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The Two-Way
2:36 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

Eric Cantor Says He'll Quit Majority Leader Post After Primary Defeat

House Majority Leader Eric Cantor of Virginia takes the podium to speak to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, on Wednesday. He announced that he would step down as majority leader on July 31.
Charles Dharapak AP

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 5:50 pm

This post was updated at 4:50 p.m. ET

House Majority Leader Eric Cantor, fresh from a stunning primary upset at the hands of a Tea Party rival, said today that he would vacate his leadership post by the end of July to make room for a successor.

"Effective July 31, I will be stepping down as majority leader," Cantor told reporters at a news conference. "It is with great humility that I do so."

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The Two-Way
2:32 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

Is Bergdahl Exchange Really Unprecedented?

Chief Warrant Officer Michael Durant, wounded when the helicopter he was piloting was shot down in Somalia, arrives at Andrews Air Force Base in Maryland, on Oct. 16, 1993. He was held captive for 11 days.
Joe Marquette AP

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 3:34 pm

Amid Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel's testimony to a House panel about Bowe Bergdahl's release came this nugget: Was the deal under which the Army sergeant was swapped for senior Taliban members in Guantanamo Bay unprecedented?

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Europe
2:27 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

Across Europe, Anti-Uber Protests Clog City Streets

A taxi precedes demonstrators during a protest against Uber in Barcelona on Wednesday. A conventional taxi license in Spain can cost 137,000 euros ($185,400), making competition from services like Uber a major financial issue.
Josep Lago AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 6:24 pm

In capital cities across Europe, taxi drivers took to the streets without passengers Wednesday afternoon. They slowed to a snail's pace in what Parisians called "Operation Escargot." Horns blared around Trafalgar Square in London. In Berlin, taxis massed at the Central Station. All to protest the smartphone app Uber.

"We've opened Frankfurt last week, we've opened Lille in France, which is our third city this week. We opened Barcelona a couple weeks ago, and there's many more cities to go," Uber's Pierre-Dimitri Gore-Coty says.

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The Two-Way
1:26 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

Brazil Furious Over Ad Showing Christ The Redeemer In An Italian Jersey

A video image from an advertisement run by Italian state broadcaster RAI showing Christ the Redeemer in an Italian soccer jersey.
YouTube

It's the most iconic image of Brazil: the Christ the Redeemer statue, perched atop Rio de Janiero, looking down with his arms spread wide in love and understanding.

Now imagine the towering figure wearing a soccer jersey — and not even Brazil's.

Controversy has broken out over an Italian TV advertisement for the World Cup that shows the sculpture draped in the blue jersey of the Azzurri, or Italy's national team, and featuring the slogan "Brazil awaits us."

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The Two-Way
1:10 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

Bill To Allow Refinancing Of Student Loans Dies In Senate

"Who does Washington work for?" asked Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., after her bill that would let people refinance student debt was shot down Wednesday.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 2:42 pm

A bill that would have let millions of people refinance their student loans at a lower interest rate has failed in the Senate, after Republicans objected that it included a tax on the wealthy to pay for it. The measure would have allowed people with older loans to benefit from today's low interest rates.

The bill from Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., didn't get past a procedural vote, falling by a 56-38 vote. Called the Bank on Students Emergency Loan Refinancing Act, it was shot down days after President Obama urged Congress to help ease the burden of student debt.

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Parallels
1:01 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

How To Survive, And Thrive, After 5 Years As A Hostage

Joe Cicippio was held in chains at 20 different locations in Lebanon. Some hostages have had trouble readjusting following their release. He says he focused on the good things in his life, including music, to get him through his captivity.
Greg Myre NPR

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 3:57 pm

Joe Cicippio was held hostage by the Islamic group Hezbollah in Lebanon for five years, often chained to a radiator in a room with blacked-out windows, cut off entirely from the outside world. Within weeks of his release in 1991, he asked if he could go back to his old job as the comptroller at the American University of Beirut.

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Can I Just Tell You?
12:24 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

Do You Want The Truth, Or Do You Just Like Your Story Better?

