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The Two-Way
1:07 pm
Sun June 1, 2014

A Sisyphean Task Begins As 'Forget' Requests Roll Into Google

Following a European court ruling, Google is taking requests to delete personal information. At one point on Friday, the search engine was getting more than 20 requests a minute.
Jens Meyer AP

Google opened an online form this week allowing European users to request that information about their lives be deleted from the search engine.

In the first 24 hours, more than 12,000 people asked to be "forgotten."

The company was responding to a European Court of Justice ruling in May that said citizens have the right to request certain information be removed, if, for instance, the information is inaccurate or outdated.

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The Two-Way
12:59 pm
Sun June 1, 2014

In The Midst Of A Historic Lull, Atlantic Hurricane Season Kicks Off

Barbara Cassidy stands in front of her Davie, Fla., mobile home one month after Hurricane Wilma destroyed her home in 2005. Wilma was the last major storm to make landfall in the U.S.
J. Pat Carter AP

Originally published on Sun June 1, 2014 1:57 pm

The 2014 Atlantic hurricane season is now officially upon us. And it comes in the midst of a historic lull.

Time explains that it's been 3,142 days since a Category 3 hurricane or stronger made landfall in the United States. The last one was Hurricane Wilma, which at its peak had winds of 185 mph and made landfall in Florida in 2005.

"That's an unprecedented streak, going back to 1900β€”the longest drought before the current one was nearly 1,000 days shorter," Time goes on.

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Middle East
12:47 pm
Sun June 1, 2014

What Elections? Syrian Opposition Rejects Assad's Expected Win

A mock election poster depicts Syrian President Bashar Assad as Mafia boss Don Corleone, with token candidates kissing his hand.
Ahmed Jalal/Kafranbel Syrian Revolution

Originally published on Sun June 1, 2014 2:02 pm

Tuesday's elections in Syria are sure to result in another term for President Bashar Assad, even as the international community says his regime is responsible for the deaths of tens of thousands of civilians.

The opposition is railing against his inevitable triumph.

At a demonstration Friday by some of the 1 million Syrians who have fled into neighboring Lebanon, the view on the election was clear.

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The Two-Way
9:56 am
Sun June 1, 2014

Co-Owner Of 'Philadelphia Inquirer' Among 7 Killed In Plane Crash

Businessman Lewis Katz was among the seven people killed in a plane crash in Massachusetts on Saturday.
Matt Rourke AP

Originally published on Sun June 1, 2014 12:57 pm

The co-owner of the Philadelphia Inquirer was among seven people killed in a plane crash on Saturday in Massachusetts.

Inquirer editor Bill Marimow told his newspaper that 72-year-old Lewis Katz was on board the Gulfstream IV private jet headed for Atlantic City.

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The Two-Way
7:48 am
Sun June 1, 2014

Hagel Defends Trade of Guantanamo Prisoners For U.S. Soldier

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel, center, speaks to members of the media aboard a U.S. military aircraft on Sunday. Hagel said quick action was necessary to save Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl's life, leaving no time to disclose the administration's plans to Congress.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 7:35 am

A day after Taliban officials handed him over to a group of American Special Forces, Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl is now receiving a medical evaluation at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center in Germany.

That's according to Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel, who spoke to reporters during a pre-scheduled trip to Bagram Air Field in Afghanistan.

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Research News
7:46 am
Sun June 1, 2014

Creativity, Dirty Eggs And Vocal Fry: The Week In Science

Originally published on Sun June 1, 2014 2:44 pm

Science is always churning out weird, funny and fascinating findings. What did we miss this week? NPR's Rachel Martin checks in with science writer Rose Eveleth.

National Security
7:46 am
Sun June 1, 2014

Did Suicide Bomber Catch The 'Virus Of Jihadism' In Florida?

Originally published on Sun June 1, 2014 2:42 pm

A U.S. citizen who blew himself up in a suicide attack in Syria last week grew up in Florida, according to U.S. officials. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to former FBI Intelligence adviser Philip Mudd.

