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The Salt
1:25 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

Court To Monsanto: You Said You Won't Sue, So You Can't

A farmer holds Monsanto's Roundup Ready soybean seeds at his family farm in Bunceton, Mo.
Dan Gill AP

Originally published on Fri June 14, 2013 1:33 pm

A federal appeals court slapped down a quixotic legal campaign against Monsanto's biotech patents this week.

Organic farmers had gone to court to declare those patents invalid. The farmers, according to their lawyers, were "forced to sue preemptively to protect themselves from being accused of patent infringement" if their field became contaminated by Monsanto's genetically modified seed.

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Parallels
12:53 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

Iranian Women: New President Could Bring More Restrictions

An Iranian woman walks past posters of presidential candidate Hasan Rowhani, a former top nuclear negotiator, next to his campaign headquarters, in Tehran, Iran, on June 1. Many Iranian women are concerned about the erosion of their opportunities.
Vahid Salemi AP

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 2:00 pm

As Iran prepares to hold a presidential election Friday, many women say that their limited gains have been rolled back by the outgoing president, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.

Since all of the presidential candidates have been officially approved by Iran's clerical leaders, women say most are conservative and would be likely to continue adopting policies that target the social and educational advances by women.

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The Two-Way
12:39 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

50 Years Later, Medgar Evers' Widow Relives The Pain

Keynote speaker Myrlie Evers-Williams at Wagner College's commencement ceremony on May 24.
Jan Somma-Hammel Staten Island Advance /Landov

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 1:12 pm

As NPR's Debbie Elliott has reported for Morning Edition and on the Code Switch blog, "for Myrlie Evers-Williams, the widow of slain NAACP leader Medgar Evers, the memories of 1963 are still raw."

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Shots - Health News
12:29 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

Go Easy On The Soy Sauce, Bro, It Could Kill You

Keep the soy sauce on your food, and use it in moderation.
Aaron Tam AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 13, 2013 3:39 pm

First, let's spoil this tale right away by telling you the 19-year-old man in Virginia who downed a quart of soy sauce on a dare survived.

It's a happy ending of sorts. But the guy had a close call. And you definitely don't want to try it.

While there's been quite a debate lately about whether the salt in the modern American diet is risky, there's no question that a massive amount of salt ingested quickly can lead to death.

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Americas
12:17 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

Criminals Fleeing Rio Crackdown Set Up Shop In The Suburbs

Rio de Janeiro's Elite Special Forces Police Unit patrols the Caju favela complex as part of the pacification program designed to crack down on crime in advance of the World Cup in 2014 and the Summer Olympics in 2016.
Lianne Milton for NPR

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 10:27 am

The provincial town of Mage seems a world away from the violence and drug dealing that plague Brazil's larger cities. On a recent afternoon, the central square is a picture of calm. Children play around a fountain; older people sit on the many park benches dotting the area, under the shade of trees.

Mage, about 35 miles northwest of Rio, is close enough that people can commute to the city, which many of them do. Yet it's far enough away that nothing much really happened here in the past. But residents say that is changing.

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Americas
12:10 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

In Colombia, A Town Badly Scarred By Wartime Rape

Isabel Narvaez, in El Placer, says she is still traumatized by the rape she suffered. The small hamlet in Colombia is just one place where women were victims of violent crimes during the civil conflict.
Paul Smith for NPR

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 5:08 pm

El Placer is a remote hamlet deep in southern Colombia, on the edge of the Amazon. Founded half a century ago by farmers who found it fertile and bucolic, its name means "The Pleasure."

But for women and girls in El Placer who suffered years of sexual assaults after an illegal armed group stormed in, the name is only associated with unspeakable violence and murder.

Brigitte Carreño, 25, is among the women who suffered. A feared local warlord in El Placer raped her when she was 12, leaving her with searing memories that remain vivid and painful to this day.

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The Two-Way
12:08 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

10-Year-Old Sarah Murnaghan Out Of Surgery

Sarah Murnaghan on May 30 as she and her parents, Fran (left) and Janet, marked the 100th day of her stay in Children's Hospital of Philadelphia.
Murnaghan family AP

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 8:31 pm

(We retopped this post at 8:27 p.m. ET)

Sarah Murnaghan, the 10-year-old girl in need of a lung transplant, is out of surgery, her family said in a statement.

"We are thrilled to share that Sarah is out of surgery," the statement said. "Her doctors are very pleased with both her progress during the procedure and her prognosis for recovery."

