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Parallels
3:31 am
Mon June 3, 2013

For Young Somali Journalists, Work Often Turns Deadly

Reporter Donna Ali, 18, awaits her turn to go on air. Shabelle hires reporters as young as 15.
Gregory Warner NPR

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 9:05 pm

Shabelle Media is Somalia's largest news outlet — and a very dangerous place to work. Of the 12 journalists gunned down in the country last year, four were reporting for Shabelle.

A number of the reporters are teenagers, some as young as 15. The reporters almost never venture out of the office, which is outfitted with sleeping quarters and a kitchen.

Why are Shabelle's young journalists being targeted more than others?

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Business
3:29 am
Mon June 3, 2013

Surf Air Offers 'All You Can Fly' For A Monthly Fee

Surf Air CEO Wade Eyerly stands in front of one of the airline's turboprop planes in Burbank, Calif. Eyerly boasts that Surf Air will offer frequent commuters a corporate jet experience for not much more than regular airline prices.
Wendy Kaufman NPR

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 10:23 am

A new airline with an innovative, "all you can fly" business model is about to take off. Federal regulators have just given California-based Surf Air permission to begin passenger service.

Surf Air is a big idea with small planes. For a flat monthly fee, subscribers will be able to take all the trips they want among four California cities: San Francisco, Monterey, Santa Barbara and Los Angeles.

The airline's co-founder and CEO Wade Eyerly boasts that Surf Air will offer frequent commuters a corporate jet experience for not that much more than regular airline prices.

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Education
5:59 pm
Sun June 2, 2013

Why Some Schools Want To Expel Suspensions

When Garfield High School in Los Angeles stopped suspending students for "willful defiance" several years ago. Tuesday, the Los Angeles Unified School District board voted to follow suit in all Los Angeles schools.
Reed Saxon AP

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 12:12 am

The effectiveness of school suspensions is up for debate. California is the most recent battleground, but a pattern of uneven application and negative outcomes is apparent across the country.

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Books News & Features
5:13 pm
Sun June 2, 2013

Arthur Geisert's 'Thunderstorm' Celebrates Life On The Prairie

Arthur Geisert's Thunderstorm follows a tempest in the rural Midwest.
Enchanted Lion Books

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 11:39 am

Arthur Geisert is the author of more than two dozen children's picture books. Three of his titles have won The New York Times Best Illustrated Children's Book Award. He's most famous for his intricate illustrations of the Midwest — sprawling prairie, family farms and his signature mischievous pigs.

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From Our Listeners
5:09 pm
Sun June 2, 2013

Three-Minute Fiction Readings: 'Litter' And 'The Shirt'

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sun June 2, 2013 8:18 pm

NPR's Bob Mondello and Susan Stamberg read excerpts of two of the best submissions for Round 11 of our short story contest. They read Litter by Kalad Hovatter of Orange, Calif., and The Shirt by Jennifer Anderson of Shorewood, Wis. You can read their full stories below and find other stories on our Three-Minute Fiction page or on Facebook.

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Author Interviews
5:09 pm
Sun June 2, 2013

Mapping 'The World' Of A Remote Afghan Village

In Oqa, Afghanistan, Boston weaves a saddlebag for her husband's donkey. The weavers of Oqa also weave large carpets, earning less than $1 a day for their work.
Courtesy Anna Badkhen

Originally published on Sun June 2, 2013 8:18 pm

When freelance journalist Anna Badkhen returned to Afghanistan in 2011, she set her eyes on a region so remote it doesn't exist on Google Maps.

In her new book, The World Is A Carpet: Four Seasons in an Afghan Village, Badkhen chronicles her time in Oqa - a rural, rainless village of 240 people and "40 doorless huts."

For many of its residents, survival hinges on the fingers of women and children. They engage in the local tradition of carpet weaving, earning about 40 cents a day for carpets that eventually sell for $5,000 to $20,000 abroad.

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The Two-Way
4:48 pm
Sun June 2, 2013

Darrell Issa Calls White House Press Secretary A 'Paid Liar'

California Rep. Darrell Issa, chairman of the House Oversight Committee, questioning Attorney General Eric Holder last week.
Carolyn Kaster AP

Rep. Darrell Issa, a Republican from California, took a heavy shot at White House Press Secretary Jay Carney today on CNN.

Issa said Carney was a "paid liar." He said Carney was "making things up" when he said the IRS targeting of Tea Party groups was undertaken by "rogue" local employees.

The review, said Issa, was "coordinated directly from headquarters in Washington."

