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4:58 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

Sluggish Start To Holiday Sales May Mean More Price Cuts

Shoppers crowd a Macy's store in New York on Thursday. Many retailers stayed open on Thanksgiving Day this year, a new holiday tradition that analysts say is here to stay.
John Minchillo AP

Originally published on Mon December 2, 2013 5:53 pm

Despite retailers offering Thanksgiving hours and more online sales, Americans still nervous about the economy spent less this long weekend than they did last year, according to preliminary estimates.

But analysts say retailers will be working harder to boost sales in coming weeks by offering even deeper discounts.

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NPR Story
4:54 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

Investigation Of New York Train Derailment Continues

Originally published on Mon December 2, 2013 7:12 pm

Transportation officials are investigating what caused a Metro-North Railroad passenger train to derail along the Hudson River in New York on Sunday morning. The crash left four dead and injured dozens more.

NPR Story
4:54 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

ACLU Sues, Claiming Catholic Hospitals Put Women At Risk

Archbishop Joseph William Tobin of Indianapolis prays at the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops' annual fall meeting in Baltimore on Nov. 12.
Patrick Semansky AP

Originally published on Mon December 2, 2013 7:50 pm

The American Civil Liberties Union has decided to go directly to the source of its unhappiness with the way women are treated in Catholic hospitals. It's suing the nation's Catholic bishops.

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NPR Story
4:54 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

Ukranians Face Choice Between EU And Russia

Originally published on Mon December 2, 2013 7:12 pm

Thousands of Ukrainian protesters blockaded government buildings in Kiev Monday seeking to oust President Viktor Yanukovich. Demonstrations over the weekend drew as many as 350,000 people in the largest rally since the Orange Revolution. The protests came after Yanukovich decided to abandon a trade deal with the European Union and instead seek closer ties with Russia. Robert Siegel talks to Steven Pifer, former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine, about the political landscape in the country and its relationship with Moscow.

The Two-Way
4:44 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

Croat Group Sues Bob Dylan For Racism In France

Bob Dylan performs at Vieilles Charrues music festival on July 22, 2012, in Carhaix-Plouguer, France. The singer is being sued by a France-based Croat organization for racism.
Fred Tanneau AFP/Getty Images

Think twice — it may not be all right.

Bob Dylan is being sued by a France-based Croatian organization for alleged racism following an interview last year in which the music legend loosely compared Croats and Nazis.

France has strict laws against hate speech, and the Council of Croats in France says it wants an apology from Dylan.

His "comments were an incitement to hatred," Vlatko Maric, the group's secretary said, according to The Guardian.

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The Two-Way
4:03 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

WATCH: A 'Geese Tsunami' In Canada

Hundreds of geese take flight.
YouTube

Originally published on Mon December 2, 2013 4:07 pm

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Planet Money
3:57 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

Nixon And Kimchi: How The Garment Industry Came To Bangladesh

There are more than 4,000 garment factories in Bangladesh. One way or another, most of them trace their lineage to Abdul Majid Chowdhury, Noorul Quader and the 128 Bangladeshis who traveled to Korea 30 years ago.
Kainaz Amaria NPR

Originally published on Fri December 27, 2013 10:35 am

More details were added to this post after it was published. The new information was courtesy of Vidiya Khan, director of the Desh Group, and daughter of Noorul Quader.

Bangladesh was created out of chaos in the early 1970s, at a moment when millions in the country were dying from a combination of war and famine. The future looked exceedingly bleak.

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The Two-Way
3:47 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

Amazon's Drone Has Many Asking 'What Could Go Wrong?'

Buzzing to a neighborhood near you? Amazon.com's Prime Air prototype may someday fly small packages right to customers' homes.
AP

Originally published on Mon December 2, 2013 6:37 pm

The news that Amazon is hoping to one day use semi-autonomous drones to deliver small packages to customers has many asking a familiar question:

What could go wrong?

Check this tweet:

"An Amazon drone!? What could go wrong?! 'They're autonomous' - this is how the Terminator started FYI..."

