Rob Stein is a correspondent and senior editor on NPR's science desk.

In his reporting, Stein focuses on the intersection of science, health, politics, social trends, ethics, and federal science policy. He tracks genetics, stem cells, cancer research, the obesity epidemic, and other science, medical, and health policy news.

Before NPR, Stein served as The Washington Post's science editor and national health reporter for 16 years, editing and then covering stories nationally and internationally.

Earlier in his career, Stein spent about four years at NPR's science desk. Before that, he served as a science reporter for United Press International in Boston and the science editor of the international wire service in Washington.

Food and Dining
1:00 pm
Thu September 20, 2012

Linda Gassenheimer’s South Florida “Restaurant Roundabout” 09/20/12

Linda Gassenheimer
http://www.dinnerinminutes.com/

09/20/12 - Thursday's Topical Currents is an edition of our popular “Restaurant Roundabout” with Linda Gassenheimer and dining critics from Palm Beach, Broward and Miami-Dade.  Learn about new hot spots and chefs old favorites and best values. Critics Jen Karetnik, Rochelle Koff and Jan Norris will take calls.  Plus Fred Tasker gives his wine suggestions.  That’s Topical Currents with hosts Joseph Cooper and Bonnie Berman 09/20/12 at 1pm on 91.3 WLRN-HD1 rebroadcast at 7pm on WLRN-HD2.

David Greene is NPR's Morning Programming Host/Correspondent. In this role he is the primary substitute host for Morning Edition as well as Weekend Edition Saturday and Sunday. When he is not hosting he brings his deep reporting talents to these programs.

Real Estate
9:13 pm
Wed September 19, 2012

Palm Beach County’s Middle Class Still Waiting For Promised “Workforce Housing”

Flickr/Dean Terry

A controversial agreement between Palm Beach County and developers is finally producing reduced-price homes for low- to middle-income families.

It’s just not happening fast enough.

In 2006, at the height of South Florida’s building boom, the county decided to set aside affordable housing for its workforce.  So it struck what sounded like a sweet deal for developers: they could build more houses than usual within certain areas, provided they knock down some prices. 

Read more
Romney in Miami
9:09 pm
Wed September 19, 2012

In Miami, Romney Connects With His Segment Of Latinos

Hundreds braved punishing heat and humidity at El Palacio de los Jugos for a glimpse of Mitt Romney.
Credit Rick Stone / WLRN

Mitt Romey made a stop at El Palacio de los Jugos, or the Palace of Juice, to reach out to Republican Latinos.

El Palacio is a popular Latino spot located on Coral Way in Miami.

Romney was met with an excited crowd at the event. However, experts will probably tell you that this isn't exactly a sign that Romney has a lock on the Hispanic vote.

In fact, polling shows that he doesn’t. With Latinos as a whole, Romney is doing best with South Florida's Cuban Republicans.

Read more
Dirty Politics
9:06 pm
Wed September 19, 2012

Campaign For State House Seat In Miami Becomes Ugly Personal Fight

Credit MyFloridaHouse.gov

One of the ugliest primary races in the state is going on here in South Florida.

Gus Barreiro and Alex De la Portilla, both former Republican state lawmakers, are battling it out for a Florida House seat in Miami.

Their race has become a messy fight with a series of slurs against each man’s moral character.

They also have quite a bit in common.

Both men come from political families, as well as a past as state lawmakers in the Florida Legislature. 

Read more
Early Voting
8:32 pm
Wed September 19, 2012

Florida Starts Early Voting With Dual Election Laws

Early voters line up in Aventura, Nov. 2008
digitalshaman/flickr

Monroe County, and four other Florida counties,  have begun early voting for the August 14th primary. All five are protected by the 1965 Voting Rights Act. This means that any new voting law there must be cleared by the federal government.

Last year, state lawmakers passed a law reducing the number of early voting days.

“Until this year, the state has refrained from implementing those changes statewide until it had pre-clearance to do so in the five covered counties,” explains Michael Masinter, a law professor at Nova Southeastern University.

Read more

Whether covering the manhunt and eventual capture of Eric Robert Rudolph in the mountains of North Carolina, the remnants of the Oklahoma City federal building with its twisted metal frame and shattered glass, flood-ravaged Midwestern communities, or the terrorist bombings across the country, including the blast that exploded in Centennial Olympic Park in downtown Atlanta, correspondent Kathy Lohr has been at the heart of stories all across the nation.

Topical Currents
1:00 pm
Wed September 19, 2012

Alex Berzow: The Rise of the Anti-Scientific Left

09/19/12 - Wednesday's Topical Currents looks at the trend of many so-called “progressives” to disregard scientific opinion. One usually thinks of the conservative right disputing evolution, global warming and stem cell treatments . . . but those on the left have railed against vaccines, “green energy” forms and genetically modified foods. We’ll speak with the co-author of SCIENCE LEFT BEHIND: Feel Good Fallacies and the Rise of the Anti-Scientific Left, Alex Berzow.

Pages