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The Two-Way
12:23 pm
Wed June 18, 2014

House Panel Grills GM CEO And Investigator Over Switch Recall

Family members of victims of a faulty GM ignition switch lined the rear wall of a congressional hearing with their photos Wednesday.
Cliff Owen AP

Questions about a potential cover-up and an unhealthy corporate culture dominated a congressional hearing today about General Motors' handling of a deadly safety flaw in ignition switches in millions of its cars.

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The Two-Way
12:18 pm
Wed June 18, 2014

The Twisty Tale Of The World's Most Expensive Stamp

David Redden of Sotheby's auction house holds a case containing the sole surviving "British Guiana One-Cent Black on Magenta" stamp dating from 1856.
Oli Scarff Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 1:42 pm

Blemished, battered and cut, the "British Guiana One-Cent Black on Magenta" is a stamp with a twisty tale to tell, one that begins in the hands of a young Scottish boy and passes through the hands of a killer.

The 1856 treasure was sold at Sotheby's in New York for $9.5 million on Tuesday to a phone buyer who wished to remain anonymous — the fourth time it has broken the auction record for a single postage stamp.

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The Salt
12:15 pm
Wed June 18, 2014

Goats In The City? Making A Case For Detroit's Munching Mowers

Leonard Pollara, of Idyll Farms, with some of the goats housed in the Brightmoor neighborhood of Detroit.
Max Ortiz Courtesy of The Detroit News

Originally published on Fri June 20, 2014 5:14 pm

As more urban folk strive to produce their own food, gardens both large and small are popping up everywhere. And while it's not unheard of for city dwellers to keep bees and even chickens, only a brave few have been willing to try their hand at goats.

Like hedge fund manager Mark Spitznagel, who recently tried to revitalize Detroit's Brightmoor neighborhood with a herd of 18 baby goats.

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Parallels
12:08 pm
Wed June 18, 2014

What's Next For Iraq?

A woman and a girl wash at a camp in Kalak set up for those fleeing the fighting in northern Iraq. The escalating conflict has sent shock waves across the region and is further destabilizing the Middle East.
Dan Kitwood Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 9:40 pm

This post was updated at 9:40 p.m. ET to reflect the Obama administration's pressure on the Iraqi government.

A week ago, it would have been difficult to find anyone in the U.S. arguing for renewed U.S. military action in Iraq. Now there's a furious debate about what the U.S. should, or shouldn't, do in the latest Iraqi crisis.

The drama seemed to erupt out of nowhere as Islamist extremists captured Mosul, one of the country's largest and most important cities, and kept pushing south toward the capital Baghdad.

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The Two-Way
10:52 am
Wed June 18, 2014

Washington Redskins' Trademark Registrations Cancelled

Several of the Washington Redskins' trademark registrations have been canceled. The team will appeal the decision.
Nick Wass AP

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 5:25 pm

The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office has revoked the trademark of the NFL's Washington Redskins, after ruling in a case brought by five Native Americans who say the name disparages them. While the decision could have wide repercussions, it does not require the team to change its name. It is also subject to appeal, which the team has confirmed it will pursue.

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The Two-Way
10:41 am
Wed June 18, 2014

Japan Bans Possession Of Child Pornography

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 12:51 pm

Japan has banned the possession of child pornography, with some notable exceptions: manga, animation and computer graphics.

Parliament's upper house approved the measure Wednesday; the lower house passed the bill last month.

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The Two-Way
9:18 am
Wed June 18, 2014

U.S. Offshore Wind Energy Area Would Nearly Double Under New Plan

The Department of the Interior is proposing a large expansion of U.S. efforts to make energy from offshore winds, with a plan centered off the Massachusetts coast. Here, a 2010 photo shows a sunrise over Nantucket Sound.
Julia Cumes AP

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 11:55 am

A large swath of the Atlantic Ocean could soon be used to generate electricity, as a U.S. agency proposes opening more than 1,000 square miles of ocean to wind energy projects. The area is off the coast of Massachusetts, which has been working on the proposal with federal officials.

