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Latin America
5:51 pm
Sat March 8, 2014

Why Getting 'El Chapo' Wasn't The End Of The Drug War

Originally published on Sat March 8, 2014 8:23 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. I'm Arun Rath.

In Mexico last month, the capture of the world's most wanted drug lord, Joaquin Guzman, was a shot in the arm to the country's war on drug trafficking. But that war is not over, not even close. And nowhere is that more evident than in the western state of Michoacan. Residents there say the local authorities are doing nothing to stop the drug cartels. So they're taking up arms by the thousands to do it themselves.

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World
5:51 pm
Sat March 8, 2014

How Sanctions May Affect Russia's Moves In Ukraine

Originally published on Sat March 8, 2014 8:23 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

One of the options that the United States and the European Union are considering as a way to punish Russia is the use of sanctions. Here to discuss that with me is Matthew Rojansky. He's the director of the Kennan Institute at the Woodrow Wilson Center. Matthew, thanks for being with us.

MATTHEW ROJANSKY: Sure. Happy to be with you.

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Around the Nation
5:34 pm
Sat March 8, 2014

Catching Kayla: Running One Step Ahead Of Multiple Sclerosis

Eighteen-year-old Kayla Montgomery from Mount Tabor High School in Winston-Salem, N.C., was diagnosed with multiple sclerosis three years ago.
Phil Ponder

Originally published on Sat March 8, 2014 8:23 pm

When the starting gun sounds at Mount Tabor High School track meets, senior Kayla Montgomery from Winston-Salem, N.C., takes off.

The 18-year-old runner sets records, wins state titles, and next week, she's headed to nationals in New York.

But when Montgomery runs, her legs go totally numb. She has multiple sclerosis, a disease that causes nerve damage and interference in communication between her brain, spinal cord and legs.

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Religion
5:34 pm
Sat March 8, 2014

A Frat Of Their Own: Muslims Create A New Space On Campus

The brothers of Alpha Lambda Mu come from a variety of backgrounds and religious upbringings. "We meet at this middle ground we call brotherhood," says ALM founder Ali Mahmoud.
Dylan Hollingsworth

Originally published on Sat March 8, 2014 8:23 pm

Toga parties and keg stands have become stereotypes of college fraternities. But Ali Mahmoud had something else in mind when he founded Alpha Lambda Mu, the first social Muslim fraternity in the country.

"I realized that there was this void for Muslims on campus," says Mahmoud, a junior at the University of Texas at Dallas.

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The Two-Way
5:11 pm
Sat March 8, 2014

Daylight Saving Time: Set Your Clocks Ahead Tonight

Custodian Ray Keen inspects a clock face before changing the time on a 100-year-old clock atop the Clay County Courthouse in Kansas Saturday. Americans will set their clocks forward one hour before heading to bed tonight; Daylight Saving Time officially starts Sunday at 2 a.m.
Charlie Riedel AP

Clocks will be set ahead by one hour tonight in much of America, as 2 a.m. will become 3 a.m. early Sunday, March 9. Among the states, only Hawaii and much of Arizona will keep their clocks set to Standard Time. Most of Europe won't begin what it calls "Summer Time" until March 30.

American territories that don't observe Daylight Saving Time include Puerto Rico, American Samoa, Guam and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The Navajo Indian Reservation in Arizona changes its clocks with the rest of the continental U.S.

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The Two-Way
3:34 pm
Sat March 8, 2014

Malaysian Jetliner Has Been Missing For More Than 24 Hours; Search Goes On

Family members arrive at a hotel for loved ones of passengers aboard a missing Malaysia Airlines jet in Beijing Sunday. Search teams across Southeast Asia scrambled on Saturday to find a Malaysia Airlines Boeing 777 with 239 people on board that disappeared from air traffic control screens over waters between Malaysia and Vietnam.
Vincent Thian AP

Originally published on Sun March 9, 2014 8:40 am

This post continues to be updated.

An international search is underway for a Malaysia Airlines passenger jet that's been missing for more than 24 hours. Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 had 227 passengers and 12 crew members aboard when it took off from Kuala Lumpur early Saturday on a flight bound for Beijing.

A regular inspection of the missing Boeing 777-200 found no technical problems 10 days ago, reports China's state-run Xinhua news agency, citing a Malaysia Airlines spokesman.

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The Two-Way
2:53 pm
Sat March 8, 2014

Weeks Later, Epic Spelling Bee Ends In Missouri

Kush Sharma of Kansas City, Mo., is headed to the Scripps National Spelling Bee, after winning a spell-off Saturday. After his win, he posed with students and teachers from his school, the Frontier School of Innovation.
Maria Carter KCUR

It took more than 90 rounds and a delay of two weeks, after judges ran out of words. But Jackson County, Mo., finally has its spelling bee champion, after two stellar spellers broke a tie Saturday.

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The Two-Way
2:40 pm
Sat March 8, 2014

Search For Malaysian Jet Spots Oil Slicks In Waters Off Vietnam

A woman, believed to be the relative of a passenger onboard Malaysia Airlines flight MH370, cries as she talks on her mobile phone at the Beijing Capital International Airport in Beijing.
Kim Kyung-Hoon Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Sat March 8, 2014 4:57 pm

For the latest news, visit our new post about the missing flight.

