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The Two-Way
6:56 pm
Fri June 13, 2014

At World Cup, Patriotism Is More Than Jersey Deep

Tourists pose with a U.S. and Brazilian flag ahead of the 2014 World Cup in Rio de Janeiro.
Eddie Keogh Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 7:40 pm

On the streets of Copacabana, fans from all nations are sporting their jerseys: Lots of Colombians in bright yellow, Chileans in red, sky blue stripes for Argentina, Mexican green, the German tricolor, a trickling of Aussie yellow, and, of course, the ever-present gold and green of Brazil.

You get the feeling that many of these folks brought along just one shirt in their suitcase, to be worn from now until their team is eliminated.

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Shots - Health News
6:35 pm
Fri June 13, 2014

Cancer When You're Young Isn't Always 'The Fault In Our Stars'

In The Fault in Our Stars, Gus and Hazel, played by Ansel Elgort and Shailene Woodley, play two teenagers with cancer.
James Bridges AP

Originally published on Thu June 19, 2014 12:55 pm

It's hard not to be charmed by Hazel and Gus, the flippant yet noble teenagers with cancer in the hit film The Fault in Our Stars. But movies have a bad habit of taking life-or-death health crises and turning them into cliché.

To find out if The Fault in Our Stars stayed true, we called on the experts – people who have had cancer as teenagers and young adults. Not surprisingly, most of them have read the book and seen the movie.

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Music Interviews
6:23 pm
Fri June 13, 2014

Jenny Scheinman Reaches Out To Her Father In Song

Jenny Scheinman made her name in the New York City jazz scene, but she grew up on a bluff in Northern California's Humboldt County, where she now lives again.
Joshua Black Wilkins Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 9:31 pm

For more conversations with music makers, check out NPR's Music Interviews.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Two-Way
6:00 pm
Fri June 13, 2014

Tea Party Firebrand To Challenge McCarthy For Majority Leader

Rep. Raul Labrador, R-Idaho, is making a long-shot bid to replace Rep. Eric Cantor as House majority leader.
John Miller AP

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 7:18 pm

Two-term Idaho Republican Raul Labrador announced Friday that he is throwing his hat into the ring for the chance to replace outgoing Rep. Eric Cantor as House majority leader.

Labrador's candidacy ensures that Rep. Kevin McCarthy of California will not go unchallenged for the chamber's No. 2 leadership spot, which opened up on Tuesday after Cantor's stunning primary loss to Tea Party challenger David Brat.

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A Blog Supreme
5:30 pm
Fri June 13, 2014

Ethereal Jazz Singer Jimmy Scott Dies

Jimmy Scott performs at the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival in 2001.
Leon Morris Redferns

Originally published on Sat June 14, 2014 1:59 pm

Singer Jimmy Scott died of natural causes Thursday morning at his home in Las Vegas at age 88, according to his booking agent, Jean-Pierre Leduc.

Scott suffered from Kallmann's syndrome, a lifelong affliction that prevented his body from maturing through puberty. The condition slowed his growth, leaving his stature at 4 feet 11 inches until his late 30s. It also affected his vocal cords, giving him a high voice that was often misidentified as a woman's.

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This Week's Must Read
5:27 pm
Fri June 13, 2014

Eric Cantor And A Defeat Of Biblical Proportions

cover detail

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 6:52 pm

After his unexpected defeat in the Republican primary, House Majority Leader Eric Cantor opened a press conference by saying, "In the Jewish faith, you know, I grew up, went to Hebrew school, read a lot in the Old Testament, and you learn a lot about individual setbacks."

This is not mere piety, and the King James Version of the Bible, made up of the Old Testament and the New, is a terrific book. The heroes of these stories do not lead the race wire to wire. Those who are elevated are tested and taught by disaster.

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Iraq
5:05 pm
Fri June 13, 2014

With Iraq In Turmoil, Kirkuk's Leader Says Region Is Calm

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 6:23 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, BYLINE: As ISIS militants have rolled south through Iraq, closing in on Baghdad, there's a very different story in the northern city of Kirkuk. There Kurdish peshmerga soldiers have taken over after the Iraqi army fled.

Kirkuk is a huge prize. It's got rich oilfields, and for years, the city has been hotly contested between Kurds and the Iraqi government. I'm joined now by the Kurdish governor of the Kirkuk province, Dr. Najmaldin Karim. Dr. Karim, welcome to the program.

GOVERNOR NAJMALDIN KARIM: Thank you.

