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3:09 pm
Mon June 2, 2014

John Fullbright's Uneven 'Songs' Finds A Way To Fascinate

John Fullbright's new album is called Songs.
Courtesy of the artist

John Fullbright's Songs is the most interestingly uneven album I've heard in a while. The work of a smart young man, it's also the work of a self-conscious young man who's prone to mistaking articulate melancholy for wisdom. Fullbright's debut album contained bold melodies and told stories about daydreamers and offbeat people. On Songs, Fullbright opts for pure mood-setting, sounding morose in an attempt to signal subtle passion, but that's not really how it plays out.

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NPR Ed
3:03 pm
Mon June 2, 2014

Reaching Immigrant Children By Helping Their Parents

There are 96 languages spoken across the Los Angeles Unified School District; 49 percent of California's young children have an immigrant parent.
Julie Flickr

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 5:00 pm

At our neighborhood playground in Brooklyn, you can hear kids shouting and playing in Russian, Spanish, Yiddish, Tagalog, French, Hebrew, Vietnamese, Cantonese and Polish. This kind of giddy cacophony has been par for the course in New York City for 150 years, but it's becoming more and more common across the country.

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Parallels
2:11 pm
Mon June 2, 2014

In Bowe Bergdahl's Release, As Many Questions As Answers

A sign supporting Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl is seen in Hailey, Idaho, on Sunday. Bergdahl, the sole American prisoner of war held in Afghanistan, was flown to a U.S. military hospital in Germany on Sunday after being freed in a swap deal for five Taliban militants who were released from the Guantanamo Bay prison in Cuba.
Patrick Sweeney Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Tue June 3, 2014 9:27 am

The release of Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl in exchange for five senior members of the Taliban has been both welcomed as well as criticized.

Here's a look at why the release of a prisoner of war, usually a cause for unalloyed celebration, is proving so divisive.

Who is Bowe Bergdahl?

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The Two-Way
1:38 pm
Mon June 2, 2014

91-Year-Old Woman Breaks Marathon Record

Harriette Thompson meets the press at the finish line of the Suja Rock 'n' Roll San Diego Marathon on Sunday
Jerod Harris Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 3:14 pm

It took Harriette Thompson more than seven hours to run a marathon Sunday in San Diego. But that was awfully good, considering she's 91 and recovering from cancer.

In fact, she beat the previous record for women 90 and up by two hours and 45 minutes. She also became the second-oldest woman to complete a marathon in U.S. history, according to the running site Competitor.com.

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The Two-Way
1:28 pm
Mon June 2, 2014

Jacques Cousteau's Grandson Plans To Spend A Month Underwater

Fabien Cousteau sits inside Aquarius Reef Base in 2012. If he is able to remain under water for 31 days, he will have lasted one day longer than his grandfather, Jacques Cousteau.
Mark Widick AP

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 2:43 pm

Fabien Cousteau has been following in his grandfather Jacques Cousteau's flipper-steps for years — scuba diving around the world and making underwater documentaries of his own. Now he's seeking to break the elder oceanographer's record for the longest period of time spent underwater.

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The Salt
1:17 pm
Mon June 2, 2014

Native Americans Have Superfoods Right Under Their Feet

Twigs and leaves from chokecherries are high in vitamin K, fiber and calcium.
pverdonk iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 2:42 pm

On American Indian reservations, the traditional diet of wild plants and game for food is increasingly being replaced with a far less healthful diet of predominantly high-carb, high-sugar foods.

Along the way, obesity and type 2 diabetes rates have soared. At nearly 16 percent, American Indians and Alaska Natives have the highest prevalence of diabetes among all U.S. racial and ethnic groups, according to the American Diabetes Association.

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Shots - Health News
12:58 pm
Mon June 2, 2014

Are Pre-Existing Condition Bans For Health Insurance Still With Us?

Cigna's letter to Julie Rovner saying she had no proof of past coverage, so limitations based on pre-existing conditions could apply. (Highlights added.)
Julie Rovner for NPR

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 1:50 pm

"Welcome to Cigna," said the letter, dated May 16, on behalf of my new employer, the Kaiser Family Foundation. The letter also said the insurer was placing me on a one-year waiting period for any pre-existing conditions.

