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4:08 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Deep-Sea Ping May Lead To Malaysian Jet — But Time's Running Out

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 7:29 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish.

Earlier today, Australian authorities said they may have a signal from the missing Malaysian airliner that disappeared a month ago on its way to Beijing. A ship far out in the Indian Ocean has picked up a signal that could be from the missing airliner's black boxes. Investigators need those boxes to determine what happened to Malaysian Air Flight 370.

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News
4:08 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Oscar Pistorius Takes The Stand, Opening With Apology

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 7:29 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

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Sports
4:08 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

In NCAA Finals, Two Recent Champions On Unlikely Rides

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 7:29 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

It's Huskies versus Wildcats as the Men's Division I college basketball season comes to an end tonight. Facing off are two recent champions: the University of Connecticut, who won in 2011, and the University of Kentucky who won in 2012. They've both had improbable rides to tonight's title game.

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U.S.
4:08 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

In New Exhibit, Running Shoes Are Potent Symbol Of Boston Bombing

A pair of running shoes left at the Boston Marathon memorial last year.
Jesse Costa WBUR

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 7:29 pm

In the wake of most tragedies, makeshift memorials fill up with flowers and teddy bears. After the Boston Marathon bombings last April, running shoes became potent symbols in the vast memorial there.

Now, after months in storage at the cavernous City Archives, a group of objects left at the site are in a new exhibition at the Boston Public Library.

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From Our Listeners
4:08 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Letters: Athletic And Academic Demands In College

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 7:29 pm

Melissa Block and Audie Cornish read letters from listeners about the demands made on students and student-athletes in college.

Remembrances
4:08 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Mickey Rooney, All-American Boy For More Than 90 Years, Dies

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 7:29 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Mickey Rooney, who lived a long life on stage and screen, died last night at his home in Los Angeles. He was 93. For a while, the star seem to have it all, but he ended up playing the comeback kid as our film critic Bob Mondello remembers.

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The Salt
2:55 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Disease Detectives Are Solving Fewer Foodborne Illness Cases

The CDC is using DNA sequencing technology to get to the bottom of a listeria outbreak linked to cheese produced at a Delaware factory.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 4:44 pm

Recall, if you will, some of the biggest foodborne illness outbreaks of the past decade. There was the nasty outbreak of listeria from cantaloupe in 2011 that killed 33 people.

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Remembrances
2:06 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Peter Matthiessen On Writing And Zen Buddhism

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 2:57 pm

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

This is FRESH AIR. The publication of Peter Matthiessen's final novel "In Paradise" is coinciding with his obituary. He died Saturday at the age of 86. We're going to listen back to an excerpt of my interview with him. Matthiessen was a naturalist, as well as writer, and his fiction and nonfiction books were often inspired by his travels to remote regions, including mountains and rainforests. His books include "The Snow Leopard," "Men's Lives," "At Play in the Field of the Lords" and "Far Tortuga."

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Religion
1:57 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

If Jesus Never Called Himself God, How Did He Become One?

"If Jesus had not been declared God by his followers, his followers would'™ve remained a sect within Judaism, a small Jewish sect," says historian Bart Ehrman.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue April 8, 2014 6:26 am

When Bart Ehrman was a young Evangelical Christian, he wanted to know how God became a man, but now, as an agnostic and historian of early Christianity, he wants to know how a man became God.

When and why did Jesus' followers start saying "Jesus as God" and what did they mean by that? His new book is called How Jesus Became God: The Exaltation of a Jewish Preacher from Galilee.

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Parallels
1:31 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Ukraine's Winter Of Discontent Gives Way To Spring Of Austerity

Two men play chess in Kiev's Independence Square on Feb. 11. Ukraine's economy is ailing, and the country is facing austerity measures in exchange for an IMF loan. Meanwhile, Russia says it will sharply increase gas prices.
Martin Bureau AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 7:29 pm

After a long winter of protests, Ukrainian activists overthrew their president in February. Now, Ukrainians are staring at the bill they have to pay.

The International Monetary Fund is demanding that Ukraine's new government implement austerity measures in exchange for loans. Russia is threatening to raise Ukraine's heating gas prices by 80 percent. Taken together, this could further squeeze ordinary Ukrainians, some of whom are already getting by with almost nothing.

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The Two-Way
1:28 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Mob In Ukraine Seizes Provincial Building, Declares Independence

Pro-Russian protesters gather next to a barricade as they occupy the regional administration building in Donetsk, Ukraine, on Monday.
Roman Pilipey EPA/Landov

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 1:53 pm

Pro-Russian separatists who seized a provincial building in the eastern Ukrainian city of Donetsk have reportedly declared an independent "people's republic" in a move that echoes events leading to last month's secession of Crimea.

You can see video of the scuffle between police and protesters that led up to the storming of the building here.

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The Two-Way
12:56 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Supreme Court Rejects Gay Wedding Photography Case

Originally published on Tue April 8, 2014 8:48 am

An appeal brought by a photographer who refused to take pictures of gay weddings was turned down by the Supreme Court on Monday morning. The court also refused to hear a challenge to a ban on campaign contributions by corporations, and allowed a district court case over U.S. surveillance to continue.

The photography case was brought by Elane Photography, a New Mexico business run by a husband-and-wife team who said their First Amendment rights allowed them to refuse service to a woman who had sought to hire the company to photograph her commitment ceremony with her partner.

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Music Interviews
12:34 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

LiV Warfield Lets Her 'Unexpected' Voice Out

NPR

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 2:20 pm

Growing up, LiV Warfield's friends and family had no inkling that the track athlete could sing and write songs. But when she moved away from home, the artist inside her came out.

That hidden talent now has her in the spotlight; recently she's been on stage at the Late Show with David Letterman and Late Night with Jimmy Fallon. Her sound has been described as edgy and soulful. And her lyrical prowess has landed her support from music luminaries like Prince.

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Remembrances
12:34 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Chuck Stone Remembered For More Than His Newspaper Columns

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 2:20 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

We'd like to pause now to remember a gifted journalist and activist and journalism professor. Charles Sumner Stone Jr., or Chuck Stone as he was more popularly known, died on Sunday in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. He was 89 years old. After serving as a Tuskegee Airman, Stone dedicated himself to journalism, working at many of the influential black newspapers that were prominent during the civil rights era, such as the Chicago Defender and the New York Age.

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Law
12:34 pm
Mon April 7, 2014

Cocaine Case Puts Spotlight On Fetal Harm Prosecutions

Originally published on Mon April 7, 2014 2:20 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Now we turn to a case that may have implications for how the law treats pregnant women. A Mississippi judge has thrown out a murder charge against Rennie Gibbs. The charge came after Gibbs, then 16 years old, gave birth to a stillborn child. That was in 2006.

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