Vietnamese military planes report seeing two oil slicks off the country's coast that could be a sign of a missing Malaysia Airlines passenger jet Saturday. Officials say the search for the jet continues and that ships are being sent to the location of the sighting.

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Shots - Health News
12:28 pm
Sat March 8, 2014

When Facts Are Scarce, ER Doctor Turns Detective To Decide On Care

Katherine Streeter for NPR

Originally published on Mon March 10, 2014 10:55 am

It's just past midnight on a freezing Saturday night in Washington, D.C.

In the last hour, five ambulances have arrived at the emergency room where I work. A sixth pulls up.

The paramedics wheel out a stretcher carrying a man, 73, strapped to a hard board, a precaution in case his spine is fractured. There's blood around his neck brace and a strong smell of urine.

"We found him by his bed," a paramedic tells me. The patient told the paramedics he slipped. "Reports back pain and some cuts and bruises," one of them adds.

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Interviews
12:05 pm
Sat March 8, 2014

Fresh Air Weekend: WWII Filmmakers, Kevin Young And Solitary Confinement

Maj. Frank Capra sits at his War Department desk in Washington on March 6, 1942. Capra's non-War Department films include It's A Wonderful Life and Mr. Smith Goes To Washington.
AP

Originally published on Thu March 20, 2014 10:10 am

Fresh Air Weekend highlights some of the best interviews and reviews from past weeks, and new program elements specially paced for weekends. Our weekend show emphasizes interviews with writers, filmmakers, actors, and musicians, and often includes excerpts from live in-studio concerts. This week:

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Politics
11:31 am
Sat March 8, 2014

CPAC Is A Siren Call To GOP Presidential Hopefuls

At CPAC this year, even Sen. Rand Paul's cardboard cutout was drawing attention. The Kentucky lawmaker was leading in the straw poll among attendees Friday.
Jim Lo Scalzo EPA/Landov

Originally published on Sat March 8, 2014 2:00 pm

Start with a big ballroom at a resort hotel just outside D.C. Add thousands of conservative activists. Stir in hundreds of political journalists, and you've got an irresistible attraction for any Republican presidential hopeful.

For those with their eye on the Oval Office, it's also an early audition before a key audience.

It's the annual Conservative Political Action Conference — CPAC for short — where there's always talk of the next presidential election. This year as many as 10 possible 2016 candidates were invited to speak during the three-day event.

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Economy
10:52 am
Sat March 8, 2014

What Germans Know Could Help Bridge U.S. Workers' Skill Gap

President Barack Obama promotes job training at General Electric's Waukesha, Wis., gas engine plant in January.
Jeffrey Phelps AP

Originally published on Sat March 8, 2014 11:31 am

Job training programs are failing to turn out enough skilled workers to fill job openings in the U.S., a phenomenon that puzzles some European companies that expand into the U.S.

President Obama freely admits that America needs to improve the way it trains workers. In a speech at a General Electric manufacturing plant in Wisconsin earlier this year, he said, "We gotta move away from what my labor secretary, Tom Perez, calls 'train and pray.' You train workers first and then you hope they get a job."

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The Two-Way
10:29 am
Sat March 8, 2014

Ukraine: Military Standoffs And High Tensions Reported

Pro-Russian marchers (foreground) walk past pro-Ukrainian marchers gathered in Simferopol, capital of Ukraine's Crimea region, Saturday. Several hundred pro-Ukrainian protesters marched peacefully through the city center to a Ukrainian military base that's been blockaded by pro-Russian militants and soldiers.
Sean Gallup Getty Images

Originally published on Sat March 8, 2014 11:52 am

Members of pro-Russian forces and Ukraine's military have engaged in several tense standoffs in the largely autonomous region of Crimea, but they have also avoided violence in what's widely seen as a dangerous and uncertain situation. Diplomats are still working to find a possible solution.

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Parallels
9:35 am
Sat March 8, 2014

Spain's Robin Hood Mayor Fights For 'Communist Utopia'

Radical Mayor Sanchez Gordillo objects to agricultural subsidies for the land elite. At a rally, he embraces a unionista who wanted to start a communal agricultural project on military-owned land.
Jorge Guerrero AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat March 8, 2014 11:31 am

On a sweltering August day in 2012, the mayor of a tiny Spanish town, fed up with the country's economic conditions, did something drastic. It was the height of the economic crisis and most Spanish politicians were away on summer vacation.

With dozens of supporters, Mayor Juan Manuel Sanchez Gordillo of Marinaleda marched into the local supermarket in a neighboring town.

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Europe
7:53 am
Sat March 8, 2014

Tensions Rise In Ukraine Standoff

Originally published on Sat March 8, 2014 11:31 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

To Ukraine now where tensions continue to rise between that country's new government and Russia. Yesterday, pro-Russian soldiers held a standoff at a Ukrainian military base and although it seemed to end without incident, it shows just how quickly the situation has become militarized. We're joined now by Steven Erlanger, reporter for the New York Times, who's in Kiev. Steven, thanks so much for being with us.

STEVEN ERLANGER: Happy to be here.

SIMON: What do we know about this standoff yesterday in Crimea?

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