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The Two-Way
4:06 pm
Tue May 27, 2014

Peat Bog The Size Of England Discovered In Congo Republic

A massive peat bog the size England has been found in West Africa's Republic of Congo.

The previously undiscovered bog is thought to reach nearly 23 feet beneath the ground and contain billions of tons of peat –- ancient, partially decayed vegetation. It could cover an area 40,000 to 80,000 square miles, scientists believe in the Congo Republic, also referred to as Congo-Brazzaville.

The BBC says:

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The Salt
3:58 pm
Tue May 27, 2014

Paleo For Dogs? Vets Say Trendy Diet Could Make Humans Sick

Kari Neumeyer feeds her dogs, Leo and Mia, a raw food diet supplemented by kibble, which she says is more natural than commercial dog food.
Rob Eis/Courtesy of Kari Neumeyer

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 8:23 am

Yesterday we told you about the people who are skipping the pet food aisle to whip up batches of homemade goodness for Fido in their own kitchens.

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Parallels
3:15 pm
Tue May 27, 2014

Smugglers Thrive On Syria's Chaos, Looting Cultural Treasures

A Syrian policeman patrols the ancient oasis city of Palmyra in March. Many Syrian antiquities have been looted and smuggled out of the country during the past three years of civil war.
Joseph Eid AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 27, 2014 8:16 pm

Smuggling is a way of life in Lebanon's Bekaa Valley, just over the border from Syria. Driving along it, you see pale smugglers' trails snaking through mountain passes, and the guys who run touristy little antiques stores here say they can get you anything.

"Everything that have traditions and everything found in old houses," says Reda Ismail, who runs one of the many stores in the valley. Dealers say most things here are smuggled from Syria, and Ismail thinks these days it's more prevalent.

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Common Core
3:08 pm
Tue May 27, 2014

Will New Florida Standards Leave Time For Creative Writing?

Laurie Langford, a second grade teacher at West Defuniak Elementary, helps two students look for evidence in a reading passage about public sector jobs.

Originally published on Mon May 26, 2014 8:53 am

Laurie Langford, a second grade teacher at West Defuniak Elementary, helps two students look for evidence in a reading passage about public sector jobs.
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Music
2:54 pm
Tue May 27, 2014

The Bronze Buckaroo Rides Off Into The Sunset

The smooth baritone Herb Jeffries, who recorded the 1940 hit "Flamingo" with the Duke Ellington orchestra, was also the first black singing cowboy on the silver screen, nicknamed the Bronze Buckaroo. Herb Jeffries died Sunday at age of about 100. His exact age is uncertain. Terry Gross spoke with Herb Jeffries in 1995.

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Commentary
2:54 pm
Tue May 27, 2014

150 Years After Marx, 'Capital' Still Can't Shake Loose Of 'Das Kapital'

A lot of things had to come together to turn Thomas Piketty's controversial Capital in the Twenty-First Century into the tome of the season. There's its timeliness, its surprising accessibility and the audacity of its thesis, that capitalism inevitably leads to greater concentrations of wealth at the very top.

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Books
2:54 pm
Tue May 27, 2014

China Turns To Africa For Resources, Jobs And Future Customers

Over the next few years China will build a multi-billion dollar railway linking the Kenyan port of Mombasa to Nairobi (shown here), based on an agreement signed earlier this month by East African and Chinese officials. It's one of many examples of China's increasing economic engagement with African countries.
Tony Karumba AFP/Getty Images

China's economic engagement in Africa can be measured in dollars — for instance, the $71 million airport expansion contract in Mali, funded by American foreign aid, that went to a Chinese construction firm.

More remarkably, it can be measured in people: More than a million Chinese citizens have permanently moved to Africa, buying land, starting businesses and settling among local populations.

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Parallels
2:38 pm
Tue May 27, 2014

World's Richest People Meet, Muse On How To Spread The Wealth

Prince Charles talks to Lynn Forester de Rothschild (left), organizer of the Conference on Inclusive Capitalism, and Christine Lagarde, head of the International Monetary Fund, before Tuesday's conference. The 250 corporate and financial leaders who attended control some $30 trillion, about a third of the world's investable assets.
WPA Pool Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 27, 2014 8:17 pm

Talk of economic mobility and the wealth gap is hardly new. From the Occupy movement to President Obama's re-election campaign, income inequality has been in the spotlight for years.

