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The Two-Way
5:57 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

Oklahoma Approves Nitrogen Asphyxiation For Executions

Originally published on Sat April 18, 2015 1:02 pm

Oklahoma Gov. Mary Fallin signed a law today allowing nitrogen to be used in executions in the state in case lethal injection is ruled unconstitutional or the drugs are not available.

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News
5:55 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

Foreigners in South Africa arm themselves to fend off anti-immigrant riots

An African immigrant holds a machete in Johannesburg, South Africa. Immigrants have complained about a lack of police protection and some have started to arm themselves.

Siphiwe Sibeko/Reuters

Police in South Africa battled rioters on Friday as mobs tried to attack immigrants and immigrant-owned businesses in the country.

“We saw running battles,” says the BBC’s Milton Nkosi, who spent the day in Jeppestown, near Johannesburg. “The police had to fire rubber bullets [and] tear gas to try to keep the looting mob, who are the locals, away from the frightened foreigners and their businesses.”

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News
5:53 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

CBC tries to close the book on sexual harassment and start anew with 'q'

Canada's CBC is trying to move on from an embarassing incident of sexual harassment involving Jian Ghomeshi, the former host of its signature radio program, Q.

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News
5:50 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

For decades, NASA has woken up its astronauts with music

Apollo 7 astronauts were, from left, Donn Eisele, Walter Schirra, and Walter Cunningham, in 1968.

NASA

At least as far back as the Gemini missions, NASA has given its astronauts a musical wake-up call.

It all began when Gemini astronauts Walter “Wally” Schirra and Tom Stafford were serenaded from earth with the show tune, “Hello Dolly!” according to NASA’s chief historian, Bill Barry.  

“Wally was known as a big jokester and I suspect he was surprised. I suspect there’s some kind of inside joke, knowing Wally Schirra.”

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World
5:44 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

Syrian Government Believed To Be Behind Chlorine Gas Attack

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 10:05 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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Sports
5:44 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

NBA Players Union Head Michele Roberts Says No Lockout Expected

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 10:05 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Goats and Soda
5:20 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

As Ebola Cases Dwindle, West Africa Turns To Economic Recovery

Liberian workers dismantle shelters in an Ebola treatment center in the Paynes Ville neighborhood of Monrovia. Doctors Without Borders closed the center last month because it was no longer needed.
Zoom Dosso AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 6:28 pm

West Africa is about to receive a hefty infusion of cash. This Friday the World Bank unveiled a major aid package for the three West African countries at the center of this past year's Ebola epidemic.

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The Two-Way
5:20 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

First-Place Fake-Out: Woman Who Didn't Run Marathon Stripped Of Title

Last Sunday, runner Kendall Schler was the first to cross the finish line at the GO! St. Louis Marathon. She received a $1,500 check and a photograph with Jackie Joyner-Kersee at the finish line. Trouble is Schler of Columbia, Mo., had not run the entire 26.2-mile course.

That's not all. Schler, race organizers say, also faked her third-place finish at last year's race – with a time that allowed her to qualify for the prestigious Boston Marathon this year.

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The Salt
4:39 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

Running A Marathon? How To Eat and Drink So You Don't Hit The Wall

Performance nutrition experts recommend stopping at all the hydration stations for a quick fill-up of a sports drink to replenish the glycogen that's being burned during a marathon.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 4:58 pm

Elite runners know the drill. When you run a marathon, you've got to consume extra amounts of carbohydrate — either from food or energy gels or energy drinks — in order to go the distance.

And if you don't fuel up enough? You may hit the wall during the big event, which, believe me, is pretty miserable.

The wall comes on abruptly. Suddenly your legs feel like lead. And then you're woozy.

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Book Reviews
4:34 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

Book Review: Rachel Kushner, 'The Strange Case Of Rachel K'

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 10:05 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Remembrances
4:34 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

Bill Arhos, 'Austin City Limits' Founder, Dies At 80

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 10:05 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

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Back in 1974, an up-and-coming musician stepped onto the stage of a brand-new show on PBS called "Austin City Limits."

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "AUSTIN CITY LIMITS")

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It's All Politics
4:34 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

Oklahoma City Bombing A 'Wake-Up Call' For Government Security

The Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building was "literally right up against the road so it was extremely vulnerable," said architect Barbara Nadel. One of the government's first responses was to close a two-block stretch of Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the White House.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat April 18, 2015 1:22 pm

Twenty years ago this Sunday, a truck bomb exploded next to the Alfred P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City. One hundred sixty-eight people were killed in the blast, hundreds were injured.

The bombing prompted heightened security at federal buildings — around the nation, and especially here in Washington.

One of the government's first responses to the bombing was closing a two-block stretch of Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the White House.

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NPR Ed
4:34 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

In New Orleans, A Second-Chance School Tries Again

Students arrive at CLA. More than half end up here after being expelled from other schools, usually for fighting, weapons or drugs.
LA Johnson NPR

Originally published on Sat April 18, 2015 8:28 pm

Principal Nicholas Dean looks at his scarred, broken office door with resignation.

"Time to get a new lock," he says.

Over the weekend, a person or persons smashed into his office, found the keys to the school van and drove off in it.

It's another day at Crescent Leadership Academy, one of New Orleans' three second-chance schools for students who have not been successful elsewhere.

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Around the Nation
4:34 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

As Lake Mead Levels Drop, The West Braces For Bigger Drought Impact

Lake Mead is at its lowest levels since it was built in the late 1930s.
Kirk Siegler NPR

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 10:05 pm

The historic four-year drought in California has been grabbing the headlines lately, but there's a much bigger problem facing the West: the now 14-year drought gripping the Colorado River basin.

One of the most stunning places to see its impact is at the nation's largest reservoir, Lake Mead, near Las Vegas. At about 40 percent of capacity, it's the lowest it's been since it was built in the 1930s.

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Remembrances
4:34 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

Remembering Don Quayle, NPR's First President

Don Quayle, the first president of NPR, has died at the age of 84.
Sam Kittner WAMU 88.5

Originally published on Fri April 17, 2015 10:05 pm

The first president of National Public Radio has died. Don Quayle was 84 years old. He had a long career in public broadcasting — both television and radio. NPR's Susan Stamberg reflects on his impact.

Don Quayle gave me my first radio job. It was the early '60s and he was head of the Educational Radio Network — the precursor of NPR — a skinny little network of 12 East Coast stations that developed a daily drive-time news show. He hired me to help produce it. When this national network arose, he was an obvious choice to run it.

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