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Around the Nation
9:35 am
Sat May 31, 2014

Abortion Services Return To Town Where George Tiller Was Murdered

Executive Director Julie Burkhart stands next to a portrait of Dr. George Tiller at the South Wind Women's Center in Wichita, Kan. Burkhart runs the center, which recently opened in the same building where Tiller's clinic once operated.
Charlie Riedel AP

Originally published on Sun June 1, 2014 1:24 pm

Five years ago, Dr. George Tiller was shot and killed at the Wichita, Kans., church where he was an usher. Tiller was widely known for performing abortions in late pregnancy and had become a target for protests.

It was the morning of May 31, 2009, and fellow usher Gary Hoepner remembers they had finished their greeting duties and had walked out into the waiting area to get a doughnut.

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The Two-Way
8:54 am
Sat May 31, 2014

Border Patrol Releases New Use-Of-Force Guidelines, Critical Report

A Border Patrol agent looks to the north near where the border wall ends as it separates Tijuana, Mexico, (left) and San Diego.
Gregory Bull AP

Originally published on Sat May 31, 2014 12:00 pm

After first balking at the suggestion, U.S. Customs and Border Protection has now released a critical report of how its officers use deadly force in the case of rock-throwers and moving vehicles. The agency also unveiled an updated handbook that incorporates many of the recommendations issued by the law-enforcement panel.

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Asia
7:46 am
Sat May 31, 2014

South Korea Repaves For A 'Woman-Friendly Seoul'

Originally published on Sat May 31, 2014 11:38 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Seoul, South Korea's making some changes to its urban landscape. The mayor's office says the women-friendly Seoul campaign will make the city more comfortable for women. They say a lot of urban design focused on men when they were the sole workers in a family and that's changed. So, they're installing pink painted parking spots reserved for women that are a bit wider and longer than the average spot and closer to elevators.

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The Impact of War
7:46 am
Sat May 31, 2014

With VA Hospitals Overtaxed, Vets May Have To Go Private

Originally published on Sat May 31, 2014 11:38 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Following General Shinseki's resignation is as head of Veterans Affairs came the questions - the big questions about how to fix the VA and who's best to lead it. NPR's Tom Bowman covers the Pentagon. He's been speaking with veterans' groups and VA watchers and joins us in our studios.

Tom, thanks so much for being with us.

TOM BOWMAN, BYLINE: You're welcome, Scott.

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The Impact of War
7:46 am
Sat May 31, 2014

New Acting VA Secretary Faces Cultural Challenges

Originally published on Sat May 31, 2014 11:38 am

Eric Shinseki, secretary of the Department of Veterans Affairs, has resigned over the growing health care scandal. He said remaining in office would only distract from carrying out needed reforms.

Health
7:46 am
Sat May 31, 2014

Measles Hits 20-Year High In U.S.

Originally published on Sat May 31, 2014 11:38 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Measles was eliminated in the year 2000 from the United States, but a lot can change in a few years. Today, the Centers For Disease Control And Prevention says the infection rate is at a 20-year high for measles. There have been 288 cases reported for the first five months of 2014. A couple of weeks ago we spoke to William Schaffner, who teaches preventive medicine at the Vanderbilt University, about this very issue and he told us the huge factor in the outbreak is a lack of vaccinations.

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Around the Nation
7:46 am
Sat May 31, 2014

In Pizza Kitchens And On Assembly Lines, Temp Workers Face Abuse

Originally published on Sat May 31, 2014 11:38 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

More than 50 years after "Harvest Of Shame" aired, a new kind of migrant worker still toils in America. That's according to Michael Grabell, an investigative reporter with propublica.org. He says that temporary workers - according to U.S. labor department figures - are one of one of the fastest growing segments of the U.S. economy. And the nature of their work makes it ripe for abuse. Michael Grabell joins us from New York. Thanks very much for being with us.

MICHAEL GRABELL: Thank you for having me.

