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Shots - Health News
5:05 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

A Reason To Smile: Mexican Town Is A Destination For Dental Tourism

Mexico's 2010 census counted fewer than 5,500 residents in Los Algodones, but more than 350 dentists ply their trade here, serving U.S. and Canadian patients seeking affordable procedures.
Ted Robbins NPR

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 10:22 am

Sitting in a dentist's chair hardly rates as a vacation. But every year, tens of thousands of people go to a tiny border town near Yuma, Ariz., that has proclaimed itself the dental capital of Mexico.

Los Algodones is a virtual dental factory. Some 350 dentists work within a few blocks of downtown. Because of the low prices and fast service, most patients come for major work.

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NPR Ed
5:03 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

The One Thing Obama Didn't Say About Student Loan Repayment

President Obama signed a presidential memorandum he says could help an additional 5 million student loan borrowers — but only if they hear about it.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 8:09 pm

President Obama made big news today for student loan borrowers. He said he'll use his executive power to expand a program called Pay As You Earn, which limits borrowers' monthly debt payments to 10 percent of their discretionary income. Under the program, loans don't just get less expensive; they can actually disappear. The balance of a loan is forgiven after 20 years — 10 years if the borrower works in public service (for government or a nonprofit).

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Shots - Health News
5:02 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

Taking Statins May Make People Less Physically Active

Hey bro, taking statins does not give you a free ride in the exercise department.
MorelSO iStockphoto

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 8:47 am

People who take statin medications are less active than those not taking the cholesterol-lowering drugs, a study finds.

And that's a problem, because lack of activity increases the risk of heart disease and stroke, as well as other diseases. That's just what the statins are supposed to prevent. So people may be canceling out the good work of the statins if they're putting in more couch time.

Our first thought was that these people were taking it easy because hey, who needs to sweat when those statins are hard at work lowering cholesterol?

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NPR Ed
4:56 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

Why NYC Is Afraid Of Free Lunch For All

In New York, three-quarters of all students qualify for free or reduced-price meals, but a third of those simply don't participate.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 7:45 pm

More than 30 million kids a year participate in the National School Lunch Program, getting free or reduced-price meals at school. Hunger experts believe many more qualify but don't use it because a.) their families haven't filled out the necessary paperwork or b.) they don't want to be seen as poor.

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NPR Story
4:46 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

Detroit's Big Three Toss $26 Million Into Pot For 'Grand Bargain'

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 6:42 pm

As Detroit's bankruptcy trial inches closer, groups are contributing funds to what's become known as the "Grand Bargain" — the effort to protect retired city workers' pensions and the Detroit Institute of Arts from creditors. General Motors, Ford and Chrysler just announced they will pitch in, too. But, as Michigan Radio's Tracy Samilton reports, the entire Grand Bargain could unravel if the city's retirees reject the deal.

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Law
4:43 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

Supreme Court: At 21, Some Children Must Start Visa Process Over

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 6:42 pm

A fractured U.S. Supreme Court ruled Monday that when parents wait years to win legal entry into the United States, their children may have to go to the back of the line when they turn 21. The court's decision came on a 5-to-4 vote, with the majority split into two camps.

Under the Immigration Act, citizens and lawful permanent residents may sponsor family members petitions' for visas and green cards. In most cases, those immigrating with a minor child stand in line with their children. But even after approval, the process of getting a visa can take as long as decades.

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The Two-Way
4:18 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

Human Or Machine? AI Experts Reportedly Pass The 'Turing Test'

A computer program masquerading as a 13-year-old Ukrainian boy has reached a technological and philosophical threshold by passing the so-called Turing Test: it fooled a third of its human interlocutors into believing they were conversing with a real person instead of a machine.

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Music News
4:16 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

Apple Jacks The Headphone Port

What do you mean Apple is getting rid of the headphone jack? Where's it going?
iStockphoto

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 10:54 am

Apple may be set to end its use of the standard 3.5mm headphone connector — the mini plug — in favor of its proprietary connector, the Lightning port. If it was to do that, new iPhones, iPads and iPods wouldn't work with old headphones. It's had more than a few industry folks and Apple fanatics upset, to say the least.

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Around the Nation
4:06 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

In Las Vegas Shootings, Some Suspect Roots In Anti-Government Militias

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 6:42 pm

A married couple apparently killed two police officers and another woman in Las Vegas. The husband and wife, also killed in the shooting, appear to have held anti-government and anti-law enforcement views.

Education
4:06 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

With New Order, Obama Aims To Combat Student Debt Pressures

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 6:42 pm

President Obama is signing an executive order Monday, which will expand a loan forgiveness program for college debt. NPR's Mara Liasson looks at the program and the political salience of the issue.

Technology
4:06 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

In A Landmark First, An AI Program Fools The Turing Test

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 6:42 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's been billed as a breakthrough in artificial intelligence - a computer in England has fooled human beings into thinking it is a 13-year-old boy, not by the way it looks, but by the way it chats through instant messaging. NPR's Aarti Shahani reports some analysts are unimpressed by this digital trickery.

AARTI SHAHANI, BYLINE: A team from the University of Reading put the computer through a test - it's called the Turing Test - and to pass it, the computer had to fool people.

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News
4:06 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

Despite Details Of Bergdahl's Captivity, Answers Stay Scattered

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 6:42 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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Africa
4:06 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

One Week A Prime Minister: The Short Story Of Libya's Former Leader

New Libyan Prime Minister Ahmed Maiteg meets with his ministers for the first time, on June 2 in Tripoli. A week later, he was out of office.
Mahmud Turkia AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 10:46 pm

In Libya, you never know from one week to the next who's going to be prime minister. And when I met with the man in the job last week, it was clear no one is really in charge.

Ahmed Maiteg had only been prime minister a couple of days. He took office under the apparent protection of a militia that supports him, even as another man still claimed the job.

Maiteg, a 41-year-old businessman, was so new in the building that his staff was getting lost.

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News
4:06 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

Audit Reveals Vast Scale Of VA Waitlist Issues

Originally published on Mon June 9, 2014 6:42 pm

Before former Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki stepped down, he ordered an audit of the VA system, hoping to find how many hospitals were lying about wait times. The audit found that approximately 100,000 veterans are waiting too long for care at the VA.

The Salt
4:06 pm
Mon June 9, 2014

California Farmers Ask: Hey Buddy, Can You Spare Some Water?

Allen Peterson's farm, near the city of Turlock, Calif., lies next to a concrete-lined canal full of water. He's one of the lucky ones.
Dan Charles/NPR

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 9:29 am

Imagine if a gallon of milk cost $3 in your town, but 100 miles away it cost $100, or even $200.

Something similar is happening right now in California with water that farmers use to irrigate their crops. Some farmers are paying 50 or even 100 times more for that water than others who live just an hour's drive away.

The situation is provoking debate about whether water in California should move more freely, so that it can be sold to the highest bidder.

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