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The Two-Way
7:29 am
Thu June 5, 2014

Bergdahl's Hometown Cancels Celebration Of His Return

Hailey, Idaho: A sign announcing the release of Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl outside Zaney's coffee shop, where Bergdahl worked as a teenager. A rally celebrating his return home has been canceled, after organizers received threats of protests and hate mail.
Scott Olson Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 8:48 am

The news of Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl's release from five years of captivity had been welcomed as a reason to celebrate in Hailey, Idaho. But organizers of a rally held in Bergdahl's honor while he was a prisoner say they're canceling this year's event, citing backlash over the U.S. deal with the Taliban that freed him.

In recent years, the Bring Back Bowe Rally has been an annual June event in the small town of Hailey, where bikers and POW-MIA support groups gathered to call for his return. Last year's event reportedly drew a crowd of more than 3,000.

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Sports
7:06 am
Thu June 5, 2014

Miami Heat Aims To Win Legacy-Defining 3rd Straight NBA Title

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 12:40 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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The Two-Way
7:05 am
Thu June 5, 2014

Book News: Experimental Debut Novel Wins Prestigious Baileys Prize

Eimear McBride won the 2014 Baileys Women's Prize for Fiction for her debut novel, A Girl Is a Half-formed Thing. The novel was rejected by publishers for almost a decade.
Stuart C. Wilson Getty Images for Baileys/Diageo

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 11:03 am

The daily lowdown on books, publishing, and the occasional author behaving badly.

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Around the Nation
6:58 am
Thu June 5, 2014

2 Governors Face Off Over Hockey's Stanley Cup

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 12:40 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Europe
6:25 am
Thu June 5, 2014

70 Years On, A Normandy Village Honors Aging WWII Veterans

U.S. World War II veteran Arden C. Earll, 89, of Erie, Pa., landed on Omaha Beach on June 6, 1944, with the 29th Infantry Division. A crowd applauds as he arrives at a ceremony in honor of the division Wednesday in La Cambe, France, as part of the commemoration of the 70th D-Day anniversary.
Claude Paris AP

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 12:40 pm

Germaine and Lucien Rigault, 86 and 89 years old, respectively, lean out their first-floor window, watching people go by. They were here in the tiny French hamlet of La Cambe on June 6, 1944, the day the Allies invaded Normandy and began the liberation of France and Europe from Nazi control during World War II.

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NPR Story
6:12 am
Thu June 5, 2014

Alaskan Volcano Erupts With Intensity

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 12:40 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Around the Nation
6:06 am
Thu June 5, 2014

Vultures Land On K Street

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 12:40 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep. There's a certain kind of news story for which you simply must rely on The Washington Post. This is that story. The Post published pictures of vultures on K Street. Washingtonians know K Street as the classic address for Washington lobbyists. A Post reporter got one punch line after another when asking passersby what they thought of vultures roosting on a K Street rooftop, like the bird variety. And that sounds appropriate. It's MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

Politics
5:10 am
Thu June 5, 2014

Senate Expected To Approve Sebelius Replacement At HHS

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 12:40 pm

The Senate votes Thursday on the nomination of Sylvia Mathews Burwell to be Health and Human Services Secretary, replacing Kathleen Sebelius. Burwell was running the Office of Management and Budget.

National Security
5:10 am
Thu June 5, 2014

If It Comes Time To Negotiate With Terrorists, Never Say Never

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 12:40 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Now, the swap for Bergdahl prompted many people to recall a truism about American foreign-policy. The line is that America does not negotiate with terrorists, a principle that seemed to have been violated here.

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

In fact, that truism has not often been true. America has negotiated with terrorists and so have other governments.

