHN YDSTIE, BYLINE: Hi, Renee.

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Politics
4:58 am
Fri February 7, 2014

GOP Still Looking At Pieces Of Debt Limit 'Puzzle'

Originally published on Fri February 7, 2014 3:40 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene.

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And I'm Renee Montagne. Today at the stroke of noon in Washington D. C. the U.S. Treasury statutory authority to borrow money will expire.

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NPR Story
4:58 am
Fri February 7, 2014

Penguins Are Depressed By Lack Of Sun

Originally published on Fri February 7, 2014 11:26 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning, I'm Renee Montagne. It's been a dreary winter but a penguin should be used to it, right? Not those at the Sea Life Center in England. Those humble penguins are natives of coastal South America - far from the U.K.'s endless wind and rain. The black and white birds were feeling so blue from the miserable weather the zoo staff worried they'd get sick. They prescribed antidepressants and the penguins perked up. Now they're hoping for a little sunshine. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Fine Art
3:28 am
Fri February 7, 2014

Behind The Movie, Tales From The Real-Life 'Monuments Men'

Ettlinger at age 22, after his stint in the army.
Courtesy George Ettlinger

Originally published on Fri February 7, 2014 4:17 pm

It's not often that a big-budget Hollywood film turns its attention to art historians and curators. But that's the subject of The Monuments Men, opening this weekend at a multiplex near you.

George Clooney stars in and directs the story, about a special group of soldiers tasked with protecting the masterpieces of European culture during the chaos of World War II and its aftermath. But as you might expect, the real story of the Monuments Men — and women — is messier and less glamorous than the Hollywood version.

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StoryCorps
3:25 am
Fri February 7, 2014

Escaping Forced Prostitution And Leaving The Shame Behind

Barbara Amaya and her daughter, Bianca Belteton, at a visit to StoryCorps in Arlington, Va.
StoryCorps

Originally published on Fri February 7, 2014 11:26 am

It hasn't been easy for Barbara Amaya to talk about her past. She was abused at home as a child, and when she was 12 she ran away to Washington, D.C. — where she was picked up by sex traffickers and forced into prostitution.

"I fell into the hands of a woman. I was sitting in the park and she just started talking to me," Barbara tells her daughter, Bianca Belteton, on a visit to StoryCorps in Arlington, Va.

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Around the Nation
3:25 am
Fri February 7, 2014

Post Office Could Rack Up Billions By Offering Money Services

U.S. Postal Service clerks help customers at the Los Feliz Post Office in Los Angeles.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Originally published on Fri February 7, 2014 11:26 am

As the U.S. Postal Service continues to lose money each year, a new report suggests a way to add to its bottom line: offer banklike services, such as a check cashing card that would allow holders to make purchases and pay bills online or even take out small loans. The idea is to provide services that are now unavailable in many communities.

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The Edge
3:23 am
Fri February 7, 2014

In Team Event, Figure Skating Rivals Cheer For Each Other

Marissa Castelli (front center) and Simon Shnapir (front right) of the U.S. wait for their scores in the pairs short program Thursday in Sochi. With them are coach Robert Martin and teammates (back, from left) Jeremy Abbott, Charlie White and Meryl Davis.
Darren Cummings/Pool Getty Images

Originally published on Fri February 7, 2014 11:26 am

There's always a lot of drama in figure skating, and not necessarily on the ice. There's the judging and the personalities — think Nancy Kerrigan and Tonya Harding.

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The Two-Way
3:22 am
Fri February 7, 2014

U.S. Still Working For Syria Resolution, Envoy To U.N. Says

Samantha Power, the U.S. ambassador to the U.N., addresses the Security Council on Monday.
Craig Ruttle AP

Originally published on Fri February 7, 2014 11:26 am

The U.S. ambassador to the U.N. says the United States is looking at various solutions to bring about a political resolution to the civil war in Syria.

"What President Obama has instructed all of us to do is just look under every stone, look at every tool that we have in the toolbox and see what we can deploy so that we don't confront a choice between doing nothing on the one hand and sending in the Marines on the other," Samantha Power, the envoy, told NPR's Renee Montagne.

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The Edge
6:29 pm
Thu February 6, 2014

In Sochi, An Olympic Artist Sees The 'Possible'

Artist Marc Ahr has been drawing at all the Olympic Games since 1992, but for him, Sochi is special.
Sam Sanders NPR

Originally published on Thu February 6, 2014 8:50 pm

The thing about Sochi and the surrounding area, and the sidewalks, and the roads, and the land around the train tracks, is the construction. It is everywhere — in places where some might see it and say, "Wait, it doesn't matter. This will not be on TV. No one important is staying here. Just let it go." Miles away from any venue or lodging or Olympic rings.

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Around the Nation
6:29 pm
Thu February 6, 2014

Another Florida Case Puts 'Stand Your Ground' Back In Court

Michael Dunn (right), who faces first-degree murder charges in the death of 17-year-old Jordan Davis, stands with his attorney Cory Strolla (left) at Duval County Courthouse in Jacksonville, Fla., on Thursday.
Bob Mack Florida Times-Union/Landov

Originally published on Thu February 6, 2014 7:55 pm

They're events that took just several minutes, but in a courtroom in Jacksonville, Fla., on Thursday, prosecutors and the defense laid out different versions of how Michael Dunn, who is white, came to shoot and kill Jordan Davis, a black teen.

It was in 2012, the day after Thanksgiving, that Davis, 17, and three friends stopped at a gas station and convenience store in Jacksonville. They were in an SUV and were playing their music — loud.

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Politics
6:29 pm
Thu February 6, 2014

As Deficit Anxiety Fades, Debt Rears Its Ugly Head

President Obama tours a Costco location in Lanham, Md., on Jan. 29, before speaking about raising the federal minimum wage.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu February 6, 2014 7:55 pm

Democrats and Republicans have exhausted themselves politically after failing to reach a grand bargain to reduce the debt. Now there's a new economic debate in Washington over economic growth, mobility and income inequality.

But without dealing with the debt, Republicans and Democrats might not be able to navigate even the issues they agree on.

Moving Away From The Deficit

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