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Music Interviews
4:11 pm
Sun June 2, 2013

Eleanor Friedberger Unashamed Of Her Favorite Sounds

Eleanor Friedberger's new solo album is Personal Record.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun June 2, 2013 8:18 pm

Eleanor Friedberger was born in 1976, a little too late to have experienced much of that decade's music firsthand. But the singer-songwriter says she quickly made up for lost time.

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Around the Nation
3:23 pm
Sun June 2, 2013

Detroit Museum Not The First To Consider Selling Out

Vincent van Gogh's Portrait of Postman Roulin is part of the collection in the city-owned Detroit Institute of Arts. The financially troubled city of Detroit is eyeing the sale of its prized artworks.
aPic Getty Images

Detroit doesn't have to wait for Antiques Roadshow to come to town to know the city owns priceless treasures. The city-owned Detroit Institute of Arts holds works by van Gogh, Matisse, Renoir and other artists that could bring in tens of millions of dollars each.

And they just might sell. With the city more than $15 billion in debt, Kevyn Orr, the state-appointed emergency manager trying to straighten out Detroit's finances, has asked the museum to inventory its works with an eye toward potentially selling them off.

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The Two-Way
2:37 pm
Sun June 2, 2013

Egypt Court Says Upper House Of Parliament Elected Illegally

Egypt's Supreme Constitutional Court ruled Sunday that the country's upper house of parliament — the so-called Shura council — was illegally elected.

As CBS News reports, that is a serious blow to President Mohammed Morsi's Freedom and Justice party, the political wing of the Muslim Brotherhood.

It will essentially cast a pretty big question mark over the constitution the Shura Council drafted and will no doubt embolden the opposition. CBS News explains:

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Parallels
12:41 pm
Sun June 2, 2013

Greece Has A PR Problem. Can It Be Fixed?

A protester burns an effigy depicting a Greek worker, in front of parliament in Athens on April 28. A few hundred public servants protested peacefully as lawmakers voted on a new austerity bill.
Kostas Tsironis AP

Originally published on Sun June 2, 2013 1:06 pm

Greece used to be a place with a positive global image: gorgeous islands, friendly people, great food and stunning history.

Then came the financial meltdown. Three years ago, when Greece became the first eurozone country to receive a multibillion-dollar bailout, many international media organizations portrayed Greeks as corrupt tax-evaders who liked to riot instead of work.

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Code Switch
12:38 pm
Sun June 2, 2013

The Overwhelming Nature Of Code-Switching

Matthew Salesses and his daughter, Grace, pose for a photo.
Daniel Salesses

Originally published on Mon June 3, 2013 11:49 am

Code-switching can be far from empowering. When I was 2 1/2, I was adopted from Korea. I went from one culture to another, one language to another. For me, code-switching wasn't a freedom, or a choice. It was a one-way street.

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The Two-Way
11:50 am
Sun June 2, 2013

Veteran Storm Chaser Among Those Killed In Oklahoma

Tornado chaser Tim Samaras shows the probes he uses when trying to collect data from a tornado. This photo was taken May 26, 2006, in Ames, Iowa.
Charlie Neibergall AP

Originally published on Sun June 2, 2013 2:46 pm

Tim Samaras had one passion in life: Tornadoes. He told The Weather Channel that when he was kid, his mother sat him down in front of The Wizard of Oz; he was immediately entranced by the violent, dark twister that tore through the landscape.

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The Two-Way
8:25 am
Sun June 2, 2013

After Two Violent Days, Protesters In Turkey Return

Protesters clash with riot police between Taksim and Besiktas in Istanbul, on Sunday.
Gurcan Ozturk AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun June 2, 2013 3:00 pm

This morning central Istanbul was quiet. It was still reeling from two days of anti-government rallies that led to violent confrontations with police. NPR's Peter Kenyon reports from Turkey that some 900 people were arrested across the country and several hundred were wounded.

Peter said officials "are beginning to ask questions about who ordered the fierce police crackdown on peaceful demonstrators that triggered the massive anti-government reaction."

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The Two-Way
7:43 am
Sun June 2, 2013

Wildfires Force Evacuations In California, New Mexico

Firefighters keep watch at Green Valley as the fire has burned more than 1,400 acres since Thursday in the Angeles National Forest just north of Castaic, in California.
Zhao Hanrong Xinhua /Landov

Originally published on Sun June 2, 2013 7:45 am

Wildfires in California and New Mexico forced the evacuation of hundreds of homes Saturday evening.

The Los Angeles Times has a riveting account of how the Powerhouse fire near a hydroelectric plant in Santa Clarita burned through a few homes.

Patty Robitaille, 61, was forced to leave her home. She grabbed a few documents, pictures and her pit bull. Then, she looked back: "Driving away, you could see the town burning up," she told the paper. "I don't think there's going to be much left."

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