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Shots - Health News
3:17 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

Alleged Perils Of Left-Handedness Don't Always Hold Up

Lefties don't necessarily do everything with their left hand, and the ones who do might not use the right side of their brain for language.
iStockphoto

I recently stumbled upon a description of research out of Yale that suggested there was a link between left-handedness and psychotic disorders like schizophrenia.

Forty percent of those with psychotic disorders are lefties, one of the researchers said. That startled me. Only about 10 percent of people in the general population are left-handed. I'm one of them.

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It's All Politics
3:07 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

A Poorly Worded RNC Tweet On Rosa Parks Backfires

Schoolchildren tour the bus that civil rights icon Rosa Parks made famous when she refused to give up her seat.
Bill Pugliano Getty Images

Originally published on Mon December 2, 2013 6:06 pm

If nothing else, the Republican National Committee has gotten people thinking about Rosa Parks.

Of course, the RNC also gave its political opponents a chance to mock the GOP with its poorly worded tweet Saturday marking the 58th anniversary of the African-American civil rights activist's refusal to give up her bus seat to a white person, an event that sparked the Montgomery bus boycott.

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The Two-Way
2:47 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

N.H. Hospital Lab Tech Gets 39 Years In Hepatitis C Case

Originally published on Mon December 2, 2013 7:58 pm

A former lab technician at a New Hampshire hospital, who prosecutors say infected at least 46 people in four states with hepatitis C, was sentenced to 39 years in prison on Monday.

As NPR reported back in July, David Kwiatkowski crisscrossed the country as a medical technician and landed at New Hampshire's Exeter Hospital.

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The Salt
2:45 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

Sandwich Monday: The Big King From Burger King

Burger King has copied McDonald's groundbreaking proprietary technology known as "stacking food on food."
NPR

Originally published on Wed December 4, 2013 1:36 pm

Fast food, for the most part, is about huge, innovative leaps: the heat lamp, the KFC Double Down, the Wendy's Sentient Bacon Classic. But imitation has its place, too, and Burger King has unveiled the Big King, an unapologetic knockoff of McDonald's Big Mac.

Ian: This is a clear violation of copywrong.

Miles: You have to admit, this is exactly what America would utilize cloning technology for.

Eva: Isn't Big King what everyone called Elvis late in his career?

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The Two-Way
2:16 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

For First Time In Memory, Icelandic Police Shoot And Kill

Police officers in Reykjavik, Iceland, are rarely armed.
Halldor Kolbeins AFP/Getty Images

A police raid Monday on a home in Reykjavík, Iceland, ended with the death of a 59-year-old man who was shot by officers after he reportedly fired a weapon at them.

According to local news outlets, it's believed to be the first time in that nation of more than 315,000 people that someone has been killed by police fire.

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Movie Interviews
1:39 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

Director Alexander Payne On Mining Every Film For Comic Potential

Alexander Payne arrives at the 69th annual Golden Globe Awards in 2012.
Chris Pizzello AP

Originally published on Mon December 2, 2013 2:18 pm

Alexander Payne directed and co-wrote the films Election, About Schmidt, Sideways and The Descendants. He's directed Jack Nicholson and George Clooney in starring roles and has won two Oscars for best adapted screenplay.

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The Two-Way
1:20 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

In About-Face, R.I. Governor Describes Spruce As A Christmas Tree

Rhode Island Gov. Lincoln Chafee speaks with reporters in November of 2012, during the lighting the Statehouse Christmas tree. Chafee announced the ceremony 30 minutes ahead of time to avoid what he called the "chaos" of 2011's lighting, which was protested by people angered by Chafee's decision to call the Statehouse tree a "holiday" tree.
David Klepper AP

It seems Rhode Island Gov. Lincoln Chafee has given up on trying to make a point about the separation of church and state during the holiday season.

In a short statement issued on Monday, Chafee said the 18-foot blue spruce that will be raised inside the State House on Thursday will be called a "Christmas tree."

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