The statement said the procedure lasted about six hours, and surgeons had no challenges resizing and transplanting the donor lungs.

Our original post:

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The Two-Way
12:08 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

Soccer Star Lionel Messi And His Father Accused Of Tax Fraud

Lionel Messi.
Rebecca Naden PA Photos /Landov

Lionel Messi, the Argentine superstar who is generally thought of as the best soccer player in the world these days, has been accused of tax fraud by Spanish authorities.

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Americas
12:05 pm
Wed June 12, 2013

Honduras Claims Unwanted Title Of World's Murder Capital

Members of the 18th Street gang announce a truce during a press conference at a prison in San Pedro Sula, on May 28. The gang is involved in drug trafficking that has brought terror to El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras.
Loenel Cruz AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Tue July 2, 2013 5:03 pm

Latin America is riddled with crime, and no place is more violent than Honduras. It has just 8 million people, but with as many as 20 people killed there every day, it now has the highest murder rate in the world.

It would be easy to blame drug trafficking. Honduras and its Central American neighbors have long served as a favored smuggling corridor for South American cocaine headed north to the U.S.

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History
11:32 am
Wed June 12, 2013

50 Years Of Remembering Medgar Evers, His Widow Reflects

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 11:42 am

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin. And this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. We start the program today with a memory. Fifty years ago today, a few minutes after midnight, civil rights activist Medgar Evers was gunned down in his driveway in Jackson, Mississippi by a white segregationist who wanted to stop Evers' work as a field organizer for the NAACP. He was just 37 years old, a war veteran, a husband, and father of three. Evers had put his life on the line to register voters. Here he is a month before his murder.

(SOUNDBITE OF MEDGAR EVERS)

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Around the Nation
11:32 am
Wed June 12, 2013

Want To Know Something? Just Ask

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 12:00 pm

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

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Art & Design
11:32 am
Wed June 12, 2013

Designer Ozwald Boateng On Being The 'Statesman of Cool'

Oswald Boateng has designed for the rich and famous.
Dan Kitwood Getty Images

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 4:49 pm

Ozwald Boateng was the youngest and first black tailor to have a shop on London's prestigious Savile Row, a street renowned for its fine tailoring, where the world's royalty come for their attire.

Boateng also dresses athletic and Hollywood royalty. Actor Laurence Fishburne once said, "When you wear an Ozwald Boateng suit, you become a statesman of cool." Boateng is also a statesman for something else: the future development of Africa.

He joined Tell Me More host Michel Martin to talk about style and diplomacy.

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The Two-Way
11:11 am
Wed June 12, 2013

NHL's Stanley Cup Playoffs Open Tonight

The 2013 NHL Stanley Cup logo is seen between the sweaters of the Boston Bruins and Chicago Blackhawks. The Game 1 puck drops at 8 p.m. Wednesday in Chicago.
Charles Rex Arbogast AP

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 11:15 am

Yes, the NBA finals are well underway, and yes it's mid-June, but tonight marks Game 1 of the National Hockey League's Stanley Cup championship. A strike-shortened season pushed the finals later into the spring than usual.

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The Two-Way
10:58 am
Wed June 12, 2013

Public's Opinion Of George W. Bush Is Turning Positive

Former President George W. Bush and his successor, President Obama, at the April 25 dedication of Bush's library on the campus of Southern Methodist University in Dallas.
Larry W. Smith EPA /LANDOV

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 11:24 am

For the first time since 2005, when George W. Bush was in the Oval Office, the public's opinion of the former president is "more positive than negative," the pollsters at Gallup say.

Gallup says its latest polling shows:

-- 49 percent of those surveyed have a favorable opinion of the former president.

-- 46 percent have an unfavorable opinion of Bush.

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The Two-Way
10:46 am
Wed June 12, 2013

NSA Leaker: 'I'm Neither Traitor Nor Hero. I'm An American'

In a 12-minute video on The Guardian's website, Edward Snowden talks about how American surveillance systems work and why he decided to reveal that information to the public.
The Guardian

Originally published on Wed June 12, 2013 11:34 am

"I'm neither traitor nor hero. I'm an American."

That's what Edward Snowden tells the South China Morning Post in his first published interview since The Guardian and The Washington Post revealed he was the source who leaked top secret information about government programs that sweep up data on phone calls and Internet activity.

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