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It's All Politics
4:58 pm
Fri June 13, 2014

4 Takeaways From Hillary Clinton's 'Fresh Air' Interview

Hillary Clinton promotes her new book, Hard Choices, in Chicago on Wednesday. The former senator and secretary of state had a lively and much-talked-about chat this week with Fresh Air's Terry Gross.
Stacy Thacker AP

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 10:28 pm

So when exactly did Hillary Clinton change her mind on same-sex marriage? That question was left unanswered in the former secretary of state's lively exchange with Fresh Air host Terry Gross.

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The Two-Way
4:55 pm
Fri June 13, 2014

Cliffhanger: Authorities Set Fire To House Teetering On The Brink

A house is deliberately set on fire Friday, days after part of the ground it was resting on collapsed into Lake Whitney, Texas.
Brandon Wade Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 7:02 pm

Robb and Jenyce Webb are definitely regretting the day they bought waterfront property on Lake Whitney.

They paid about $700,000 for an idyllic cliff-side home south of Fort Worth, Texas, two years ago, where they hoped to live out their retirement years. But sometime last year, their dreams began to (literally) crumble.

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From Our Listeners
4:49 pm
Fri June 13, 2014

A Tip From Ben Stiller: On Set, A 'Chicken' Is Not What It Seems

When Ben Stiller hears "chicken in the gate," rarely does he actually present someone with a live chicken.
Tiziana Fabi AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 25, 2014 12:14 pm

Each line of work has its own cryptic code: words and phrases that would baffle any outsider. These terms may sound like nonsense to someone with untrained ears, but to those who operate in a certain world, their meanings are as clear as day.

To get a better handle on some of the stranger things people say at work, All Things Considered is kicking off a new series called "Trade Lingo." It's a quest to mine the jewels of meaning beneath the jargon.

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Education
4:32 pm
Fri June 13, 2014

A Campus Dilemma: Sure, 'No' Means 'No,' But Exactly What Means 'Yes'?

Many colleges are grappling with how to define consensual sexual activity between students. Antioch College in Yellow Springs, Ohio, mandates that students get verbal permission before making any sexual advance.
Peggy Turbett The Plain Dealer/Landov

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 6:23 pm

As the federal government presses colleges to improve the way they handle cases of sexual assault, schools are turning their focus to defining "consent" — how to distinguish between activity that's consensual and activity that's not.

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Code Switch
4:28 pm
Fri June 13, 2014

An Opera Remembers The Tragedy Of An Asian-American Soldier

Andrew Stenson plays Pvt. Danny Chen in An American Soldier, a new opera about the hazing and death of the Chinese-American soldier from New York City.
Sarah Tilotta NPR

Originally published on Sat June 14, 2014 12:34 pm

About two years ago, playwright David Henry Hwang turned down an offer to write a play about the brief life and suicide of Army Pvt. Danny Chen.

But an opera? He couldn't refuse.

"This is a story with big emotions, big primary colors in a way, and big plot events," says Hwang, who wrote the libretto for An American Soldier, a new hourlong opera commissioned by Washington National Opera.

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The Two-Way
4:23 pm
Fri June 13, 2014

Chicago 'Heroin Highway' Bust Shows A 'New Face Of Organized Crime'

Authorities say the drug operation allowed customers to pay at one location, pick up the heroin at another and be back on the expressway within minutes.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 5:56 pm

Authorities say they've broken up a major heroin and crack cocaine distribution ring in Chicago.

A joint federal and local task force that includes the DEA, FBI, Chicago police and other law enforcement agencies arrested and charged more than two dozen gang members who allegedly supplied a significant amount of heroin to customers coming from the city and suburbs.

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Code Switch
4:21 pm
Fri June 13, 2014

For These Inner-City Dads, Fatherhood Comes With Homework

Edward Pitchford is a responsible-fatherhood specialist with the Center for Urban Families in Baltimore.
Courtesy of Carde Cornish

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 5:32 pm

About two dozen dads — all African-Americans, ranging in age from their early 20s to late 40s — are standing in a circle participating in a call-and-response exercise:

Call: You done broke them chains.
Response: From my body and my brain!
Call: But you was deaf, dumb and blind.
Response: 'Til I took back my mind!

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National Security
4:11 pm
Fri June 13, 2014

As Bergdahl Touches Down In Texas, Reintegration Begins

Originally published on Fri June 13, 2014 6:23 pm

Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl is back in the U.S. The former Taliban prisoner is now undergoing treatment at an Army hospital in San Antonio, Texas.

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