Environment
7:46 am
Sun June 1, 2014

Obama To Wield Executive Power To Limit Carbon Emissions

Originally published on Sun June 1, 2014 12:47 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

As we just heard, tomorrow, the Environmental Protection Agency will announce new regulations aimed at cutting carbon pollution. To hear more about that, we're joined by Michael Oppenheimer. He's a professor of geosciences and international affairs at Princeton University. These regulations are the president's most ambitious plan yet to combat climate change. Professor Oppenheimer, from your vantage point, how significant is this announcement?

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Europe
7:46 am
Sun June 1, 2014

Obama's Europe Trip To Mark Poland, D-Day Anniversaries

Originally published on Sun June 1, 2014 12:47 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. President Obama wrapped up a big week full of highs and lows - from his foreign policy speech at West Point to the resignation of VA secretary Eric Shinseki, and the news that the sole American POW from the Afghan war has been released.

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Europe
7:46 am
Sun June 1, 2014

Le Pen Victory In France Presents A Paradox For Hollande

Originally published on Sun June 1, 2014 12:47 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Far-right political parties won big in European parliamentary elections in many countries last weekend. Their victory was particularly painful in France, a founding member of the European Union, and has deepened the sense of crisis for the very unpopular Socialist president, Francois Hollande. NPR's Eleanor Beardsley reports from Paris.

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Education
7:46 am
Sun June 1, 2014

New Orleans Closes Its Last Traditional Schools

Originally published on Sun June 1, 2014 2:43 pm

Last week, the New Orleans school district became the first all-charter district in the country. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Sarah Carr, a reporter who's been following the city's changing schools.

Around the Nation
7:46 am
Sun June 1, 2014

POW's Hometown Worked For Years To Bring Him Home

Originally published on Sun June 1, 2014 2:52 pm

Stefanie O'Neill has been leading the "Bring Bowe Back" campaign in Hailey, Idaho. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to O'Neill about the hometown reaction to POW Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl's release.

Afghanistan
7:46 am
Sun June 1, 2014

Taliban Release U.S. Soldier Taken Hostage In 2009

Originally published on Sun June 1, 2014 12:47 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is a WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. This morning, the only American POW of the Afghan War is a free man. Army sergeant Bowe Bergdahl had spent almost five years held captive by the Taliban. President Obama announced the news of his release in an address yesterday at the White House. Standing beside the president, Bergdahl's parents.

(SOUNDBITE OF SPEECH)

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Parallels
7:46 am
Sun June 1, 2014

For Many Of China's Youth, June 4 May As Well Be Just Another Day

A Chinese man who became known as "Tank Man" stands alone to block a line of tanks heading east on Beijing's Changan Avenue just outside Tiananmen Square on June 5, 1989. It's an iconic image known around the world --€” except in China.
Jeff Widener AP

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 10:14 am

They peered at the photo blankly, leaning to take in the details.

"Is it from South Korea?" asked a student studying for a doctorate in marketing, with no flicker of recognition.

"Is it Kosovo?" a young astronomy major guessed.

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Parallels
5:06 am
Sun June 1, 2014

Panama's Canal Divides A Country Into Haves And Have-Nots

Panama has seen dramatic growth since taking over the Panama Canal in 2000 from the U.S. That prosperity can be seen in Panama City's rapidly developing skyline. However, many have not yet seen the benefits, and the country still suffers from widespread poverty.
Arnulfo Franco AP

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 1:00 pm

Jorge Quijano has one of the coolest office views in the Americas: the Pacific port entrance to the Panama Canal. The panoramic vista seems to help Quijano, who heads the Panama Canal Authority, see the bigger picture.

On the one hand, Quijano understands why Panama has run the canal so effectively since the United States handed it over in 2000.

"When the United States built the canal, it was treated like a noncommercial utility, like a water filtration plant," Quijano said in an interview at his Panama City headquarters. "We're running it as a business."

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