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Asia
7:46 am
Sat May 31, 2014

Pakistan Signals Possible Opening In Relations With India

Originally published on Sat May 31, 2014 11:38 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Earlier this week the Prime Minister of Pakistan attended the inauguration of the new Prime Minister of India. Now this event is notable not only because India and Pakistan fought several wars and both have nuclear weapons, but also because India's new prime minister, Narendra Modi, is a Hindu nationalist. He is not the kind of politician that you'd imagine Pakistan would welcome in power. We're joined now by Shuja Nawaz. He's director of The South Asia Center at The Atlantic Council. Shuja, thanks for being back with us.

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Mental Health
7:46 am
Sat May 31, 2014

One Wealthy Couple's Mission To Save Marriages, En Masse

Self-help guru Harville Hendrix and his wife Helen LaKelly Hunt are offering free relationship therapy workshops to Dallas-area couples. Many of the couples who attend have never gone to relationship counseling.
Courtesy of Darren Rollinson

Originally published on Sat May 31, 2014 6:29 pm

At a church in South Dallas, in one of the poorest parts of town, the room is packed with hundreds of couples. They're sitting, holding hands and staring into each other's eyes.

Their hosts, multi-millionaire couple Harville Hendrix and Helen LaKelly Hunt, are on a mission: to save marriages. They're trying to saturate the city with relationship counseling at workshops like this one, aiming to reach couples who wouldn't or couldn't otherwise afford to attend conventional marriage counseling.

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Middle East
7:46 am
Sat May 31, 2014

Assad Bound For Re-Election As War Appears At A Stalemate

Originally published on Sat May 31, 2014 11:38 am

As Syria goes to the polls next week in an election that President Bashar Assad is certain to win, journalist Nick Blanford tells NPR's Scott Simon.

Music Interviews
7:46 am
Sat May 31, 2014

Mandolin Orchestra Celebrates 90 Years Of Harmony

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 11:45 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

Mandolin fever swept the United States in the early 20th century, and alas, they didn't have a cure in those days. The lute-like instrument was the rage on college campuses. And mandolin orchestras - hundreds spread across the country played to wildly enthusiastic crowds.

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Author Interviews
7:46 am
Sat May 31, 2014

Laura Bridgeman, A Pioneer 50 Years Before Helen Keller

Originally published on Sat May 31, 2014 11:38 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

When the novel, "What Is Visible" opens, one of the most famous people in the world is about to meet a little girl who's supposed to be like her - another freak in bloom, is how Laura Bridgman puts it. The little girl is Helen Keller. Laura Bridgman was 50 years older and heralded around the world for learning language after losing four of her five senses as a child to scarlet fever.

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Shots - Health News
5:22 am
Sat May 31, 2014

Phone App Might Predict Manic Episodes In Bipolar Disorder

Manic, sad, up, down. Your voice may reveal mood shifts.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 8:31 am

There are smartphone apps for monitoring your diet, your drugs, even your heart. And now a Michigan psychiatrist is developing an app he hopes doctors will someday use to predict when a manic episode is imminent in patients with bipolar disorder.

People with the disorder alternate between crushing depression and wild manic episodes that come with the dangerous mix of uncontrollable energy and impaired judgment.

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Parallels
5:21 am
Sat May 31, 2014

Expanding The Panama Canal: The Problem Is Money, Not Mosquitoes

Men work on the Panama Canal locks near Panama City, on Feb. 21. An acrimonious financial dispute has slowed work on an expansion of the 100-year-old canal that will accommodate larger ships. The work is now expected to be completed next year.
Rodrigo Arangua AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat May 31, 2014 11:38 am

When the United States built the Panama Canal a century ago, it faced harrowing obstacles, from mudslides to malaria that killed thousands. But history doesn't appear to show a financial dispute with contractors. At least not one that halted labor on the maritime marvel.

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All Tech Considered
5:20 am
Sat May 31, 2014

Tech Week: C-E-Bros, Diversity Numbers And The Beats Deal

Rapper Dr. Dre is an executive at Apple, now.
Chelsea Lauren Getty Images for BET

The evidence of a lack of gender parity in technology keeps stacking up; this week we saw the fraternity-day emails of Snapchat CEO Evan Spiegel and the diversity and gender breakdowns that Google's been reluctant to share. Let's get right into your week in review:

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