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The Two-Way
7:48 am
Sun June 15, 2014

Obama Steps In To End Philadelphia Commuter Rail Strike

Unaware of the work stoppage Roy Pearson waits for a SEPTA commuter train at the East Falls commuter rail station in Philadelphia on Saturday.
Joseph Kaczmarek AP

President Obama has stepped in to end a commuter rail strike in Philadelphia.

On Saturday, Obama granted Republican Gov. Tom Corbett's request for the creation of an emergency board to mediate the contract issues.

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Africa
7:26 am
Sun June 15, 2014

Dorm Living For Staff Of New British Embassy In Somalia

Originally published on Sun June 15, 2014 11:38 am

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

The Obama administration says that it will soon appoint a U.S. ambassador to reopen the mission in Somalia. Now the U.S. embassy closed its doors in 1991 when the Somali government collapsed and warlords took over the country. The danger sharpened two years later when Somali fighters shot down two U.S. helicopters, killing 18 U.S. soldiers in an incident that came to be known as Black Hawk Down.

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Middle East
7:26 am
Sun June 15, 2014

Three Factions Vie In Iraq's Growing Crisis

Originally published on Sun June 15, 2014 11:38 am

Shiites in Iraq appear to be joining militias to defend themselves against Sunni insurgents. NPR's Scott Simon gets the latest from NPR's Leila Fadel in Erbil.

Politics
7:26 am
Sun June 15, 2014

Congressman Pushes Income-Based Student Loan Plan

Originally published on Sun June 15, 2014 11:38 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Iraq
7:26 am
Sun June 15, 2014

The Pros And Cons Of U.S. Air Strikes In Northern Iraq

Originally published on Sun June 15, 2014 11:38 am

Transcript

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Parallels
4:35 am
Sun June 15, 2014

In London, An Underground Home For The World's Mosquitoes

Dr. James Logan, an entomologist, studies mosquitoes from around the world in an effort to make them less dangerous. The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine keeps them in a cavern beneath the streets of London. The bowls contain mosquito larvae in water, while the boxes are where the adults live.
Ari Shapiro NPR

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 8:37 am

You can't hear it over the noise of London's traffic. But it's there. That faint, whining hum. Right under my feet, thousands of mosquitoes are dining on human blood.

To visit them, you have to go through a sliding glass door into the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. This school started as a hospital on the Thames River, where doctors treated sailors returning from faraway places with strange parasites.

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The Salt
6:35 pm
Sat June 14, 2014

It's Pink, It's Fresh, It's Everywhere: Rosé Is Rising!

The intensity of the pink color of a rosé wine is determined by the length of time the grape juice has contact with the grape skin during the winemaking process. The wine on the left had the longest skin contact.
Sindhu Hirani Blume NPR

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 9:05 am

The pink wine that got a bad rap for years has become synonymous with summer. Rosé is fashionable, complex and fresh. Even Brad and Angelina are in the rosé business. But why now?

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U.S.
5:07 pm
Sat June 14, 2014

Before Vegas Shooting, Couple Traveled To Bundy Ranch Stand-Off

Originally published on Sat June 14, 2014 6:17 pm

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ARUN RATH, HOST:

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Iraq
5:07 pm
Sat June 14, 2014

To Explain Iraq's Crisis, Some Lawmakers Point To 2011 Withdrawal

Originally published on Sun June 15, 2014 12:25 am

The Obama administration is drawing criticism from Republicans for its handling of the deteriorating security situation in Iraq. NPR's Arun Rath speaks with national political correspondent Mara Liasson about the administrations choices and the possible political consequences for the President.

Iraq
5:07 pm
Sat June 14, 2014

As ISIS Advances, Iraq's Military Melts Down

Originally published on Sat June 14, 2014 6:17 pm

Forces from the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, or ISIS, now control much of Iraq, as the country's military has disintegrated in the face of the group's radical troops. NPR's Arun Rath talks to The Guardian's Martin Chulov in Baghdad about the latest.

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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Iraq
5:07 pm
Sat June 14, 2014

Military Strongmen: Seeding Chaos In The Name Of Power

Iraqis inspect destruction in the street following an explosion in Sadr City, Baghdad's northern Shiite-majority district in May.
Ali al-Saadi AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 15, 2014 8:11 am

In a region torn apart by violence, a leader who promises security above all else can be appealing. Three years after the chaos of the Arab Spring, these strongmen types are rising again in the Middle East.

Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki is one of them, though he has yet to overcome the disaster now unfolding in Iraq. Iraqi lawyer Zaid al-Ali tells NPR's Arun Rath that Maliki is partly to blame for the crisis.

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NPR Story
5:07 pm
Sat June 14, 2014

In 'Bootleg,' Kilgariff Sets Her Comic Commentary To Music

Originally published on Sat June 14, 2014 6:17 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Again, thanks for listening. This is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. I'm Arun Rath. Comedian Karen Kilgariff has gone through a number of transformations, over the years. She was a mainstay on the California stand-up scene before she became a cast member on the revolutionary sketch program "Mr. Show With Bob And David." She was the long-time head writer for Ellen DeGeneres. Now she has emerged as a singer-songwriter, a pretty twisted one. Her new album is called "Live At The Bootleg."

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "I WANT TO WIN")

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Business
5:07 pm
Sat June 14, 2014

In Silicon Valley, Some Entrepreneurs Seek Social Change

Originally published on Sat June 14, 2014 6:17 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

Every now and then, you'll hear story about a kid who has a lemonade stand or cupcake sale to raise money for a good cause. Beyond that heartwarming headline is a belief that you can do capitalism with a conscience. Well, this is an idea that has taken root in Silicon Valley, in a big, big way.

Carlos Watson is the co-founder of the online magazine, Ozy. He says that young entrepreneurs there are starting businesses for social change. So, Carlos, who are these idealists? And what are the causes they want to support?

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Technology
5:07 pm
Sat June 14, 2014

Moving Beyond The Turing Test To Judge Artificial Intelligence

Originally published on Sat June 14, 2014 6:17 pm

Transcript

ARUN RATH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR West. I'm Arun Rath. The code breaking skills of mathematician Alan Turing helped the Allies win World War II. He also devised the Turing Test, a measure of artificial intelligence. Last week, a computer program pretending to be a 13-year-old boy named Eugene Gustman was the first to pass the test - meaning the age of artificial intelligence has begun - maybe. Gary Marcus is a professor of cognitive science at New York University. I asked him to explain how the test works.

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The Two-Way
4:32 pm
Sat June 14, 2014

Chuck Noll, Who Led Steelers To 4 Super Bowl Titles, Dies

Pittsburgh Steelers head coach Chuck Noll shown in 1974 watching his team in action on the sidelines.
AP

Originally published on Mon June 16, 2014 11:02 am

Chuck Noll, the only NFL coach to lead a team to four Super Bowl titles, died on Friday at age 82.

Liz Reid, from NPR member station WESA in Pittsburgh, reports the Steelers coach was considered one of the greatest. She filed this report for our Newscast unit:

"Noll took the head coaching job in Pittsburgh in 1969, after Penn State's Joe Paterno turned it down.

"The Steelers won a single game that season, but under Noll's guidance, they steadily improved their record until clinching their first Super Bowl victory in January 1975.

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