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Shots - Health News
9:03 am
Wed June 18, 2014

Fewer Women Are Having Labor Induced Early

Originally published on Thu June 19, 2014 7:43 am

There has been a major effort in the past several years to reduce the rate of early elective deliveries. Those are births that for no medical reason are hastened by inducing labor or performing a cesarean section before the pregnancy has reached 39 weeks of gestation.

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The Two-Way
8:25 am
Wed June 18, 2014

Ukraine's President Announces Plan For Unilateral Cease-Fire

Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko (far right) attends a graduation ceremony at the National University of Defense of Ukraine in Kiev on Wednesday. In a speech there, the president said he is ordering a cease-fire in the struggle against armed militants.
Gleb Garanich Reuters/Landov

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 10:58 am

President Petro Poroshenko, whose rise to power in Ukraine coincided with an aggressive crackdown on separatist militants, is calling for a temporary cease-fire by government forces. The break in action would allow the armed opposition to lay down their weapons, Poroshenko says.

The cease-fire will begin in "the next few days," Reuters reports, citing a Ukrainian defense official. The plan was announced during an appearance by Poroshenko at a military academy Wednesday.

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The Two-Way
7:30 am
Wed June 18, 2014

Militants Attack Iraq's Largest Oil Refinery As Sectarian Clashes Spread

An Iraqi boy and other civilians look at the aftermath of a car bomb in Baghdad's Sadr City on Wednesday. The violence in the Shiite district comes as Sunni militants advance in northern Iraq.
Karim Kadim AP

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 11:06 am

The Sunni militant group that has stormed across Iraq invaded the country's largest oil refinery today, hitting it with mortars. The government is using limited air attacks to strike back at ISIS, which now controls large areas of Iraq's north.

"The oil refinery in Beiji has been under siege since the militant fighters of ISIS seized the town of Beiji in their sweep through northern Iraq," NPR's Deborah Amos reports from Irbil, Iraq. "In an offensive at dawn, ISIS fighters attacked the refinery with machine-gun fire and mortars, according to Iraqi security forces."

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Asia
6:44 am
Wed June 18, 2014

In Japan, A KitKat Bar May Be A Ticket To Ride

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 7:09 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Linda Wertheimer. Got a piece of a Kit Kat bar? In Japan, that could be your ticket to ride. People traveling on the Sanriku Railway there can now use special Kit Kat candy wrappers as train tickets. It's part of a campaign to revive tourism after the tsunami in 2011, which badly damaged the railway's tracks and bridges. In Japan, it's common to give Kit Kats to wish somebody good luck for the next year. It also means a train ride. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Space
6:07 am
Wed June 18, 2014

International Space Station Gets Espresso Machine

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 7:09 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Renee Montagne. The International Space Station is getting a real coffee maker. Not surprisingly, this first-ever, zero-gravity espresso machine is Italian, developed by the coffee company Lavazza. Up until now, astronauts made do with the instant stuff. The brewer should be there in time for the arrival this fall of Italy's first woman astronaut. She tweeted her excitement - I'll get to operate the first space espresso machine. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Africa
5:20 am
Wed June 18, 2014

Bitter, Incomplete Divorce Blamed For South Sudan's Fighting

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 7:09 am

What happened after Africa's biggest country split in two? Renee Montagne talks to James Copnall about his book, A Poisonous Thorn in Our Hearts: Sudan and South Sudan's Bitter and Incomplete Divorce.

Sports
5:17 am
Wed June 18, 2014

Troubles Put Aside, Brazilians Embrace World Cup

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 7:09 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

We now turn to Brazil and the World Cup. Yesterday, the host country played Mexico, and it was a disappointing performance for home-team fans. It was a draw. Neither side scored. Still, Brazilians are feeling more positive about the World Cup. NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro reports from Sao Paulo.

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Food
5:08 am
Wed June 18, 2014

Uruguayan Soccer Team's Caramel Spread Denied Entry Into Brazil

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 7:09 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

And let's stay with the World Cup in Brazil, where Uruguayan fans and media are crying foul - not on the soccer pitch, but involving Brazil's customs.

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

Customs officials confiscated more than 80 pounds of a favorite snack spread from Uruguay's soccer team, one of the World Cup favorites, when they entered the country last week. The spread, called dulce de leche, is like the Nutella of South America. You can spread it on bread; use it as ice cream topping.

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