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The Two-Way
3:35 pm
Wed May 28, 2014

55 Convicted In Public Trial In China's Northwest

Trucks packed with criminals and suspects at a mass sentencing rally at a stadium in Yili, in Xinjiang province, on Tuesday.
China Stringer Network Reuters/Landov

In a mass trial before thousands of onlookers at a sports stadium, authorities in China's northwestern Xinjiang province convicted and sentenced 55 people on charges of terrorism, separatism and murder, state media report.

The scene, reminiscent of the communist Cultural Revolution of the 1960s and '70s, took place before a crowd of 7,000 spectators. All of the defendants appeared to be from the region's Muslim Uighur community, the BBC says.

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The Two-Way
2:50 pm
Wed May 28, 2014

Report Finds Evidence Of Secret Wait Lists At VA Hospital

The Department of Veterans Affairs in Phoenix, where the VA's inspector general says numerous problems with scheduling practices were uncovered.
Matt York AP

Originally published on Thu May 29, 2014 2:12 pm

The inspector general of the Department of Veterans Affairs has affirmed that some 1,700 patients at the Phoenix VA hospital were put on unofficial wait lists and subjected to treatment delays of up to 115 days.

In an interim report released Wednesday, the inspector general's office reported it had "substantiated that significant delays in access to care negatively impacted the quality of care" at Phoenix HCS.

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NPR Story
2:45 pm
Wed May 28, 2014

Highlights From The Cannes Film Festival

Transcript

TERRY GROSS, HOST:

This is FRESH AIR. I'm Terry Gross. The Cannes Film Festival, the most important international film festival, concluded this past weekend. Getting an award at Cannes gives a new film the kind of pedigree that helps ensure good international distribution. FRESH AIR's critic-at-large, John Powers, who is also the film critic for Vogue, reported on the festival, as he's done many years.

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Author Interviews
2:45 pm
Wed May 28, 2014

'Fresh Air' Remembers Poet And Memoirist Maya Angelou

Maya Angelou's most recent autobiography, Mom & Me & Mom, looked back on her complicated relationship with her mother.
Doug Mills AP

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 3:10 pm

In her memoirs, Maya Angelou explored how race and gender affected her life. Her first memoir, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, was published in 1969 and describes growing up in the segregated South. It includes the story of how, as a child, Angelou was raped by her mother's boyfriend. After the rape, she withdrew into herself and went through a long period of not speaking.

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The Two-Way
1:18 pm
Wed May 28, 2014

Rumors Of An Intergalactic Explosion Are Greatly Exaggerated

Astronomers thought they saw a big explosion in the nearby Andromeda galaxy.
GALEX, JPL-Caltech/ NASA

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 6:17 pm

Tuesday afternoon, astronomers thought they saw a powerful explosion in the nearby Andromeda galaxy.

The Internet went wild with speculation about what it could be: Had two superdense neutron stars collided? Did a supermassive star explode?

"When I got up this morning and turned on my phone, I had a lot of emails and my Twitter feed was burning," says Phil Evans, an astronomer at the University of Leicester in Britain.

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Shots - Health News
1:13 pm
Wed May 28, 2014

American Teens Are Becoming Even Wimpier Than Before

Pickup basketball may be losing out to computer games.
johnrf2/iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu May 29, 2014 2:50 pm

If you think that teenagers are becoming weaklings, you're right.

Less than half of youths ages 12 to 15 are even close to being aerobically fit, according to data released Wednesday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

That's down from 52 percent of youths in 1999 to 2000, the last time this survey was conducted. It measures "adequate" levels of cardiorespiratory fitness, which children need not only for sports but for good health.

And that was true regardless of a child's race and family income.

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The Salt
1:06 pm
Wed May 28, 2014

Big Breweries Move Into Small Beer Town — And Business Is Hopping

John Stuart (left) of Green Man Brewery grabs a Tater Ridge mash sample from Sierra Nevada's Scott Jennings (center) at the Sierra Nevada brewery in Mills River, N.C.
Courtesy of Sierra Nevada Brewing Co.

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 3:53 pm

With more breweries per capita than any U.S. city, Asheville, N.C., has become a sort of Napa Valley of beer.