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NPR Story
5:10 am
Thu June 5, 2014

Questions Abound Over Why Bergdahl Left Afghan Post

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 12:40 pm

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

Now, the U.S. military is saying very little about Sergeant Bergdahl's condition now that he's in a military hospital in Germany. Army leaders have said that once he is determined to be healthy, they will investigate the circumstances of his capture and whether he broke any military laws and should be prosecuted. For more, we're joined in our studio by NPR Pentagon correspondent, Tom Bowman. Tom, good morning.

TOM BOWMAN, BYLINE: Good morning, David.

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Parallels
3:34 am
Thu June 5, 2014

As Brazil Barrels Toward World Cup, Brazilians Aren't Feeling It

Corinthians Arena in Sao Paulo, Brazil, holds a test match Sunday ahead of the World Cup. One fan who attended said the country "didn't deliver" and isn't ready for the event.
Migquel Schincariol AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 6:47 pm

The stadium where the opening game of the World Cup will be played is a gleaming monument to the world's favorite sport, soccer. The Corinthians Arena — named after one of Brazil's most famous teams, which will take it over — has been built from scratch and boasts a massive LCD screen and state-of-the-art facilities.

Last weekend, it was full of fans watching the last test match before the World Cup begins. It was supposed to be a sort of final run-through to make sure everything is ready and working.

Except it wasn't.

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All Tech Considered
3:32 am
Thu June 5, 2014

A Year After Snowden, U.S. Tech Losing Trust Overseas

Participants hold up images of former NSA analyst Edward Snowden at an April conference on the future of Internet governance in Sao Paulo, Brazil.
Andre Penner AP

Originally published on Thu June 5, 2014 5:18 pm

This week marks the one-year anniversary of the Snowden revelations. Whatever you may think about Edward Snowden the man — is he a traitor or a hero? — one fact is indisputable. His leaks shook the U.S. technology industry to its core. And the reverberations keep on coming.

Take Cisco. The Silicon Valley giant is now at risk of losing its once-stellar reputation with foreign customers — at the exact same moment it needs to grow abroad.

Security Worries For The Cloud

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The Salt
3:29 am
Thu June 5, 2014

The Secret's In The Sugar: Lower-Alcohol Wines Are Taking Off

A selection of low-alcohol wines, including a Riesling from Germany, a Vinho Verde from Portugal and a Txakoli from the Basque region of Spain.
Meredith Rizzo NPR

Originally published on Tue June 10, 2014 8:18 am

Big, bold wines have their fans. But with the arrival of summer, make room for a bumper crop of lighter, more subtle wines.

"Low-alcohol wines are super hot right now," says wine writer Katherine Cole.

There's Txakoli, or Txakolina, wines from the Basque region of Spain, Rieslings from Germany and New York state, and Vinho Verde from Portugal, to name a few.

These wines typically hover in the 9 percent to 11 percent alcohol range. This compares to about 13 percent to 14 percent in a typical California chardonnay.

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The Two-Way
7:41 pm
Wed June 4, 2014

Attorney Says Sterling Will Sell Clippers, Drop NBA Suit

Donald Sterling watches his Los Angeles Clippers play the Sacramento Kings in October. Sterling's attorney says he has agreed to sell the team.
Mark J. Terrill AP

Reuters is quoting an attorney for Los Angeles Clippers owner Donald Sterling as saying his client has agreed to sell the team, and to drop a $1 billion lawsuit against the NBA.

Attorney Maxwell Blecher said Wednesday that Sterling "has made an agreement with the NBA to resolve all their differences," according to SI.com.

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The Two-Way
7:04 pm
Wed June 4, 2014

Most Americans See Bible As Word Of God, Gallup Says

Abraham T. Moses, principal of the the Washington United Christian Academy, reads scriptures aloud during the 25th annual U.S. Capitol Bible Reading Marathon on April 28, 2014.
AP

Originally published on Wed June 4, 2014 7:33 pm

Three out of four Americans believe the Bible is the word of God, according to a new Gallup poll; some say the literal word, others that a supreme being inspired the text. But an increasing number also view the book as simply a collection of fables, legends and history.

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