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Code Switch
7:03 am
Tue April 15, 2014

Sometimes Getting Along Comes Down To How You Say 'Gravy'

There are a surprising number of stock photos of gravy out there. You know, in the event you need one at some point.
iStockPhoto

Originally published on Wed April 16, 2014 9:40 am

In the hectic days before we went live one year ago (hooray!), we somehow missed the news of the passing, at age 91, of John Gumperz — a hugely influential linguist who contributed reams of research on the ways people from different cultures communicate. Had we been paying attention, we could have highlighted a story from Gumperz's studies that serves as a useful demonstration of why code-switching can be both a potent metaphor and a necessary skill.

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Around the Nation
6:56 am
Tue April 15, 2014

Astronauts Will Soon Be Able To Eat Fresh Veggies In Space

Originally published on Tue April 15, 2014 12:05 pm

A plant growth chamber is headed to the International Space Station. It's called Veggie and it sort of looks like a pillow that you can see through, all lit up in pink, with lettuce inside.

Around the Nation
6:51 am
Tue April 15, 2014

'Captain Underpants' 2013's Most Vilified Book

Originally published on Tue April 15, 2014 7:20 am

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Kelly McEvers.

The top spot on the American Library Association's annual list of most challenged books goes to "The Adventures of Captain Underpants," for the second year in a row. The series got the most formal complaints in a list compiled by librarians across the country. The graphic children's novels feature a superhero in his skivvies fighting villains like Dr. Diaper, which, believe it or not, earned the books more complaints than the very adult book "Fifty Shades of Grey."

The Two-Way
6:44 am
Tue April 15, 2014

Did You See It? If Not, Here's The 'Blood Moon'

The "blood moon" as seen from Koreatown, west of Los Angeles, early Tuesday. The next total eclipse of the moon comes on Oct. 8.
Joe Klamar AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue April 15, 2014 9:34 am

There were "whistles, cheers and howls" early Tuesday on the grounds of the Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles as the moon turned red during a total lunar eclipse.

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NPR Story
5:17 am
Tue April 15, 2014

Empathy: How Should We Care About One Another?

Originally published on Tue April 15, 2014 7:20 am

Kelly McEvers talks to Leslie Jamison, author of the new essay collection, The Empathy Exams: Essays. The book takes the writer on a quest to figure out how others feel empathy.

Around the Nation
5:17 am
Tue April 15, 2014

Florida's Freshwater Springs Attract Vacationers

Originally published on Tue April 15, 2014 7:20 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

All right. If I say Florida and Spring Break, you might be conjuring images of beaches, cocktails, theme parks. Well, some of our reporters have been sending suggestions for more off-the-beaten-path destinations and NPR's Greg Allen takes us to Florida and the state's fresh waters springs.

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NPR Story
5:17 am
Tue April 15, 2014

Russia's Move Into Ukraine Turns Allies Into Adversaries

Originally published on Tue April 15, 2014 7:20 am

Russia and Ukraine were the major contributors to the Soviet army. After the collapse of the Soviet Union, Moscow and Kiev continued to cooperate. The recent crisis transformed friend into foe.

NPR Story
5:17 am
Tue April 15, 2014

'Washington Post' And 'Guardian' Win Pulitzer For NSA Stories

Originally published on Tue April 15, 2014 7:20 am

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

The Pulitzer Prizes for Journalism were announced yesterday. The prestigious award was given out for coverage of the Boston Marathon bombing, also stories on coal miners and photos of a terrorist attack in Kenya.

And as NPR's Mandalit del Barco reports, also singled out was coverage of the leaking of top secret government documents.

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Around the Nation
5:17 am
Tue April 15, 2014

Boston To Pay Tribute To Victims Of Last Year's Bombing

Originally published on Tue April 15, 2014 7:20 am

Transcript

KELLY MCEVERS, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Kelly McEvers.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And I'm David Greene, good morning.

One year ago today, the Boston Marathon became more than just one of the world's major sporting events. It became a target. As runners crossed the finish line just before 3:00 in the afternoon, two bombs exploded. Three people were killed and dozens more were wounded. This year the marathon is scheduled for next week. But today there will be a tribute for those whose lives were affected by the attack.

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NPR Story
5:17 am
Tue April 15, 2014

Retailers Want Your Tax Refund

Originally published on Tue April 15, 2014 7:20 am

It's the deadline to file your taxes. And if you're getting a money back, retailers want it. They're offering sales and promotions to separate you from your hard-earned refund.

Shots - Health News
3:25 am
Tue April 15, 2014

Voodoo Dolls Prove It: Hunger Makes Couples Turn On Each Other

Volunteers with lower levels of blood sugar stuck more pins in voodoo dolls of their spouses than people with higher levels.
Courtesy of Brad Bushman

Originally published on Tue April 15, 2014 5:03 pm

A lot of us know what can happen when we get hungry. We get grumpy, irritable and sometimes nasty.

There's even a name for this phenomenon: "Hangry, which is a combination of the words hungry and angry," says psychologist Brad Bushman from Ohio State University.

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Shots - Health News
3:24 am
Tue April 15, 2014

The 7.5 Million Insured Through Obamacare Are Only Part Of The Story

President Obama announced in early April that more than 7 million people had signed up for health insurance through the exchanges.
Win McNamee Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 12:19 pm

Want to know how many people have signed up for private insurance under Obamacare? Like the health care law itself, the answer is complicated.

The Obama administration is tracking the number of plans purchased on HealthCare.gov and on the state exchanges, and this month reported that it had exceeded expectations by signing up 7.5 million people. In addition, federal officials have said that 3 million people have enrolled in Medicaid this year.

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All Tech Considered
3:23 am
Tue April 15, 2014

A Small Tablet Company Brings High-Tech Hopes To Haiti

Haitian artist Richard Josue uses a Surtab tablet.
Marie Arago Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Tue April 15, 2014 10:25 am

Haiti has struggled to rebuild since a devastating earthquake more than four years ago. Most of the population lives on less than $2 a day, and there are few open jobs for the millions of unemployed.

But there's a bright spot: The Western Hemisphere's poorest country is getting into the high-tech race thanks to Surtab, a Port-au-Prince-based company that makes Android tablets.

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The Salt
3:22 am
Tue April 15, 2014

Where's The Whole Grain In Most Of Our Wheat Bread?

The most healthful loaves of bread contain chunks of grain still intact, like the seeded loaf on the right. Whole wheat loaves, like the one in the middle, may contain few whole grains and may be made up mostly of refined flour, like the white bread on the left.
Meg Vogel NPR

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 1:04 pm

We've all heard the advice to eat more whole grains, and cut back on refined starches.

And there's good reason. Compared with a diet heavy on refined grains, like white flour, a diet rich in whole grains — which includes everything from brown rice to steel-cut oats to farro — is linked to lower rates of heart disease, certain cancers and Type 2 diabetes.

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Asia
3:22 am
Tue April 15, 2014

After 25 Years Of Amnesia, Remembering A Forgotten Tiananmen

After People's Armed Police were deployed to clear the square on June 4, pitched battles broke out between police and angry crowds throwing stones.
Courtesy photo

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 5:38 pm

Twenty-five years ago, on April 15, 1989, Chinese students were mourning the death of a reformist leader. But what began as mourning evolved into mass protests demanding democracy. Demonstrators remained in Beijing's Tiananmen Square, day after day, until their protests were brutally suppressed by the Chinese army — on June 4. Hundreds died; to this day, no one knows how many.

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