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It's All Politics
12:55 pm
Wed May 28, 2014

Hard Sell For 'Hard Choices' Says Hillary's Running In 2016

Publisher Simon & Schuster says the initial printing of Hillary Clinton's soon-to-be-released memoir, Hard Choices, has already sold out.
Cliff Owen AP

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 2:19 pm

As subtle as a bugle call, the marketing effort now underway for Hillary Clinton's new book is the clearest indication to date that she is in fact running for president in 2016.

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Krulwich Wonders...
12:29 pm
Wed May 28, 2014

A Little Bird Either Learns Its Name Or Dies

Robert Krulwich NPR

I've been wondering lately, do animals invent names? As in names for themselves? Names for each other? I've always thought that what we do when we call ourselves "Ralph" or "Laura" is unique, something exclusively human. But it turns out that's wrong. Other animals have name-like calls that they use much like we do. I've posted about this before (regarding horses, dolphins and little parakeets) ...

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The Two-Way
12:12 pm
Wed May 28, 2014

To Win, Wear Red: Physicist Hawking Advises England's World Cup Squad

Physicist Stephen Hawking has revealed "England's World Cup Success Formula," which he says was derived by using general logistic regression analysis.
YouTube

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 12:52 pm

After a lifetime contemplating the mysteries of the universe, famed physicist Stephen Hawking is now considering a more mundane question: How can England win the World Cup?

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Can I Just Tell You?
12:12 pm
Wed May 28, 2014

Choosing To Stay When 'Tell Me More' Ends

Tell Me More staff, past and present.
Ammad Omar NPR

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 12:24 pm

Since this is a day when we are mourning the loss of the consummate story teller Maya Angelou, I will start by telling you a story. You might remember that before I came to NPR, I worked at ABC News, for the most part for the late night program Nightline, anchored by Ted Koppel. And I was thinking about a story he sent me to cover about a high ranking African-American police officer from Miami who got into an altercation with a white cop from Orlando. This was after the Orlando officer pulled the Miami officer over, who was on his way to his vacation house.

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Remembrances
12:12 pm
Wed May 28, 2014

Nikki Giovanni Honors Her Late Friend Maya Angelou

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 12:24 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. We'd like to pay tribute now to the legendary author and poet Maya Angelou. She died this morning at the age of 86. Here is a clip of her reading part of one of her most beloved poems "Phenomenal Woman."

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

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Race
12:12 pm
Wed May 28, 2014

What Fueled UCSB Shooter's Rage Against Women?

Originally published on Fri May 30, 2014 7:55 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. Later this hour we will hear tributes and reflections about the late Maya Angelou, the beloved poet - writer who died this morning at the age of 86. But first, we return to this very disturbing story out of Santa Barbara - the shooting of a number of people this weekend. We want to get a different perspective that you might not have heard, but we think you will want to.

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The Two-Way
11:33 am
Wed May 28, 2014

Obama Emphasizes Importance Of Alliances In Foreign Policy Address

President Obama arrives to deliver the commencement address to the Military Academy at West Point on Wednesday. In a broad defense of his foreign policy, the president declared that the U.S. remains the world's most indispensable nation, even after a "long season of war," but he underscored that not every global problem has a military solution.
Susan Walsh AP

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 2:37 pm

President Obama sought to recast if not reboot his overall approach to foreign policy with his graduation address at West Point on Wednesday.

In essence answering critics who have complained that his administration has lacked forceful responses to challenges in places such as Syria, Iran, Ukraine and Nigeria, Obama emphasized that "America must always lead on the world stage."

But he underscored that not every global problem has a military solution.

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The Two-Way
11:33 am
Wed May 28, 2014

Book News: Amazon Defends Tough Negotiating Tactics

Amazon is "not optimistic that this will be resolved soon," speaking about its dispute with the publisher Hachette. The retailer is not allowing customers to pre-order Hachette's books.
Philippe Merle AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 1:17 pm

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

Note: This post was written before news of writer Maya Angelou's death emerged. Annalisa will be away until early next week, but feel free to send her your bookish thoughts and questions on Twitter at @annalisa_quinn.

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