Looking at the question of academic success among school-aged black males.
Christopher Futcher iStock

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 4:23 pm

Finally today, another of my sad but true stories. A while back I was working on a lengthy television documentary with a colleague who was a very experienced producer, a veteran of many lengthy and complicated projects; in other words: she knew what she was doing. We had gotten to the final edit stage of a project where we were going back over a story that had been huge news at one point, but about which there had been a lot of misinformation, and one of the things we were trying to do with our piece was correct the record.

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Author Interviews
12:24 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

The Difficulty And Drama Of Building A Top Black Magazine

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 5:10 pm

This year marks the 50th anniversary of many pivotal events in the civil rights movement, and to commemorate "Freedom Summer," Tell Me More is diving into books that explore that theme.

Back in 1969, faces of color doing any job in major media were few and far between. But that was the year an unlikely group of businessmen and salesmen decided to create a magazine specifically for black women: Essence.

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Economy
12:24 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

Could Detroit's Automakers Save Its Art Treasures?

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 4:23 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Let's turn now to Detroit where the city's effort to come back from bankruptcy just got a boost. The Big Three automakers - Ford, General Motors and Chrysler - have put down some serious financial muscle to help save the Detroit Institute of Arts, the DIA - $26 million to be exact. That could help save the city from having to sell the art to satisfy creditors. It's not just art admirers who are keeping their eye on this deal. People, from retirees worrying about their pensions to the creditors Detroit owes, could be affected by this.

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Beauty Shop
12:24 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

'Washington Post' Op-Ed Tone Deaf On View Of Sexual Assault?

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 4:23 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this TELL ME MORE from NPR News. We are continuing our discussion with our Beauty Shop panel of journalists and commentators. Andra Gillespie, Bridget Johnson, Connie Schultz and Alexis Wilkinson are with us. Bridget Johnson, I just wanted to ask you briefly about, you know, your take on Hillary Clinton, and the rollout of the book and the storylines that are emerging around her assumed presidential candidacy so far - not announced, but that seems to be where things are going.

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Beauty Shop
12:24 pm
Wed June 11, 2014

What Does Cantor's Loss Say About The Republicans' Future?

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 4:23 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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The Protojournalist
11:13 am
Wed June 11, 2014

5 TV Shows That Deserve Another Chance

LeVar Burton, the face of Reading Rainbow.
From the Reading Rainbow website

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 9:05 pm

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The Two-Way
10:29 am
Wed June 11, 2014

Bergdahl Swap Was 'Extraordinary Situation,' Hagel Says

Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel testifies before the House Armed Services Committee on Wednesday about the controversial prisoner swap with the Taliban.
Susan Walsh AP

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 5:24 pm

Updated at 11:51 a.m. ET

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The Two-Way
10:16 am
Wed June 11, 2014

The Cooter Effect: Did Ben Jones Help Unseat Eric Cantor?

Former Rep. Ben Jones, a Democrat, wrote an open letter calling on voters to oust Eric Cantor in the Republicans' open primary — an event that transpired Tuesday. A former actor, Jones played the role of Cooter on TV show The Dukes of Hazzard. He's seen here meeting a fan last year.
Erik S. Lesser EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 2:18 pm

To the pile of explanations for the shocking primary loss by House Majority Leader Eric Cantor to challenger Dave Brat, add one more: the idea that Democrats and independents tilted the Republicans' open primary at the prompting of former Rep. Ben Jones, a Democrat.

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Shots - Health News
9:47 am
Wed June 11, 2014

More Young Adults Get Inpatient Psychiatric Care After Health Law

Mental health admissions of young people rose 9 percent after implementation of a key portion of the Affordable Care Act, researchers say.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 8:29 am

Expanded coverage for young adults under the Affordable Care Act substantially raised inpatient hospital visits related to mental health, finds a study conducted by researchers at Indiana and Purdue universities.

That looks like good news: Better access to care for a population with higher-than-average levels of mental illness that too often endangers them and people nearby.

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