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The Two-Way
8:11 am
Sun April 27, 2014

U.S. And Philippines Agree On 10-Year Military Plan

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 11:55 am

More American military troops and assets could soon be placed in the Philippines, in a new deal that seems aimed at counterbalancing China's growing influence. The deal is expected to be formalized Monday, as President Obama arrives in Manila on his trip to Asia.

For NPR's Newscast unit, Simone Orendain filed this report from Manila:

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Europe
8:03 am
Sun April 27, 2014

Colosseum Gets A Good 2,000-Year Scouring

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 6:45 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

For two millennia, the Colosseum in Rome has been collecting layers of dirt and grime. Finally, it's getting a top-to-bottom scrubbing. The Roman monument was, of course, the center of entertainment back in the day where people could go to catch a really good show, like a gladiator fight, mock naval battle, or public execution. Millions of tourists visit the amphitheater these days, but it's filthy, covered in black gunk from car pollution, damaged by earthquakes, and stripped of materials over the centuries.

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Iraq
8:03 am
Sun April 27, 2014

Violence In Iraq Mars Runup To Election

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 6:45 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. Iraq is suffering the worst spate of violence that country has seen in many years, some say the worst since the height of the U.S. war in 2008. On Friday, dozens of people were killed at an election rally in Baghdad.

This Wednesday, Iraqis go to the polls in the first parliamentary election since the U.S. pulled combat troops out in 2011. To hear more about the upcoming election, we're joined by Reuters Baghdad Bureau Chief, Ned Parker. Welcome to the program.

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Politics
8:03 am
Sun April 27, 2014

Dole Reflects On A Long Career As He Cruises His Home State

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 6:45 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Senator Bob Dole is doing a lot of appreciating these days. He just wrapped up the first leg of a thank you tour around his home state of Kansas, meeting with longtime friends and supporters who've helped him with throughout his career. And they did turn out to see the native Kansas son, who served as the Republican Majority Leader in the Senate and ran for president in 1996. It is clear Dole still loves working a room. He loves weighing in on the big issues, and he cannot resist a good one-liner.

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National Security
8:03 am
Sun April 27, 2014

Marines In Australia Aimed To Stabilize A Growing Region

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 6:45 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Asia
8:03 am
Sun April 27, 2014

S. Korea Prime Minister Resigns Over Ferry Disaster

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 6:45 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Europe
8:03 am
Sun April 27, 2014

An Independent Scotland Could Falter Economically

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 6:45 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

So that is the argument in favor of Scottish independence. At the same time, many people express deep concerns that leaving the United Kingdom could hurt Scotland. NPR's Ari Shapiro has spent time in Glasgow reporting on the referendum. He joins us now to describe the other side of this debate. Hi, Ari.

ARI SHAPIRO, BYLINE: Hi, Rachel.

MARTIN: So is there some kind of consensus on whether independence would help or hurt Scotland economically?

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Europe
8:03 am
Sun April 27, 2014

Scotland Could Prosper Outside The United Kingdom

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 6:45 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This week marks an important date in the history of the British Isles. In 1707, the Acts of Union were signed, which joined in Scotland and England into a single United Kingdom. And so it has remained for the last 300 years, although, in 1997, the British government gave Scotland its own parliament with certain powers over social policy.

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Europe
8:03 am
Sun April 27, 2014

Crisis Escalates In Eastern Ukraine

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 6:45 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. The crisis in eastern Ukraine is escalating after a group of foreign military observers accused of being spies were detained by pro-Russian separatists. At a press conference today, the detainees said they are in good health and have not been physically mistreated. At the same time, the government in Kiev has stepped up its military operations around separatist dominated towns.

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The Two-Way
7:44 am
Sun April 27, 2014

Crowds Jam St. Peter's For Historic Day Of Four Popes

Pope Francis kisses the relic of Pope John XXIII during the canonization mass.
Vincenzo Pinto AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun April 27, 2014 2:43 pm

Hundreds of thousands of people filled St. Peter's Square and the streets of Rome on Sunday to witness the extraordinary sight of two popes — one reigning and one retired — declaring two of their predecessors as saints.

The ceremony was the first time two pontiffs — John XXIII and John Paul II — were made saints at the same time. The Associated Press says:

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Music Interviews
6:25 pm
Sat April 26, 2014

René Marie On Singing, Sex And The Importance Of Being Eartha

Jazz singer René Marie's latest release is I Wanna Be Evil: With Love to Eartha Kitt.
Janice Yim Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu May 22, 2014 1:54 pm

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The Two-Way
5:57 pm
Sat April 26, 2014

NBA Probes 'Disturbing and Offensive' Comments Attributed To Clippers Owner

An October 2013 photo shows Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling, right, and V. Stiviano, left. A recording released Friday includes racist comments allegedly made by Sterling as the couple argued. The NBA is investigating the claim.
Mark J. Terrill AP

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 6:10 pm

An audio recording that reportedly captures Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling criticizing a woman for publicly "associating with black people" is prompting an NBA investigation into whether Sterling made that and other remarks, including a demand about Magic Johnson: "don't bring him to my games."

"Why are you taking pictures with minorities? Why?" the man asks in the recording, in which a man and woman argue over topics that include photos she posted to Instagram.

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Around the Nation
5:29 pm
Sat April 26, 2014

Fear For Sherpas' Future Grows With Each Climbing Tragedy

Relatives carry a casket bearing the body of a Mount Everest avalanche victim for cremation in Kathmandu on Monday.
Prakash Mathema AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed April 30, 2014 9:42 am

Sherpas have a great reputation as the world's best climbers. "Sherpa" is not some sort of honorific or title; it's the name of an ethnic group — a tiny one. There are around 150,000 of them in Nepal.

While they fight for their lives on treacherous mountain terrain, Sherpas also struggle to keep their community — and its values — alive.

If you are a Sherpa, it's noted right in your name, like Ang Galgen Sherpa, who lives in Queens, N.Y., home to the largest community of Sherpas in the U.S.

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NPR Story
5:29 pm
Sat April 26, 2014

Next Step In New Clemency Initiative: ID Who's Eligible

Originally published on Sat April 26, 2014 6:25 pm

Transcript

ERIC WESTERVELT, HOST:

From the NPR West studios in Culver City, California it's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Eric Westervelt. This coming week, the Federal Bureau of Prisons will send a notice to every inmate in its custody, all 216,000 of them. They're trying to reach the people serving more than 10 years in prison for nonviolent drug crimes. Their message: If you've shown good behavior, had no prior convictions and fulfill a few other criteria, you could receive clemency and go free.

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Author Interviews
5:29 pm
Sat April 26, 2014

How An Army Officer And Diplomat Wrote His Way Through Trauma

Ron Capps talks with refugees in the Kisna Reka refugee camp some 15 miles from Pristina, Kosovo, in 1998. In his role as a U.S. diplomatic monitor, Capps traveled through Kosovo gathering intelligence from refugees and Serb forces about the situation in the region.
Santiago Lyon AP

Originally published on Sat April 26, 2014 6:25 pm

In five wars over 10 years, Ron Capps shifted back and forth between being a U.S. Army officer and a State Department foreign service officer in some of the world's deadliest places.

In Afghanistan, Iraq and elsewhere, he served as a senior military intelligence officer. In wartime Kosovo, Darfur and Rwanda, he worked as a diplomat out in the field, documenting violence and war. As he writes in his new memoir, all the while he was almost daily "in the midst of murder, rape, the burning of villages, crimes against humanity, war crimes, ethnic cleaning or genocide."

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