Seriously? Wasn't the health law supposed to end that?

"We have reviewed the evidence of prior creditable coverage provided by you and/or your prior carrier and have determined that you have 0 days of creditable coverage," the letter said.

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The Two-Way
12:54 pm
Mon June 2, 2014

Mailman Accused Of Stealing 20,000 Pieces Of Mail

A postman has been accused of stealing credit cards, Netflix movies and other items. The U.S. Postal Service says a search of Jeffrey L. Shipley's home found his apartment had bags of mail in it.
Ivana Starcevic iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 2:56 pm

For some folks in Catonsville, Md., it must have seemed like their mail was disappearing into a black hole. Passports, money orders and Mother's Day cards are among the items a U.S. Postal Service worker is accused of stealing in the town near Baltimore.

Officials say mail carrier Jeffrey L. Shipley stole 20,000 items during a postal career that began in 1993.

From The Baltimore Sun:

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Behind Closed Doors
11:48 am
Mon June 2, 2014

'Drunk Mom' Tackles New Motherhood And Old Addictions

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 12:35 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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U.S.
11:48 am
Mon June 2, 2014

'Harvest Of Shame': Farm Workers Struggle With Poverty 50 Years On

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 12:35 pm

The documentary Harvest of Shame was revolutionary in its raw portrayal of poverty amongst migrant farm workers. NPR's Elizabeth Blair discusses the film's legacy and the state of migrant work today.

Technology
11:48 am
Mon June 2, 2014

Google 'Courageous' For Admitting Diversity Problem, So What Now?

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 12:35 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. I'm Michel Martin. We want to turn to a topic we've discussed quite a bit over the past few months - diversity in the tech industry. Just recently, one of the biggest names in tech, Google, has started talking openly for the first time about diversity.

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Around the Nation
11:48 am
Mon June 2, 2014

Should Getting High Stop You From Getting Hired?

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 12:35 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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The Two-Way
11:27 am
Mon June 2, 2014

'Times' Reporter Must Testify About Source, Court Decides

The Supreme Court announced on Monday that it would refuse to hear an appeal from New York Times reporter James Risen, in a case about protecting anonymous sources.
Ramin Talaie Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 2:49 pm

A New York Times reporter may have to testify about an anonymous source. The Supreme Court announced on Monday that it would refuse to hear an appeal from James Risen, the reporter in the case.

The court in effect upheld a decision from the 4th Circuit Court of Appeals that Risen has to testify about the source for a chapter in his 2006 book, State of War.

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The Two-Way
11:15 am
Mon June 2, 2014

L.A. Kings Earn Shot At Stanley Cup With Win Over Chicago Blackhawks

Jarret Stoll (No. 28) of the Los Angeles Kings celebrates his team's game-winning goal in Game 7 of the Western Conference Finals. Kings defenseman Alec Martinez scored in overtime with a shot that deflected off the Chicago Blackhawks' Nick Leddy (left).
Tasos Katopodis Getty Images

The L.A. Kings beat the Chicago Blackhawks 5-4 on Sunday, advancing to the Stanley Cup Final in a dramatic Game 7 overtime win.

The Blackhawks, the defending Stanley Cup champions, scored the first two goals of the game and led through the first period. The Kings tied the score at 3-3 partway through the second period, but Chicago took the lead again a few minutes before the second intermission.

The Kings caught back up at 7:17 of the third period. Missed shots and frantic saves carried the game into overtime.

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The Two-Way
10:56 am
Mon June 2, 2014

Chemical Weapons Law Doesn't Apply To Jilted Lover, Supreme Court Rules

The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that an international treaty wasn't meant to be invoked in an assault case in Pennsylvania.
Jonathan Ernst Reuters/Landov

Federal laws that were meant to prevent the international use of chemical weapons can't be applied to a woman who tried to poison her husband's mistress, the Supreme Court has ruled. Carol Anne Bond had smeared toxic chemicals in the hopes that the other woman would develop a rash.

The Supreme Court ruled that the federal law shouldn't have been used to prosecute Bond, as her actions were forbidden under state or local laws. The opinion was written by Chief Justice John Roberts.

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