Even so, the "inclusive capitalism" conference in London on Tuesday broke new ground. Not because of the conversation, but because of the people having it.

The 250 people from around the world invited to attend this one-day conference do not represent "the 99 percent," or even the 1 percent. It's more like a tiny fraction of the 1 percent.

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The Two-Way
2:36 pm
Tue May 27, 2014

Bill Murray Offers Bachelor Party Advice On Love And Life

Originally published on Tue May 27, 2014 5:45 pm

Bill Murray dropped by a bachelor party in South Carolina this past weekend and offered up some advice.

"You know how funerals are not for the dead, they're for the living?" the comic actor says in a video posted by Deadspin. "Bachelor parties are not for the groom; they're for the unmarried."

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The Two-Way
2:14 pm
Tue May 27, 2014

Pakistani Woman Stoned To Death By Family Outside Courtroom

Mohammad Iqbal, husband of Farzana, sits in an ambulance next to the body of his pregnant wife, who was stoned to death by her own family in Lahore, Pakistan, on Tuesday.
K.M. Chaudary AP

Originally published on Tue May 27, 2014 3:26 pm

A 25-year-old pregnant woman has been stoned to death by her relatives outside a courtroom in Lahore, Pakistan — a so-called honor killing meant to punish her for marrying against her family's will.

Farzana Iqbal was preparing to testify in defense of her husband, Mohammad Iqbal, whom her father had accused of kidnapping the young woman. The father had insisted instead that she marry her cousin.

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Shots - Health News
1:36 pm
Tue May 27, 2014

When Older People Walk Now, They Stay Independent Later

Walking: so simple, yet difficult for many people as they age.
Justin Horrocks iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 11:19 am

Millions of older people have trouble walking a quarter of a mile, which puts them at high risk of losing their mobility, being hospitalized or dying.

But it's hard to get people who are already sedentary to become more active and stay that way.

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The Two-Way
1:27 pm
Tue May 27, 2014

Former LulzSec Hacker Turned Informant Avoids Further Jail Time

Hector Xavier Monsegur arrives at court in New York for a sentencing hearing on Tuesday.
Seth Wenig AP

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 2:28 pm

Avoiding further jail time, Hector Xavier Monsegur — a hacktivist legend — walked out of a federal court house in Manhattan on Tuesday.

The AP reports that U.S. District Judge Loretta Preska said Monsegur's cooperation helped disrupt hundreds of cyber attacks and helped disrupt the hacker activist group Anonymous and essentially marked the end of LulzSec.

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The Two-Way
1:21 pm
Tue May 27, 2014

Median CEO Pay Tops $10 Million For The First Time

Are you getting rich off the rising stock market? America's CEOs are.

Median compensation for the chief executive of a Standard & Poor's 500 company was $10.8 million last year, according to a study by The Associated Press.

That represents an 8.8 percent increase over 2012 and marks the first time that median compensation crossed the eight-figure mark.

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The Two-Way
11:44 am
Tue May 27, 2014

Florida's IQ Limit For Death Penalty Isn't Constitutional, Supreme Court Says

Florida death row inmate Freddie Lee Hall challenged the state's use of an IQ cutoff to determine mental disability. The Supreme Court sided with him on Tuesday, saying Florida's law doesn't take standard errors of measurement into account.
Florida Department of Corrections/AP

Originally published on Tue May 27, 2014 4:53 pm

A Florida law that sets an IQ test score of 70 as a minimum in determining who's eligible for the death penalty is unconstitutional, the Supreme Court says. In a reversal of a state court's decision, the justices say Florida's rule ignores norms in the psychiatric profession. The opinion also cites the Eighth Amendment, which bars cruel and unusual punishment.

"Florida set a hard-line rule that the death penalty could not be imposed on convicted felons whose IQ is 70 or below," NPR's Washington desk says in its summary of the case.

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Parenting
11:44 am
Tue May 27, 2014

New York City's First Lady A Bad Mom ... Or Just An Honest One?

Originally published on Tue May 27, 2014 12:32 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. They say it takes a village to raise a child, but maybe you just need a few moms and dads in your corner. Every week we check in with a diverse group of parents for their common sense and savvy advice.

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